Newbie Question - Getting sawdust off/out of the wood

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I had asked this in the long thread I had going but decided to pull it out of there into this subject specific post.
In the other thread, someone had warned me against using tackcloth and had advised me to make my own using old shellac. I responded with:
So, if tackcloths are out and I don't want to make my own as you describe, what about wiping off the wood with mineral spirits, thinner, or alcohol? Do these raise the grain and require light resanding after use as water does? I don't like the idea of having to sand again AFTER wiping sawdust off with water -- it seems like an endless cycle -- water -- sand -- water -- sand...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Mineral spirits does (do?) not raise the grain the way water does. I'll not say it does not raise the grain at all, but not enough to warrant resanding. Alcohol in the shop will always have at least a little water in it, but probably not enough to be a problem either.
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FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

So if you have more than one, is it Minerals Spirit? Minerals Spirits? Or Mineral Spiritses?
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Owen Lowe
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I see no reason to avoid a tackcloth. I have never had a problem with it in the last 25 years.

In some cases like when using an open grained wood like Red Oak, the liquid used can actually cause the pores to fill with sanding dust and cause an uneven appearance.
Do these raise the grain and require light resanding after

Petrolium pased products do not raise the grain like water does.
I don't like the idea of having to sand again AFTER

I would not either. You are apparently wetting down too many times. Sand through all your grits and then lightly apply water to raise the grain. Then do a final light sanding to remove the fuzz. This most often will be all you will need to do before applying a water based finish.
I prefer to use compressed air over anything to remove the dust of the project and out of the pores of the wood.
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Thanks, what I'm getting at is that after I wetted and sanded I've got a little bit more sawdust in/on the wood. I've got to get rid of that, somehow.
BTW, no air compressor here -- wish I did have one.
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Blow it or tack rag it.
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Leon wrote:

Never had some fibers embed themselves in the wood?
Me too--on using compressed air. It REALLY cleans dust out of the pores!
Dave
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Leon wrote:

Leon,
Is your compressor an oil-lubed or an airless? And if it's an oil-lubed, do you have an oil filter on it? I've heard that an oil-lubed filter can spray minute quantities of oil which can cause problems with the finish.
I just bought a small (read: cheap) oil-lubed myself, and I've been hesitant to do what you describe for fear of what I just described.
Am I worrying too much?
Thanks.
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CORRECTION:
The above should have been:
"I've heard that an oil-lubed *compressor* can spray minute quantities of oil..."
Filters almost never do any spraying themselves...
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you can put an oil/water trap somewhere in your airline to alleviate that problem.
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wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes. I use my oil lubed (and filtered) compressor to blow off projects before and during finishing operations. Unless there's a serious problem with oil contamination of the lines, you shouldn't have problem.
Silicone contamination is even worse than minute particles of oil.
Dave
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Hello, I use those pastel dusting cloths with the surface with all the cut fibers. I looked on one but did not see a brand name. They hold an amazing amount of dust can be cleaned over and over. . Especially good for final wiping before finishing. I was using used dryer sheets. I do a lot of spray finishing and they seems to work well, get very smooth surfaces. I also use a compressor which works fairly well but seldom seems to get the last bit of dust. Sometimes I use a vacuum with a soft brush. Don't use tack cloths anymore.
Mike R
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By pastel dusting cloths do you mean something like Swiffer Sweeps? I think I may try those, too. I'm guessing that if a tackcloth *does* put a little oil on the wood that a quick wipe with mineral spirits would clean it up.
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Oil lubed. I have never had oil come out of the hose. More often I have a problem with moisture condensing inside the hose and spraying on the wood but that is only a slight mist and quickly evaporates. IMHO your finish will probably hide/blend with, any specs of oil if any comes out.

Probably, I never have had that problem.
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Converting to waterbased finishes has raised a whole bunch of issues. I was raised with oil based stuff and was happier than I was when waterbased shtuff first came to California. People have reported contamination from tack cloths, presumed by me to mean WB finishes instead of oil based. My suggestion was based on what I believe to be a Jeff Jewitt suggestion for possible win-win use of expired shellac. Avoid off the shelf tack cloth and avoid dumping expired shellac down the drain. Makers of finishes have made GREAT leaps in their finishes and oil based shtuff is out of my inventory. I don't use waxy shellac as dewaxed is more universal as an undercoat and anything can be used on top. Furthermore this is Thursday.
On Thu, 01 Dec 2005 16:21:25 GMT, "Leon"

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nospambob wrote:

I presume yopu meant that figuratively. IMHE mixing shellac with water immediately hardens the shellac. Not the sort of thing you want to happen in the trap below your drain.
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FF


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You're right ... but use hot water and household ammonia if you do happen to be cleaning up shellac equipment in the sink. That way you will have a better chance of surviving a SWMBO's wrath.
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Appreciate the follow up info! I seldom have surplus shellac and it was figuratively.

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I was just having a quick re-read of all the replies here. I'm a little confused, now, about the use of water -- I thought you *had* to use it to raise the grain at some point in the finishing process. But -- it's almost sounding as if you only need to do that if you are about to apply a water-based finish (which I'm not). Is that correct?
With oil-based products do you just use mineral spirits?
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On 5 Dec 2005 04:58:23 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com scribbled:

Yes. If you don't deliberately do it before, water-based finishes will raise the grain.

Oil-based products do not raise the gain, so there is no need to raise to do it.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Woodworking
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