New TS regulations will require Riving Knives on future saws in the US

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If you are going to buy a new TS in the near future and think that there are too many safety devices on the TS's now, you better buy one now before the UL regulations require the new TS's to be equipped with a riving knife.
For the rest of us, this is probably good news.
The bait has been cast. ;~)
http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/PermaLink%2Cguid%2C9b634723-de5d-426f-b372-2c034afd30b9.aspx
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Leon wrote:

About freakin' time. Won't keep you from cutting off a finger or two, but will go a long way towards reducing the number of kickbacks and projectile wood. Hopefully they'll include a thin kerf and regular kerf riving knife with each new saw. Not sure what they'll come up with for stacked dado blades - which is why the Euro equivalent of OSHA doesn't allow table saws to hold stacked dado blades.
charlie b
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I'm confused, why would I need a riving knife to cut dados?
jim e
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snipped-for-privacy@charter.net wrote:

You don't. The riving knife keeps the kerf open behind the blade so it can't close and make contact with the rear teeth - the ones that typcially start a kickback.
Separate issue - dados - the EU OSHA doesn't allow "blind cuts" on a table saw - that is cuts like rabbets/rebates and dados.
charlie b
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charlieb wrote:

Just out of curiosity, how does one cut a dado in the EU? And stay in compliance with the safety regs? And why do they think a dado is more hazardous than just a blade?
David Starr
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With a router.

Since you can't see the blade, people have been know to push the wood through with their hand on top of the wood where the blade can come through or they can push it past the blade while part of their hand is hanging over. This type of accident has happened on router tables also.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

People have been known to run themselves over w/ their own automobiles, too... :)
There's a point at which one just has to say "be careful".
imo, etc., ...
--
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wrote in message

I know a guy with a commercial shop who dadoed one of his ring fingers off completely... I keep that in mind whenever I make blind cuts.
Long ago I started using a Biesemeyer T-Square Anti-kickback Splitter on my saws. The ability to easily remove and replace it encourages use. The factory splitters are too much of a hassle...
John
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The UK HSE recommendation for avoiding this is the use of "Shaw guards" or "tunnel guards".
They're illustrated here: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis16.pdf http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis17.pdf
Although they're not simple to construct (as an adjustable guard) and probably require both welding and drilled attachments to the machine table, they're worth having. Once you have them, they're certainly worth using. You can also lash-up a one-off for long batches, even if you don't make a neatly adjustable version.
The woodworking index of the HSE site is here: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/woodindx.htm
it's well worth the look.
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wrote:

They certainly do allow them -- although they don't like them, and they have strong recommendations on either avoiding them, or how to guard them.
And there isn't a single EU OSHA body anyway. Each country has its own, and they talk about harmonisation between them.
All of this stuff is _very_ well documented by a library of PDFs on the UK HSE site.
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wrote:

That's not the reason - it's related to spin-down times with a heavy blade stack (web search under "PUWER 98"). If you sort that problem, as big industrial saws have, then you can use dado sets.
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There seems to be a certain amount of confusion on that last point, Charlie. Stacked cutters are certainly available here (see http://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/details/8in-safety-dado-set-30mm-bore ) from several sources. I had heard on a woodworking program here that as long as the arbor on the TS was long enough to accomodate the cutters, then the set could be used. Can't find any definitive answers yet.
FoggyTown
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will go a long way towards reducing the number of kickbacks and projectile wood.

OH! I was going to ask WHAT a riving knife was until I read that, Charlie...
The Ridgid TS that I bought a few months ago has one, if I'm understanding you.. and I have no problem with it at all... also has an anti-kick back spur on each side of it, and I'm glad that they're there...
OTOH, when I'm doing dados, the whole assembly including the plastic blade guard comes off with one wing nut, which the new regulations might not allow..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Kickback ceased being a problem after I upgraded to a t-square fence and aligned it dead on parallel to the blade. Helps also to never leave a rip hanging between the fence and the heel of the blade.
As for taking off fingers, note that the front of the blade is less likely to pull your hand in than the heel of the blade.
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Completely untrue. A properly aligned fence can go a long way to preventing kickbacks, but it certainly does not entirely eliminate the possibility of it happening. Kickbacks can happen for other reasons than fence misalignment.
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Most of those reasons having to do with the rising back end of the blade, which that sharkfin shaped riving knife is designed to address. Honestly, though, the day I got my Biesemeyer dead aligned (with the help of a dial indicator) is the day kickback stopped.
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wrote in message

You still need to be cautious. If the board starts to close up behind the blade it can still pinch the blade and be thrown back at you. A heavy hand will help to prevent this but a dead parallel fence will not help in this matter.
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wrote in message

Missing the point. Feed problems are one thing, WOOD problems another. I'm one who keeps that 32nd extra on the far end of the fence, and I usually have a featherboard in my left hand to hold the fed piece to the fence just prior to the blade. Optimum situation which is sometimes frustrated by the wood twisting and kerf closing as one becomes two. Most expensive fence set with the most expensive device won't prevent problems there.
Still asking why anyone's standing in a place where a kickback piece could even get to them when cutting. Seems stupid. Stand where if it runs back it hits the wall, not you.
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There can be mitigating circumstances. I use a wheelchair and don't have the reach or capability to stand completely out of the way while still being able to control the feed of a length of wood. Yeah, I could do things like buying an automatic feeder or use other exotic machinery, but like most woodworkers, money is not in abundant supply with me.
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wrote in message

I generally agree with George regarding where you stand... it was drilled into my head as a kid. My father had served an apprenticeship as a tool and die maker and he passed some of the knowledge along... where to stand, don't brush chips off with your hand (metal mindset!), don't use the side of the grinding wheel, etc.
With the wheel chair in mind I'd certainly use something like a riving knife or a good splitter like the Biesemeyer T-Square splitter. This as there is no way you could get out of the way fast enough if there was a kick back nor would you have the body leverage to control a problem piece of wood. http://www.biesemeyer.com/safety/index.htm I've found the Biesemeyer splitter to be helpful with reaction wood that wants to close up the kerf during cutting. The only time I've had a problem with the splitter was when I didn't put it back in after using the cross-cut sled because I "only have to make one rip cut." I swear I'll never make only one cut without it again! ;~)
John
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