New vs. old unisaw

I recenly got a super deal on an old unisaw. ($350) Probably from the 50s or 60s. Assuming it is not wore out, I am wondering how this machine stacks up against the newer models? I have noticed that the only plastic on it is the cord.
Any opoinions will be appreciated and taken with a grain of salt.
thanx
Russ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fella at work didn't bother to ask until after he bought. So far:
$200 for the saw
Came with: no side wings no handles no blade nut or flange original fence system 3 phase motor worn out heaters in motor starter
This thing will run over a $1000 before it is ready.
To answer your question: The things have not changed since dirt, the parts are all still available. You did not get hurt if the saw is functional. Some of the fun of owning can be maintaining and resurrecting.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
A live Singing Valentine quartet,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When all done, $1000.00 for a saw put together the way you want with the components you want is a great deal.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A tablesaw is a very simple device. They haven't changed much in 100 years and then, only in details. Anything that could be worn on it can be replaced. Yes, you got a good deal.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The new Unisaws offer a left-tilting blade and the fence system has been much improved. The on-off switch is different also. You can not change the tilt but you can buy an aftermarket fence to match what is being offered on the new ones. In my opinion you got a good deal so long as the trunion is not cracked or has broken gear teeth and the table is flat. Cracked gear teeth can be brazed and reformed but there is not a lot you can do with a non-flat table (Notice to nitpickers: Yes. I know about surface grinding but I also know what machine shops get for this sort of work). I am sure you would have no trouble reselling it for the price you paid--even if the table is out a few thousandths.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nitpick alert:
http://www.moglice.com/newsite/pages/straighttalk.html
Not a lot of difference between cast-iron ways and cast-iron saw tops.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't see the relevance here. Are you suggesting that he scrape it flat? If so, that is not realistic. Any amount of unflatness in a tablesaw table that would be of any concern to the operation of the machine would be far more than scraping would help.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't?
I was poking fun at the flatness guys, actually. I've seen about a million threads where someone is agonizing over a table that is .003" out of flat over a 50 inch span. A guy *could* hand scrape that, but you'd have to really be worked up about it to make it worth your time.
What's really not realistic is the idea that a table saw needs to be that flat in the first place. There's a point where it is unsafe or unusable, but a stationary saw rarely gets to that point. A cheap benchtop that has been thrown carelessly into the back of a work truck for five years or so gets to that point- not a big cast-iron Unisaw.
To sum it up, an unrealistic expectation demands an unrealistic repair! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK. I just didn't see where you were going with this. I agree with you completely. I just set up a new saw this weekend. Out of the five or six dial and test indicators I have, all of them are in my toolbox, at work (Ed Bennett's not going to like this). The strait edge I used for setup was made of oak, planed strait with a #5. After zero setting the fence, I made three cuts at various fence settings to check the accuracy. All were on within .005 (did use dial caliper for this measurement). That Vega fence is great.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Russ:
You got a pretty good deal if any 5 of these 6 things are true:
The table is relatively flat Both extension wings are present The motor works You have the flavor of electricity the motor likes (you didn't say if it's single or 3-phase) The arbor, trunions, and other mechanical pieces are not damaged You have materials and skills to make replacements for what's missing (fence, guard, etc.)
Perhaps my experience might be relevant here:
I did the same thing about a year ago - bought a 1960's vintage Powermatic 66 for $175 at a public school auction. It was well worn, rusty and dirty. The fence was junk. The motor was 3-phase, and its fan was broken. I did check it before bidding - top flat withn 0.010, trunions and racks sound, etc. I figured the motor was dead, so I didn't plan on going above $300 for it.
I spent 2 days cleaning the pitch buildup off the innards. I replaced the arbor bearings ($22). I scrounged in the back room of a local motor shop for a new motor fan (free). I already had a used VFD (from a dumpster at work) to convert my 220V single-phase to 3-phase (free). I bought 3 new, matched V-belts from NAPA ($28). I spent another 2 days reassembling, adjusting out backlash, aligning, etc. I spent about $30 on a few pieces of hardware and used a bunch of material I had sitting around to build a Beisemeyer-style fence over about a 2-week period. I spent another day to program the VFD, mount it in an enclosure and hook up controls, etc. I bought a new Excalibur Merlin splitter ($99), a pair of Board Buddies ($38), a zero- clearance insert ($20) and a new Freud thin-kerf blade ($45). Throw in $25 for cleaning supplies, paint, etc.
The result - my saw is at least as good as a new one, but for $482 and about 40 hours labor spread over almost 2 months. The table and extension wings are flat within 0.008. The blade is parallel to the miter slots within 0.002 at any tilt angle. The VFD allows for smooth start and rapid stop of the blade. My fence works great - better than a Beis, because the main rail has 2 T-slots along the entire length of every side. I made my fence rails long enough for a big extension table, which I now have a router mounted in. Because I was fortunate to have lots of the stuff already, most of which was free cast-offs from work, it was mostly just time and effort. Had I bought a single- phase motor and new Beis fence, I would have spent about $900 total, which wouldn't have been such a great deal.
One more thing - it's kinda nice to know that I rebuilt it with my own hands every time I use it.
Regards, John.
On Jan 27, 2:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@osuchialpha.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Just curious but why would a guy with the talent to do all that you did (I am truly impressed) buy a zero-clearance insert when they are so easy to make. I usually whip out several at the same time--even drill and put in 4 allen screws for leveling.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Joe:
I was in a hurry, and already in Woodcraft with a gift card in my hand, and I didn't want to "spend the time" making one just then. FWIW, by the time I added a kerf for the splitter, and clearance for the arbor nut and splitter mount at 45 degree blade tilt, I could have made one from scratch. I've made a few more inserts from scratch since then, using my purchased one as a template.
Regards, John.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Could be a really good deal, you may want to check this site: http://www.sawcenter.com /
Lots of good information about your saw.
Sawdust Making 101 http://sawdustmaking.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 Jan 2007 11:54:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@osuchialpha.com wrote:

Oh man, that thing has got to be wore out by now- everyone knows those old Unisaws were fit for little more than slicing bread anyhow.
Tell you what, I'll take it off your hands for what you paid for it. :)
Seriously, though- nice drive-by gloat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here's a Unisaw going for $150, at the moment. Don't know what it will eventually go for, though. I'm not affiliated, in any way, with this sale. http://www.irsauctions.com/index_lots.asp?pg tails&id58
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.