New Yankee Workshop in Los Angeles/KCET

Though there was a thread in March regarding this subject I thought it would interest others to the response I received.
Apparently they find that because they have declining email/mail feedback, they have determined that the viewer interest has declined.
So how about helping out and sending email to one or more of the following and see if the tide can be turned: snipped-for-privacy@kcet.org snipped-for-privacy@kcet.org snipped-for-privacy@kcet.org
V Serve wrote:

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Or, you could let your dollars do the talking and donate with a dedication for what ever show you want to see.
They like all others respond to dollars
bruce wrote:

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"Randy" writes:

I absolutely refuse to donate money to PUBLIC television/radio, what ever.
The operative word is PUBLIC, let them get their money from the PUBLIC trough.
Just my thoughts.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
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    Greetings and Salutations..
On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 04:55:12 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

funding for NPR, in spite of the fact that it is a drop in the bucket of the flood of money that the Feds hose away. It seems like the Republicans get in, and cut funding...(because the medium is too elitist, or, biased or whatever) then, when the Democrats get in, they either continue the cuts, or, conveniently forget to try and restore funding.     It seems like most of the attitude now is "If it has public support, then, it should be able to get enough funding from private sources to survive". Now, the Kroc estate pumped a chunk of cash into NPR, and, while it was one of their smaller bequests, it was still a great and helpful thing.     However, that did not help our local NPR stations...that was only applied to the National organization. The fundraising drives that annoy us once or twice a year are there because Federal funding for local stations has dropped a huge percentage. IT costs a chunk of change just to keep the transmitter on the air, and staff to keep the station going, much less to produce content to add to the mix.     The question is now, and, always has been, "how important is the alternative programming provided by Public Radio/TV stations to YOU?". If it is important and adds to the quality of your life, then, each of us should take on the reponsibility of helping keep it going on that local level.     I, for one, think that the content provided by the public broadcasting stations available to us does, indeed, add an important alternative view to our lives. Some folks feel that the proliferation of channels available on cable and other media have filled the niche that used to be reserved for NPR stations. WHile there is some validity to that view, I don't think that it is true enough that Public stations should disappear entirely. A vast majority of the programming available on the alternative channels is profit motivated, and, constrained by the same rules that have made broadcast television such a vast wasteland.     As a small example...Ken Burn's Civil War series, which is probably one of the most evocative and complete examinations of that period of American history was not funded by a cable channel...but by Public Broadcasting. I suspect that if it HAD been done by a commercial entity, it would have been shorter, had a lot more "eye candy", and, far less interesting. It was not "commercial"...but it was a great success. There are many other examples of programming which would be difficult or impossible to do on a commercial channel, but, which are supported by Public Broadcasting.     By the by..."supporting public broadcasting" does not simply mean writing a check, although that might be the easiest way. To keep this from being TOTALLY off topic, one of my contributions a few years ago was a toy, wooden pickup truck that I made. It was used as a premium/thankyou gift for one of the generous contributors, and, was quite popular. Most PBS stations do this sort of thing, and, would be more than happy to take an item for auction, or as a premium...Every little bit helps.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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"Dave Mundt" writes:

<snip a commentary from some one who appears to have an inside perspective>
It is my understanding that it was the Nixon administration that tried to cut funding because NPR was covering the Watergate hearings on a continuous basis.
It is also my understanding that those who listen to public radio/television basically split down the middle on a conservative/liberal mix.
IMHO, the executives of public broadcasting have lost the will to fight for what I believe is the proper source of funding for their operations.
I don't know about your area, but here in SoCal, "begging" by public stations seems to be their primary function.
40 years ago, Newton Minnow described broadcast television as a "vast wasteland".
IMHO, it is still a valid observation.
Lew
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<<40 years ago, Newton Minnow described broadcast television as a "vast wasteland".>>
And as a reward, he had a ship named after him. But it got lost at sea on a three-hour tour.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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If there's one thing that drives me nuts, it's those PBS beg-a-thons! I turn on the TV to watch NYW, but instead of Norm, I get some all-day Yoga "special programming". Why in the heck would anyone financially reward PBS for screwing with the programming half a dozen times a year?!?!
And it's not like they do it for 1 weekend a month - they go on for a month at a time.
Personally, I much prefer watch NYW on HGTV and putting up with a couple of DIY related commercials. Besides, it's not like PBS doesn't have money coming in from commercials. What do you call all those things before and after each program?? As much as I like the Delta & PC promos before NYW - they are commercials and PBS is getting paid to put them there.
These guys are making a killing while professing poverty:
- they get money for commercials - they call them program sponsors - they get money from cable and satellite service providers who carry their broadcasts - they get money from you
Not bad eh?
Brian

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On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:19:01 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:
Hi Dave glad to see you again. I still remember very kind of you helping me to get my Crapsman going. Beside keeping the crapsman, I bought 4 Oldham 1040 Signatures Series saw blade and a 14" bandsaw. Thanks!
Not to get off the subject, I agree with what you said below. I watch and listen PBS, NPR and C-Span more than any other stations. Beside Ken Burn, I like Nova, Washington Review, Jim Lehrer's News Hours, Charlie Rose, BBC News and Now with Bill Moyers.

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    Greetings and Salutations....

Glad to hear things are working well for you.

broadcast on PBS/NPR, I do think it is important to have a diversity of views. Which, parenthetically, is why I think EVERYONE should go see "Fahrenheit 9/11". Whether or not one agrees with Moore's point of view, it raises some questions well worth asking.     One of my comments about the proliferation of cable channels, which I am sure I have said elsewhere, is that having 14 channels presenting a range of conservative views is NOT better or "more diverse" than having ONE channel with strongly conservative views. We have to have that synthesis of opposing views to be able to come to an understanding of the issues and to be able to find the "best" path to deal with them.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

The "public" would be us. Other "non-public" stations get money from ad revenue.
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