Newbie - First tablesaw accident

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TonyP wrote:

My first saw was like that. Frustrating at times. When I got my Delta contractor model, it made cross cutting wide boards much easier than I ever imagined. If you are going to stick withy the hobby, start saving for the better, larger, saw.
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It is good practice to remove cut-offs from the table top as you cut them. Put them on your bench or at very least on the opposite side of the fence (with fence well away from blade as others have mentioned).
I developed this habit after a slightly worse accident than you describe. Years ago I cut off several small spacers allowing them to accumulate near the back of the table. I turned the saw off and as I walked away I noticed one still on the table. I stupidly reached over the blade and guess what - it was still moving.
Hamburgered fingertip and new respect.
RonB
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The first shop that I ever worked in that had a tablesaw (I'm a machinist but in this shop I was making vacuum molds an router fixtures), had a rule about the table saw. When you are done, crank the blade down below the tabletop.

noticed
what -

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I do that on the shopsmith on the rare times that I use it for a saw... in that case, it's crank the table up until the blade is below the table.. I mainly do it to protect the blade from me, not me from the blade, though..
Prevents me from laying something on the table "for a second" and dinging the blade with it and messing up the blade..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Nothing wrong with that saw...

Were you using both the miter gauge *and* fence in the crosscut? That's always a No-No. Never trap the cutoff portion of the wood between the blade and fence. Slide the fence way off to one side, or construct a "short-fence/stop-block".
"Hands on the board" - using two hands might actually lead you to tilting the piece into the blade. Does for some, doesn't for others. And as for "hands" - you *do* have push sticks, right???
Reaching for the off-switch: consider making yourself a knee activated off switch. Most woodworkers figure out a way to craft one for their saws for that rare occasion when you need to kill the power without letting go.
Getting whacked - remember to try and find a place to stand that keeps you out of the line of fire without compromising your balance or safety.
Finally - make a crosscut sled or panel cutting sled for crosscuts, you'll be very glad you did!

Maybe. It sounds like somehow the peice came in contact with the spinning blade. Either you moved it there or it vibrated there and became a projectile.

Yes... Every time you use it, it dulls a little! :) I doubt that this had anything to do with your kickback.
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TonyP wrote:

I'll say it a little differently than other people. Planning... Get your self a book on the use of the table saw. Read the safety instructions -- at least twice. But other people gave great advice -- so absorb it and use the safety information that works for you!
Assume you are going to do something wrong -- every time you use a power tool. Then figure out how you will get out of the problem -- then do that stuff first...
i.e. -- assume the cut goes wrong and you need a piece of wood handy to reach over and trip the switch etc. Assume that you will need to power off in a hurry -- so position yourself close to the switch. Make sure that you have a clear work area in case you have to knock something out of the way quickly. etc. (Then of course you would have had only one thing on the saw top... unless you know how to use a fence with a little block of wood to use it as a stop gauge.)
Paranoia is healthy when working with power tools.
Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean that "they" _aren't_ out to get you. :-)
I actually use the leather apron all the time -- and use the face mask if an off-cut is small. I assume that it will fly off -- then I try to be "out of the line of fire".
Think safety -- live long and make much sawdust.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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TonyP wrote:

THAT's when you have to really pay attention. It's a modified version of ' "It's awfully quiet out there. Too quiet." - he says as, in the darkness, the Apache creeps up on him from the rear, knife in hand and eyes fixed - on his neck.

Oh yeah - just add a few more horsepower and a full kerf blade to make things safer . . .

Not sure if you're talking about the miter fence or the rip fence. If it was the rip fence - and you were using it to set the off cut length you were asking for trouble. The cut off would have no place to go if anything goes wrong - except up and into the rear teeth and from there only the gods know where it'll head. The Flip 'N Fly "kickback" is the most unpredictable but being to the left of the blade is not the safest place to be on that one.

Wrong-o, Wrong-o, Wrong-o. First pull the wood AWAY from the blade, hold it with one hand and turn off the saw. Letting go of anything up against or close to carbide teeth spinning at 5000+ rpms just isn't prudent.

I'm betting that some part of the cut off end of the board made contact with a rear tooth - the one coming UP and out of the table. It in turn probably lifted it up into a tooth or two that was less vertical, pulling the board up onto the teeth that are heading towards the front of the table.

When I do something like this I just assume it was the loose nut in front of the machine - me.
Perhaps some info of what is doing what and what you can do to minimize IT doing something TO YOU is in order. If you understand "why" you can minimize the "WHAT!?" that precedes the "DAMN!" or worse yet, getting to know the folks at the nearest emergency room.
So please at least have a look at this stuff.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/KickBack1.html
Woodworking is fun - if you do it safely.
charlie b
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 11:00:54 -0700, TonyP wrote:

The tablesaw didn't make the mistake. You did.Pay attention.
That said, no matter how focused you try to be, eventually your attention will wander.
Sometime ago I made a mistake that brought a finger into contact with the spinning blade. Hamburger, but not amputation. But only because it was a legthwise cut.
That is why I am going to make a suggestion that no one else did. I'm going to suggest that you keep a clean rag handy where you only need one hand to get to it. . On the day you need it, you'll know why. You'll also know why you haven't time to tear a sterile package open.
Try to avoid using the saw when there is no one else to drive for you.DAMHIKT.
Bill
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