New Woodworker

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<<<<BUZZER<<<<<
Wrong guy. You are confusing me with Stoutman. What *I* said at the beginning of the thread was:
"A good quality table saw with a good fence (I think Biesemeyer and clones are simple, cheap and rugged.) "
Then Stoutman responded that my suggestion was WAY over the top; that a Biesemeyer fence wasn't needed for quality work... that he was happy using a stick.
================ I support quality gear for the craftsmen because they will do a better job (Of course assuming they're up to the job to begin with.)
And you're right, you don't think like I do...just for different reasons than those you infer.
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Ever thought of going into politics? You'd fit right in.
wrote:

have
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..and what would compel you to utter such an insult?
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Byrd wrote:

I was in your boat about 12 years ago (but I was the new woodworker!!).
I has a few tools for around the house repairs and such, but when I decided to branch out, I did not know just what tools I needed (wanted!!!) so rather then just buy a bunch of tools (and waste my money) I decided to buy tools as I needed them. Believe it or not the first major tool was a good drill press (I needed to accurately drill some holes and after using my Porter Cable hand drill without a lot of success) I bought the drill press.
The only "real" wood working tool I had was 10 year old radial arm saw and circular saw. I started reading magazines and buying books to understand all of the tools that were available and what they were used for. Especially important were the tool reviews/comparisons in magazines (Fine Woodworking, Popular Woodworking, American Woodworker to name a few). I started with simple projects like your sons wants to do.
Others in this news group will go through the list of needed tools all of which are based upon personnel use and choice so I won't repeat the good advise that will be provided here. I do strongly believe that your son should buy the best tools he can afford but don't buy cheap (just to have the tool) off brand stuff that may not last or may injure someone because it is of marginal quality. It is better to wait and spend more $$ for a good tool that will last for many years rather than junk (and there is a lot of junk out there). Finally, getting good tools will reduce the frustration having to deal with a tools marginal accuracy and enable your son to really enjoy the woodworking hobby. Oh yes one more thing, if he can, have him subscribe to this newsgroup, he will find a great bunch of people here that more then willing to assist with any questions he may have. Especially about what tools to buy :-).
Marty
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Hi Martin,
The *cheapest* way to get into woodworking is to find a school with a woodshop that will let him use it. (The local college here has a woodshop with nice tools for $45 / three month membership.) If he really gets into woodworking he can wean himself off of the school's shop by slowly buying the tools he uses the most there. This strategy may help him avoid the mistake of buying tools he rarely uses...
SailorDave
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