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I have always wanted to be a woodworker. Building furniture and making house repairs. , building a deck is my main goal. I have no training and want to know where to get started. I tried to email my local high school but got no answer. I know I should go to class first. I live in marysville, ohio and not sure where I can get classes, a good cost and so forth. Also, when my husband found out I wanted to be a woodworker, he is pushing me to go out and buy tools. I told him I dont want to buy tools without advice. I want midrange multipurpose tools. Not too expensive, not too cheap. Is there a place where I can get a list. also lighweight would be good for me becasue I dont have regular size wrists. My hands and wrists are very small. I have a dremel with attachemets and a 24 volt drill. I have a work bench and that thing that goes around your waist to hold tools. I have drill heads, various nail sizes, hammer, wrenches, level, tape measure, hand saw, pencils and various screw drivers. I know a little terms but not alot. There is so much to know so an someone help me put and give me basics so i can know what questions to ask? I am a computer analsys by trade right now. Please assist
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On Feb 11, 11:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:I want to add more to my post. Also, I want to add that I understand you have to respect the wood and the tools. I understand it will take me alot of time and effort. I want to do it. I hope I can.
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On Feb 11, 10:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You absolutely can. Read everything that is remotely connected to what you are interested in at the time. If you are looking at buiding your deck, go to the library or half priced book store and look for books on building decks and framing. Most of the project books will tell you what materials, what tools, and how much time will need to budget. That way you can make sure you have what you need (including tools) before you start.
You probably won't find one or two definitive sources on any aspect of woodworking that will suffice, but the good news is that there are thousands of books on the subject.
If you are interested in building your deck, save reading the books on compound mitering of multiple layered crown mouldings. Those can wait, as well as anicillary information on door installation, cutting in hip roofs, or whatever you run into.
Learn one aspect of wood working really well, or as much as you are interested, then move on. Many of the skills you learn doing the most basic tasks will transfer onto other aspects of woodworking.
Don't buy tools as "investments" for that big project when you are starting out. Buy what you need and buy quality. Your tools don't have to be the best, but junk tools can certainly be their own punishment. Your tools need to be able to hold adjustments and have enough power to work well for your applications. I always try to buy tools that I can >economically< rebuild or replace parts as needed.
Practice using all your tools. Poor workmen almost always blame tools or materials for bad work. It is almost never the case, and poor work is usually a fundamental lack of skills. I would give a little leeway on the crap material we are all served up these days, but anything more than just junk for a tool will usually outperform the user.
And then practice some more. Then read some more. Search the net - including this newsgroup when you have questions. I would venture that most here have gotten a lot of their education that way.
Good luck! Let us know how you are doing.
Robert
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On Feb 11, 11:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Woodworking is classified somewhere between crack cocaine and Lays potato chips. Once bitten, the bug is impossible to shake. It is a wonderful and rewarding hobby.
If I had to give one piece of advice based on my personal experience it would be learning how to draw. Either manually or with your computer. A basic course, a basic program..but learn to get those thoughts/ideas out of your head into a form you can edit, look at, file for later. It brings some organization to the process.
A drawing will tell you so much about what you know and what you don't know.
Start with a big sheet of paper and draw, life-size, something like an end table..or a night stand..or a bird-feeder. Use real measurements. It is a skill which you can develop along with the SAFE handling of tools. Tools can quickly create projects and remove fingers. Very versatile.
Learn to draw and learn to be safe.
Advice? Lots. They're a helpful bunch in here-a lot of fabulously diverse characters, many of which are a pleasure to interact with.
r (Rob)
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I'll second that idea.
I'd also like to point out the fact that there's more than one way to do it. If your local community college offers a drafting class, that may be a good starting place. Drafting can teach you to recognize lines and angles, something essential for laying out your design.
I've also found that my drafting skills come in handy when I want to communicate a design to my very visual mother and sister.
Puckdropper
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If building a deck is you main goal, start with that. You probably want a circular saw, a miter saw, and possible a jig saw. You probably also want a cordless drill (or two - one for drilling pilot holes and another for screwing).
Building furnitre is another matter. Start. There are numerous URL's that suggest a minum tools collection. You also need to decide whether you're going to be the power tool feind (Normite - after Norm Abram's on the New Yankee Workshop) , hand tool fiend (a neander after Neanderthals) , or some combination of both.
As you accumulate tools, pick projects you can do or can do with the purchase of a few more tools. After about 2 years you'll have everything you need in one form or another.
I'd buy a table saw. Then build a bench. Then build a router table. Then you've gained some experience just by building your shop.
