Newbie question

I need to make some wedges that will be out of nominal by four stock, that is, probably cut out of four by four. They will be 10" long, and feather from nothing to about 3/4". They are for shims. How would I make, or where would I buy something that can cut these on a table saw with a 10" blade?
Steve
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On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 20:18:42 -0800, "Steve B"

No can do. 12" OK, 10" too small, extending only 3-1/8"-3-1/4" or so from the tabletop.
Most bandsaws can handle it, though. Cut the 4x to 11", add a 3/4" shim on the close end, set the fence against the blade, and run the piece through the saw. Flip it over, install the shim, and cut the other side. Move on to another 11" piece.
If your blade has a different cutting angle in mind, find it and adjust shim thickness to suit.
P.S: See, guys, cut to "suit" doesn't have an "e" in it.
-- Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed. -- Storm Jameson
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Well you can do it a few ways. First is using a tapering jig. If you DAGS on it, you can get thousands of ideas on how to make one. Another is to use a jig that many use to straighten warped or bowed lumber. If you wanted something really simple, you could use a crosscut sled. Only your imagination can limit you on this.
Allen
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wrote:

Well you can do it a few ways. First is using a tapering jig. If you DAGS on it, you can get thousands of ideas on how to make one. Another is to use a jig that many use to straighten warped or bowed lumber. If you wanted something really simple, you could use a crosscut sled. Only your imagination can limit you on this.
Allen
First of all, I'm a welder. A good one. I had the thought of just using the t shaped adjustable protractor, and entering the degree I want, and slowly cutting it, leaving the guide in the groove. Or making my own "sled" that will ride in the guide, but have a piece of angle welded on at the proper angle to keep it safe on the saw. Maybe even put a couple of drywall screws in to hold it to the angle, but nowhere the saw is going to cut. These only have to be close.
Steve
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wrote:

Current issue of Shopnotes has such a jig. Will do tapers, cut rough edges, and peel potatoes in its spare time.
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


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I don't think my table saw would cut 4" depth, even without a sled...
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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On 11/30/2010 01:28 AM, mac davis wrote:

Agreed. Clean up the cut surface (if need be) with a hand plane.
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Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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You may have to reduce the size slightly, since most 10 inch table saws have a max depth of cut of 3.125 or 3.25" or so, and a 4X4 is 3.5". I have heard of people installing 12" blades on certain makes & models of 10" saws but certainly most will not accept the larger blade, and the few that do, of course cannot be tilted with it in place.
As for cutting the wedges, there are plenty of simple jigs you can make. Most good tables saw books will describe some or you can find plenty by googling "Table saw wedge cutting jigi." Be careful. With the wedge size you're needing the blade will be a max height.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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"Steve B" wrote:

Trying to produce tapered shims that taper to nothing is going to produce a lot of scrap shims less than 10" long.
The only way to make a 4" cut with a 10" table saw blade is to make a 2" cut, flip the piece and complete the cut.
To do this will require two sleds, each with it's own taper jig.
Finally a couple of clean up passes thru a jointer to get a clean tapered surface.
Careful out there, if your not careful, could be some unpleasant surprises.
Lew
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