new workshop


I'm experiencing a common problem trying to work out of my 2 car garage. In addition to moving all the equipment and workbench our of the way each night, the garage is built in (under) the house, resulting in a low ceiling (about 7 feet). I want to add on a 20 X 30 workshop wit enough ceiling height, but the prices I'm getting are at least twice what I can afford to pay. I've been looking at some of the larger sheds, barns, garage kits, etc. I'd like to have a wooden floor but don't know what kind of foundation I would need. The barn kits look like they lie on 4X4 pressure treated. I don't think that would last long before the western NY frost heaves the building. Does anyone have any experience, recommendations regarding these kits?
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Metal buildings are quick and cheap and can be insulated. There are many reasonably attractive designs, as long as you don't have neighborhood regulation or wife problems. A slab is $4-6/sf arouund here, but I don't know youur labor rates. You can save quite a bit if you get some buds to help you form and trowel it. If it's not too big you can handle the screeding, but it's nice if one person knows what they are doing. You can rent the power trowel for finishing. Be sure to put in anchor bolts as required by the building. I expect you will have to meet some sort of code, since you aren't a farm, so check on the need for footings. It's cheapest to just dig the footings and pour them integral with the slab. Get a couple of bids before you dive in yourself. Someone may be hungry and you are not under pressure. I have gotten concrete from drivers who have unaccepted loads they are going to have to dump. If you get the forms ready and talk to the companies, something may show up. You get about 80sf of slab per yard of concrete, making the concrete cost about $1/sf, plus maybe 4 yards for the footings (12"X12") all around. So $600 for floor and $350 for footings. Let us know what you find out. Wilson

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Hey Builder, What does your local codes provide for? This needs to be answered first. Dave
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I don't think they'll allow a steel building unless it's disguised very well. There are several detached 2-car garages in the neighborhood. I was thinking that I should keep it at one story and shaped more or less like a 2 car garage. I've seen ads for 16X32 kit buildings but I'd like to go a bit wider to 20 or even 24. The house is sided with Dryvit (artificial stucco) and I could get the guys back to do the same to the shop. The plan I started out with was a 20W X 30L with 8 foot walls and coller ties at about 10 feet to give the ceiling clearance I need. It would have been attached to the end of a 24 foot wide building and have a 5:12 hip roof to match the existing building. That's the one that came in way too expensive (about $40,000). This building would require 70 linear feet of foundation and footer. I think that's where all the money is going but I'm not sure. Rather than give up, I was looking at the kit buildings. There's a 20 X 24 vinyl sided garage kit with a floating concrete pad in the paper for about $10,000. I was hoping to use a plywood floor over 2X10 joists on piers. I was planning to use PEX heating tubes with reflectors under the plywood. The floor would have to have enough clearance underneath to allow for ventilation and be well insulated. The Dryvit uses a 1 1/2 inch styrofoam backer. Adding that to fiberglass between the 2X4 studs should be enough for the walls, 9 inches in the floor and 9 to 12 in the ceiling should be enough. I planned to try to keep the temperature just above the dewpoint when I'm not in the shop, to eliminate the rust problem. I'm rambling and don't know if this give you a clear picture. On the other hand, I'm here to find out what others have done.
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"BuilderBob46" snip

Dryvit is not even allowed for home use in some cities here in SoCal.

If my plan was to stay in the house for sometime, I'd go ahead and build a proper garage/shop that would be an asset to the property as opposed to a future liability.
Dave
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Surprised about the Dryvit. It's real popular here for commercial and starting to catch on for residential. I know about the horror stories regarding improper installation and rotting wood.
I suppose $40K is just a drop in the bucket for SoCal homes but in Western NY you can buy an older 2400 sq. ft. home for that much money. $40K is a big investment and the only guaranteed return would be the satisfaction of use. I wouldn't get close to the investment back in a future sale. I must admit, my original plan is the way I want to go but can't bring myself to parting with that much money for a hobby. (wouldn't be anything left for the hobby).
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Dryvit has two big problems. One is the moisture that collects behind it and the mold issues (which I believe are way over rated) and the poison gas that is emitted when it burns, and man, does it burn!
You might consider visiting alt.building.construction and see if you can get suggestions from builders in your area. You just might find a way to build it for less money. Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net says...

$40k seems high. i'm at less than half that with the pole building i had constructed in dec. '04. i've posted the details of it on my website, if you're intersted.
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greg (non-hyphenated american)
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