On Feb 11, 9:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On 11 Feb 2007 20:29:00 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There's a Woodcraft in Columbus--go by there and talk to the people--they'll know what's going on in the area. They have classes themselves and should be able to put you in touch with any clubs in the area. While you're there look through their books and plans and see if you find anything that looks like it would be fun to do, then do it. Get the tools you need for that project. If you screw it up you do--use it for firewood and start over.
For house repairs and building construction, one thing you might want to do is volunteer for Habitat for Humanity--they're always happy to have another pair of willing hands and building houses is what they do.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Have you tried a local community college for classes? You might also check out stores that sell tools and wood. Woodcraft, for example, offers classes in my area. A couple good books will also help. For example:
Woodworking Basics: Mastering the Essentials of Craftsmanship by Peter Korn. This is an excellent book for a beginner, particularly as you want to eventually build furniture.
Build something Simple first. Success begets Success.
It sounds like you are not setting out to be a tool junkie, but beware advice to buy a $1500.00 cabinet saw. You don't need it now, and you may never need it. The Korn book will walk you through some simple projects using hand OR power tools OR both.
Good Luck and, whatever you do, Have Fun.
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Please assist
Buy tools and supplies only as project require. Buy the best you can afford. Invest in books and videos. Take classes if available. Befreind a local handyman for advice. Most of all, dive in there and do it yourself.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

I'd start by finding something you need and building it. Have a mess of tapes and DVDs? Building shelves to store them is an easy project but it will give you a chance to work on joinery.
I'm a big fan of squares and my coping saw. With those tools, definately go for the mid-to-upper price range tools. There's a few wRECkers who have had bad experiences with coping saws, but mine's been all good.
You might want to look for a TV show called "Toolbelt Diva." It's a beginner level show, and a halfway decent starting point.
If you have only two power tools, I'd make them a cordless drill/driver and a circular saw. You can make just about anything with those tools and a bit of thought. (That's not to say the other tools aren't worth having. It's just that your three basic operations of drilling, cross cutting, and ripping can be done with a drill/driver and circular saw. The other tools generally make repetition easier.)
Puckdropper
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: I have no training

Look up the nearest carpenters union hall. Call the HS and ask about adult ed. programs (not all school districts have them). Wander on to a small (residential?) building site and chat up the guys there. Less likely, but still possible, drop by the nearest Home Depot to inquire about classes.
A deck, especially if it is tied to the house but even if not, can be a pretty ambitious first project. Start something simpler first to acquire some basic skills (you can teach yourself an awful lot!). A simple bench nailed together from 2x4's and 2x6's with a coat of wood stain or paint slathered on, is a reasonable place to begin.
There are on-line tutorials to learn how to use a carpenters square and the simpler geometry to lay out the foundations for a structure.
Take a CC class 1) carpentry 2) industrial design 3)technical math.
There are lots of resources available to you. This newsgroup is just one of hundreds of ways to learn this trade.
Bill
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Replying to myself with an addendum:
Just a handful more thoughts to consider:
Start small. There are important lessons about geometry and joinery to be learned in making a birdhouse, napkin holder or shadow box.
Perpendicularity. Parallelism. Reflexive angles. Complementary angles. Dados. Butt joint. Lap joint. Miter joint(s). Dovetail joints. Box joints ... just to name a few. There really IS no end to the learning (at least none of US have lived long enough to find it) so don't let it faze you ... the learning is one of the fun parts of the journey.
Learn those lessons on small pieces of free wood if you can. Keep in mind that you have to be careful when using any tool and the more so if it is a power tool. Keep the merthiolate and a few adhesive bandages nearby for the small accidents and either work in the presence of someone else or (second best) always work within a very few steps of a telephone for that day when the 'oopsie' isn't minor. I hope you never need EMS ... but if you do, speed in calling them can be critical to the outcome.
Find a hammer that fits your hand when you hold it near the end of the handle. Get yourself a good-quality tape measure. It will be easy to read, solidly built and not burdened with a lot of gee-gaws. Get the basic model with a spring return and a wide blade.
Focus on the skills, not the tools. The best craftspeople can produce better results from iffy tools than a poor craftsman can obtain with the very best tools available.
If you sharpen only one tool this week, make it the one between your ears.
It's very late and I'm very tired. I don't want to impose burdens, but safety HAS to be a part of EVERY calculation you make in this trade. Sooner or later, carelessness is always punished. So don't be careless.
Bill
Oh ... and welcome to w wRECk!
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Had to laugh at that one. Saw a flyer at my local HD about a router seminar they were having. Arrived at the appointed time, inquired at the desk and they looked at me like I was a goddamned crazy idiot. I then casually pointed to the flyer they had on their wall. The good news is that the people with whom I was speaking were well informed about what was going on in the store. Unfortunately, they didn't have a clue about what was SUPPOSED to be going on in the store.
