newbie question

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TheNewGuy wrote:

Don't know of <any> who do adjust for surfacing (other than, perhaps some of the mail order places who deal in specialty project pieces and I'm not even sure of that for other than thin pieces which aren't normally priced by bd-ft anyway). As I noted previously, it's based on the raw stock size before any surfacing. Any place that will base the bd-ft value on surfaced thickness will adjust the price/bd-ft to reflect the original stock as they will certainly have that as the cost basis in buying the material.
And in case I misinterpreted your meaning above, actually, they calculate by thickness, just that in the case of 4/4 stock it's "1" so it numerically is the same. Buy some 6/4 stock and see if they "ignore" it then... :)
And for point three, just in case, the point was to <define> a bd-ft to OP who I thought as he noted he was new to buying hardwoods might just not actually know...
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You got my meaning just right :)
Duane Bozarth wrote:

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if you buy S2S 1 x 4 it's like 3/4" x 3 3/4"...
mac
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mac, as I mentioned, it will vary. I just bought S2S ash from a lumberyard, and it measures 15/16". From another yard, it was 13/16. Further, S2S says nothing about the width, and this ash varies all over. You're talking about dimensioned lumber. GerryG
On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:45:22 -0800, mac davis

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wrote:

like a 2x4 isn't actually 2 inches thick or 4 inches wide, 8/4 lumber is not really 2" thick if it has been dressed to a semi-usable state. You typically lose 1/4 inch in thickness to the planer. Thus 4/4 lumber that has been surfaced is really 3/4" thick (just like your typical 1x construction lumber).
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Wow, interesting !
Then on a historic note, why the "1/4" inch has been chosen to name lumber ? My first guess would be the thickness of the saw blade used ?

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Junkyard Engineer wrote:

More that rough sawn at mill in quarter-inch increments is sufficiently fine to allow for whatever final thickness an end-user may wish -- of course, w/ modern computer-controlled and band mills one could make anything one desired, but most mills (except for veneer, of course) are still pretty coarse...
How thick the blade is isn't really particularly important to how thick a board is sawed off the slab other than it has to be stiff enough to not flex.
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Junkyard Engineer wrote:

Wood is cut green at the mill and it shrinks when it dries. The sawyers have to make an educated guess when they saw the log for the required yield. I imagine 1/4" is as close as they care to shoot for.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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mac
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