New work shop ideas ...

I have a unique opportunity with our current move; to build a purpose built work shop. I am starting with a 24' x 24' garage plan with stairs to "loft" storage. Building will be insulated and have heat pump HVAC.
Given a similar opportunity and from your experience what do you suggest I incorporate into this effort. It will include a quality TS (Griz or maybe the new Sears), drill press, jointer, etc. Quality wood working is the objective.
TIA
--
LoboMike

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I would suggest Powermatic if you can afford it. This is not disposable equipment like Griz and does not so much to repair as Sears.

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"Incoming!!!"
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Yeah - incoming!
William: When is the last time you actually touched or operated a Grizzly machine like the 1023s cabinet saw? When I started the selection process to upgrade to a cabinet saw about three years ago, I was pretty much predisposed to Unisaw. I had used one in a college cabinetry class during the late 70's and was very impressed. When I actually looked at one three years ago I was very disappointed. Delta must have replaced some of their engineers with accountants! Powermatic was nice, but out of reason for my home shop.
I will admit all manufacturers have dogs in their product lines. This goes for Grizzly, Delta, Jet, etc. But, two years ago I removed my 1023s from the carton, assembled it and dug out my measurement tools to set it up. After about an hour of checking and measuring I put the tools back into the cabinet - didn't need to change anything. I have repeated this a couple of times during the past year or so - same result. My son in law had a similar experience with his G0500 Jointer - a great looking machine.
1) The reason Griz can sell for less is they don't have three or four levels of markup. They sell direct. They also offer a basic unit like the 1023s without extended rails, side table, mobile base and other equipment that many do not want or have room for. If you subtract the cost of the bric-brac the Griz and Unisaw prices are closer than you think. 2) If you look at the list of Griz users, it includes small, inexperienced companies like Boeing, Raytheon, Toyota, General Electric, etc. It also include manufacturer's of some of the best quality musical instruments in the world like Gibson Musical - these folks demand accuracy in wood manufacturing. 3) We might as well get over this Chinese offshore thing. We live in a world market and the Chinese are starting to kick our machine-tool butts like the Japaneese did with cars a couple of decades ago (This resulted in much better American cars.). 4) Griz might be manufactured offshore but the employ a lot of people at three locations in the US. By the way, they have a good reputation for customer support. I have never had to call them about repair or parts; but they had my saw, on dock, 36 hours after I place an internet order.
Suggestion for both William and Mike: If you call the Grizzly product support line they will probably give you names and phone numbers of two folks in your area that have recently bought a 1023 or similar equipment. Go touch one, turn the cranks, talk to the owner and use it a little. Then let us know if it is worth the $600 - $1,100 premium you pay of Unisaw or Powermatic marketing.
There. I feel a hell of a lot better.
Ron

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Ron, How well does the 1023 do at containing dust?
Phil
RonB wrote:

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Sorry about the rant but it felt kinda good.
It does fairly well. I am not hooked up to a dust collection system, but the cabinet probably contains 80-90% of the dust. I open the side door every day or so and vacuum a pretty good quantity of dust and debris. The rest ends up on the table top or around the base. I am sure that when I get a collection system it will pull more of it into the cabinet and to the collector. If you buy one I strongly recommend the side motor cover. Without it, you would get a lot more outside of the cabinet.
Ron

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I've been collecting design ideas for woodworking shop layouts. The project is in its infancy but you might get some ideas from it. http://home.comcast.net/~hchute/woodshop_shoplayouts.htm
- Harvey

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Thanx good tip,
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LoboMike

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If you're going to have a concrete floor you should consider where you're going to place the tablesaw, jointer, and other machines which will not be along a wall. This will allow you the chance to put in-floor electric and dust sucker ducting in the slab. If you are planning wood floors and will have access to the bottom, this is a moot point.
Also, assuming this will be a detached building, a toilet and a sink can come in real handy. Especially during foul weather.
Art

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That sounds like a nice shop. We make furniture and the big tools I would get at first are:
Table saw, jointer, planer, drill press with a mortise attachment, and a bandsaw. You can make tons of stuff with just those tools. Buy the best you can afford, so you don't have to buy them again later.
For power hand tools I would get a belt sander with a sanding frame, a random orbital sander, palm sander, router, cordless drill.
That should start you off okay, unless I forgot something. That is really all you need to get going. I have had the same basic tools for years and don't really feel the need to get anything else... except for the occasional toy. :-)
James
Makers Of Small Table Making Software http://www.knightlite.com/creative

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Thanx everyone for the help.
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LoboMike

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