So just cuz they say there is, even spend some bucks advertising about it, don't expect it will happen.
A.M. Wood
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Hey neighbor! I'm in Marysville Ohio myself. You've already found a great source of information here with this group. Marysville HS does not offer adult woodworking classes, just for students (the boy is taking woodshop this semester). Columbus State may be offering some woodworking classes in the near future. In fact, a friend of mine (who is not really a woodworker) may be teaching the class and has asked me if I'd be interested in assisting with teaching the "hands on." I've been a carpenter for close to 20 years and making furniture the last 10. I'd be glad to get you started on the basics. Perhaps we could get together? I've a wood shop set up and have a good library of books your welcome to use. There are also a number of other resources I know of for wood ,etc. I live on Bear Swamp Rd. If you (and the husband) are not busy one night this week, feel free to stop by. I'm at 937-537-1172. Take care, --dave

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SNIP
Well, I have to say I am a little floored. What a generous offer that is to someone you have never met. Well done, Dave.
Mick - you should >really< consider the offer. Nothing will get you kick started faster than to have someone at your side showing you exactly how to do some of the processes in a correct and safe manner. I cannot express to you how much that offer is worth, especially at this starting point in your woodworking efforts.
Robert
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Finding the keyboard operational snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com entered:

I don't post alot here because I usually need more advice then I have knowledge but since you are just starting out there is one lesson that took me a while to learn is that in addition to decks and furniture, woodworkers make scrap. Especially when just starting out. Don't get discouraged when the piece you just cut is too small. We've all done it and will do it again. Learn from everywhere. On TV watch Hometime, New Yankee Workshop, This Old House, Woodworks and a bunch of others. There is a show called "Toolbelt Diva" that is geared toward women. It has helpful hints for getting the right tools for smaller hands. Hit the library. Sunset Books, August Homes. Video tapes an DVDs are available, some at the library. Magazines like Fine Woodworking, Woodworker and others, again at the library. Above all ask questions. I guarantee that there are a bunch of other people that will have the same question but won't ask. One other thing. Before you even start your deck get a hold of your local building department. There may be local ordinances that you have to follow. The building dept. is not the enemy, they are there to help you. Bob
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Sure you can do it. And it will be rewarding. My first purchase as a college kid beginner was hand tools. I then bought a book about some simple projects. It started you out by recommending hand tools and a first project of a hipped tool box of wood. It was just four pieces of wood nailed and screwed together but I still have that thing and it is still holding my first hand tools. That was 1973.
I then scrounged wood from construction sites(watch out for nails and sharp objects) and used it to build some crude tables and shelves. Then I bought a circular saw and things really got interesting.
I got so interested that I took a community college course from a local remodeling contractor and at the end he offered me a job. He taught me how to build home frames, decks, cabinets, and other stuff. By using his tools I learned not only how to do the work but what tools I liked to use and what some of the good brands were.
Doing a deck would be a great exercise in cutting and framing and in supporting your framing with posts and concrete. When you do it you will enjoy being on it even more than if you had it done. And you will save money as long as you watch your safety rules. The world of tools has come a long way in being easier to use over the last decade or two.
There is also at least one line of hand tools just for women. I don't remember the name of it but it was created by a female carpenter and "handyperson". See... I can be politically correct.
Go get em.
Ron T
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You've got some great feedback from some of the finest craftsmen around, and that's worth a lot.
My addition would be to mention Popular Woodworking, a periodical that you can find probably about anywhere. PW is one source, and there are likely others. In the last issue I bought, there were some projects that were very daunting, and they also had a feature called "I Can Do That".
Simple projects for the beginners that don't require a lot of skill or tools. Just a willingness to learn.
One of the things that I've found is that I need some pretty fast feedback on what I've done. It can be negative feedback, but it should be pretty quick regardless. These projects will give you that. It may be something that you look at and say "Oh, that's um.....nice." and never look at again. But you will have developed a skill that you didn't have before, and that's priceless.
Tanus
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
> I have always wanted to be a woodworker. Building furniture and making > house repairs. , building a deck is my main goal. I have no training > and want to know where to get started. I tried to email my local high > school but got no answer. I know I should go to class first. I live in > marysville, ohio and not sure where I can get classes, a good cost and > so forth. <snip>
Doubt the women's prison in Marysville would have anything for you.
Lew
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Decide what you would like to do and see if you could get a part time job in a cabinet factory or what ever you want to learn about. There is no substitute for hands on work to speed up the learning curve. Even if all you can get is sweeping up the floor keep your eyes open and ask a few questions (at the appropriate time) You will be amazed at what you can learn when observing the pros at there jobs.
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