New TS regulations will require Riving Knives on future saws in the US

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Yup, a biesemeyer type splitter is on the wish list. For now, I'm using the much cheaper Lee Valley Tools MicroJig Splitter. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pQ151&cat=1,41080,51225&ap=1
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wrote in message

I use the MJ Splitter also. FIY there is a much more heavy duty version although the microjig.com web site still does not show it. I bought the HD version at the last WW show in April. It fits in larger holes and tapers down to the 1/8" and 3/32" width above the table insert. The HD version is stainless steel covered in translucent plastic.
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Leon wrote:

My MJ's kept popping out, and eventually broke, so I switched to a shop-made white oak splitter glued into the zero-clearance insert. To remove the splitter, I swap inserts.
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That is what I complained about at the WW show. That is when they pulled out the new stainless steel reinforced version. So far So good.
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Regardless, both come into play and must be delt with.
I'm > one who keeps that 32nd extra on the far end of the fence, and I usually

The problem I have with that is that the waste side of the cut tends to come in contact with the back side of the blade. The then requires the waste side, "if it is going to be used as a keeper" to be run through the jointer to smooth the edge be fore running through the saw again. Properly set up you should never have to run the board through the jointer after a TS cut to clean up an edge.
Optimum situation which is sometimes frustrated by the

Agreed/
Where is it that you think a kick back will not get you? I have seen kick backs come over the top of the fence. Any where behind the blade is a vulnerable spot, some more than others.
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Oh hogwash. If you push the piece straight ahead, it doesn't contact the blade on the waste side. Unless you overfeed and the blade squirms. Not to mention that it's a good practice to rip oversize to allow for a tad of strain relief on the wood, especially where the grainis changing angles fast relative to the surfaces.

So don't stand behind the blade, stand to the side where the switch is located.
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LOL If your fence is offset at the back end, you "can not" push the board parallel to the blade. The wood does in fact come in contact with the back side of the blade other wise what do you accomplish by off setting the fence.
Unless you overfeed and the blade squirms. Not to

Perhap a good practice for some but I absolutely never ever cut over size for the reason you stated.

I have stood some 2' to the right of blade, farther away from the blade than the switch, and have had a piece fly back at me up at a 45 degree angle from the blade.
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Though the term "kickback" is often used to describe a table saw flinging a piece of wood and the type that launches it straight back paralleling the sides of the saw blade(the Spear kickback) is the one most obvious one, the Flip and Fling is the one that can go almost anywhere that's not behind the blade.
The Flip and Fling involves ripping short pieces - about the length of the exposed blade above the throat plate. The part, being short, can rotate, even into the small gap between the rear teeth and a riving knife, and make contact with an uprward traveling rear tooth. This begins to lift the short piece off the table - and away from the fence. Once that begins, the part is thrown up into the upper teeth which can flip the part just about anywhere - including left and right of the center line of the arbor shaft. Kelly Mahler (I think that's the spelling) uses a piece of styra foam sheet to demon- strate the Flip and Fling. People are amazed at where the Flipped and Flung piece goes.
Bottom line is Proper Stock Preparation Proper Saw Set Up and Control The Stock
If what you're about to do makes you feel uncomfortable there's probably a reason. Try and come up with another way of doing the operation.
charlie b
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Great info, Charlie!
Also another reason for a good sled... I used to just use a sled for cross cutting but have started using one for ripping small or short pieces, also..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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The one that caught our attention was when the wife and eldest son were talking in the shop whilst I was trying to get the last bit of walnut cut, and then we'd go do something 'important'. The piece that caught the blade, flipped up and smashed the overhead light, before whacking me on the way down changed our plans a bit.
They left the shop, while I cleaned up in the semi-dark...
Patriarch
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wrote:

I know this is not technically advisable, but this is how I handle short pieces, where short is less than twice the length of the blade, that are too narrow to allow me to run my hand between blade and fence. Cut in half way, pull back out, flip end for end, cut the rest of the way. The stock never reaches the rear teeth so there is no chance of a kickback, and I would just prefer to have my hands on the stock rather than any other contraption for holding it otherwise whenever possible.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

Might want to check out The GRIPPERRRRR. Works really well ripping narrow and / or short pieces. Keeps your hand well above the blade and controls the stock ON BOTH SIDES OF THE CUT.
OR
you can make something similar out of scraps - and add a screen door handle to the top of it.
charlie b
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A long time ago, I experienced wood taking flight before it reached the rear teeth. If you're running wood along the fence and it becomes skewed in between the side of the blade and the fence, you're looking at a kick back in the making long before the rear teeth are reached.
As far as I'm concerned, kick backs and wood being thrown is a possibility despite most precautions. Yup, there's lots one can do to minimize those possibilities, but knowing that it *could* happen means always adopting protective measures and protective stances to lower those possibilities.
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Exactly!
Yup, there's lots one can do to minimize those

My #2 defense against any kind of kick back is to keep/insure a "firm" hold on the material being cut and use sharp blades. For what ever reason I sometimes feel the material lift and I have been able to keep the piece from flying back by simply exerting more downward pressure. With enough pressure the blade will simply cut into the material rather than catch it and throw it back. I like to think of this procedure as controlling the stock rather than poking it through with the end of a stick. By your description. it sounds like you use similar techniques.
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Yeah, but I'd just as soon not have kickback no matter where I'm standing... I've seen pictures of boards through shop walls, knocking things off shelves, etc... I can just picture kicking something back 12 or 15 feet and hitting the grill of the truck.. lol
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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What type of pusher are you using? The push stick recommended in the operator's manual is worthless, because it holds down the trailing end of the board, opposite the heel end where kickback forces are generated. Use a shoe type, with healthy grip to give you the best fighting chance once the kerf starts going wacky.
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Father Haskell wrote:

That'll take care of ONE potential causes of kickbacks. There are several more causes, some not so obvious. Ever had a board you're ripping "cross its legs" - behind the blade? How about having it "spread its legs" behind the blade - and push the back INTO the rear teeth - the ones coming UP out of the throat plate that'll try and lift the board UP into the teeth spinning TOWARDS YOU?
Being one who doesn't enjoy having wood try and kill me, I did a bit of research and some thinking and then put together the following for my own use. Figured once I'd done that the info might save someone else some grief so I put them on my site. Guess it's time to post the url to that stuff.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/KickBack/KickBack1.html

Or have a long unsupported board tilt up off the back of the table saw - raising the end up into the KILLER REAR TEETH.
Also not a good idea to be ripping a long board and have it stopped by some obstruction behind the saw. Hard to keep control of the board AND find the OFF switch.
How about if the back of your throat plate is just a hair lower than the table top - AND the part you're ripping deforms DOWN and the edge catches in that little step between the table top and the back of the throat plate?

That seems counter intuitive. The rear quarter of the blade has teeth pushing UP and at some point FOREWARD. The top front quadrant is pushing up and at some point DOWNWARD. Could you explain more please?
charlie b
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Look at a sawblade with positive rake. Very similar to a line of fishhooks, right? Remember why you're never supposed to reach over a spinning blade?
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Is there a riving knife available for a delta contractor saw. I was going to buy a couple of MJ stainless slitters from Peachtree. One for a throat plate with the blade all the way up 3.25" +- and one for the blade up 1".I now use a gripper for small parts and grip tite mag units when ripping long parts.
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safety guard fitted to the top of the riving knive. This means that you can only ose the TS for cutting completely through the wood. I suggest that if this is the case then you should get a second knive and adapt it so you can, if required just cut slots in wood or for cutting the lid on a box.

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