New woodworking show

PBS has a new show that your PBS station can broadcast. The show is called Woodworking Together and features the very first woman to host a true woodworking show. You can see a preview here:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid 99733913251364374&hl=en or
http://youtube.com/watch?v=XwMXYK0dI4A

Please take a minute to write your local PBS station and ask them to carry this show. You can use the PBS station finder to find your PBS station http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html
A formal announcement is on Gail's website http://www.hometownwoodworking.com/Woodworking%20Together.html
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Not to be too crass here, but aren't we all a little past whether the presenter has a box or balls? I personally don't give crap whether it is a woman or not, and I am tired of some women thinking that because they simply have a different genital configuration they are special.
If she is a talented, well versed craftsman, she will be fine. NOT because she has a box, but because she is an informative and her program is well presented. It would be nice to see a good woodworking show for a change, but I don't want to hear anymore about how her gender affects woodworking than I do Norm's.
If you want to sell her program to a predominately male audience based on the fact that it "features the very first woman to host a true woodworking show" you should have Carmen Electra do the show.
The clip was as others have pointed out, a strange trip into The Twilight Zone, in presentation, format, style of construction, and the Yankee accent.
Is anyone really sure this isn't Norm's daughter?
Robert
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With the liberal use of the brad nailer, I was going to say Nahm's wife...
Allen
wrote:

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Norm in drag...
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In that case, Norm has got a nice rack.....
jo4hn wrote:

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Looking a the trailer, it looks like a female version of Norm, down to the accent and assembly approaches. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
No reason to get excited about it though, it'll just show for a couple of weeks between beg-a-thons.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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I always wondered about the money aspect of PBS. TOH and New Yankee are two PBS shows that have been sold to for profit stations and it looks as though Discovery and History channels borrow a lot from Nova and other PBS shows. Do these stations pay PBS, WGBH or Morash?
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PBS shows that have been sold >to for profit stations and it looks as though Discovery and >History channels borrow a lot from Nova and other PBS >shows. Do these stations pay PBS, WGBH or Morash?-
The folks that own their respective percentages of the shows are indeed reimbursed. These are ways to keep the cost of PBS down, as it keeps down the cost of production. There are different agreements that bind each party to content and use of logos and names, but essentially (from my understanding) the producers and the affiliated producers (such as WGBH for Charlie Rose) own the show. They can distribute these shows under the guildelines of their agreement.
A few years ago it was not that way, and the actual PBS stations (or group of them) that sponsored the shows were not compensated for any further distribution of shows they helped produce.
According to a friend of mine that worked at our local PBS station a few years ago, the precedent for today's business model between PBS and the programs it sells has been set by no other than that big purple meatball, Barney. A Dallas Texas PBS station helped financially produce, create and develop the show, and it was sold to and shown by other PBS stations. As most know, it became an instant hit.
However, at that time PBS received no monies from any of the videos, dolls, DVDs, or anything else that had Barney's likeness. With the show well established, the creators threatened to sell it to ABC or some other network, and cut PBS out all together.
IIRC, they settled that one in court.
But the thing they couldn't stop was the sale of the programs overseas, the sale of the likeness, DVDs and tapes, use of logos, images, etc. Again, IIRC, the Dallas newspaper reported that the creators sold something like 60 million in one year (at the zenith). PBS got nothing from those sales although the creator freely admitted that without PBS there would be no Barney. At its inception, no network expressed any interest at all in the show.
I have been led to believe that the new business model is one of a partnership, and credits and monies are shared by both parties.
As a fan of PBS for many, many years, I can tell you that Discovery/ Learning/National Geographic/and History all buy and redit from PBS, and have for years.
Here's a great example: watch American Experience's "The Building of the Brooklyn Bridge" by Ken Burns on PBS. Then watch the same show on The History channel, just 18 minutes or so shorter. Even the same narrator...
Just a third shorter.
Robert
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