New tool invention

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As an aid to certain trades, serious amateurs, and those who don't already have a solution to stationary assistance, the tool certainly has a place. I have had 4 Workmates, still regularly use 2, and I have a Triton Superjaw. So, it is not for me. As a storage and transportable solution, it needs drawers, wheels etc. It is essentially an expandable workbench with a bench vice. I like that part. Great concept. Incomplete. The name is awful but a focus group could disagree. Names don't need to be descriptive, just memorable? It is probably just me.
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wrote in message

As an aid to certain trades, serious amateurs, and those who don't already have a solution to stationary assistance, the tool certainly has a place. I have had 4 Workmates, still regularly use 2, and I have a Triton Superjaw. So, it is not for me. As a storage and transportable solution, it needs drawers, wheels etc. It is essentially an expandable workbench with a bench vice. I like that part. Great concept. Incomplete. The name is awful but a focus group could disagree. Names don't need to be descriptive, just memorable? It is probably just me.
=============================================== ToolExtender? ;0
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I already said I loved it.
But, I don't see how it's going to sell for less that $350, though, which is probably too steep for the handyman. I see it as something a contractor *is* going to want, however.
I would have a hard time buying it without a set of legs, though. While the concept of using it on the pick-up bed is great, there are just too many situations where the truck can't be close enough to where you're working. And I use a minivan, anyway.
I know you show how it can be mounted on a portable tool dolly, but guys will be turned off knowing they have to spend another 100 bucks to use the thing. I suppose you should at least have an option for legs/wheels.
I suppose it could be the cornerstone product in an entire line, though. Those Dragons' Den investors are going to want to see a returning market for accessories and upgrades.
I could see myself, having your toolmule, on a wheeled, pop-up dolly system, with some sort of stop on the wheeled end, to use the whole thing as a tool box dolly for hauling tools/toolsboxes. Take the tools/boxes off the dolly, pop the legs down, get to work. That how the "mule" part of the name involved. :-)
And I like the name. catchy
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Apr 23, 10:19 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Love, I would prolly buy one or more. I gave my feedback on the web site.
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wrote in message

My wife uses one like it also, I will say it does not get much simpler and works well but cleaning is more trouble, naturally.
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Somebody wrote:

IMHO, a sharp chef knife, a decent cutting board, and 5 minutes time beats a garlic press hands down including reduced clean up time.
Have a press lying in a drawer that haven't used in years.
Lew
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Maybe I don't know what a garlic press is supposed to do. So far, I've been using the knife/cutting board route chopping it into fine bits. Forgetting about cleanup for the moment, I figured a garlic press would be faster. I presumed (maybe wrongly) that a garlic press mulches it up into fine paste so that it would disseminate into the mix faster than the chopped method. Am I mistaken?
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"Upscale" wrote: .

That makes two of us.

Works for me.

You already have the knife and cutting board in service just to clean the cloves.
Adding a press gets more equipment involved.

Speed is a relative thing.
I can't think of a recipe that uses garlic that would find finely chopped garlic unacceptable.
YMMV.
Lew
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Possibly a garlic press is capable of squeezing all the juice or essence out of a clove without having to clean away the outer shell. That would make it quite a bit faster I think.
Hey, don't any of you other woodworkers out there do any cooking? What exactly does a garlic press do?
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On Thu, 23 Apr 2009 17:36:26 -0500, Upscale wrote:

I have one, pretty much never use it, once I learned to just smash the clove with the knife flat, remove the skin, then finely chop, technically the knife just needs a quick wipe for a cleanup.
The garlic press, leaves a bunch of garlic crap, embedded into the blades, and around the sides of it, much more effort for cleanup, and definitely no difference as far as the upcoming garlicky good meal goes.
Just my two cents Canadian.
--
Froz...


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It reduces garlic to a pulp and extracted juices, as opposed to just smaller pieces of garlic. This is often preferable for making real garlic butter, dips, etc. Zyliss makes some good stuff, but their garlic press is only okay. Having used many over the years, I find this one far and away the best press:
http://tinyurl.com/dmq2qq
Holds several cloves, built like a tank, and has long handles for good ease-of-use leverage. Reasonably priced, too.
HTH nb
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I cook a lot. Mostly mediterranean dishes; Italian and Greek are my favourites. My spanakopitas and raviolis are to die for. I make my own pasta from scratch. No extraordinary skills, just some simple, solid recipes... and first grade ingredients. Some very basic methods include: NEVER cut your garlic buds. Crush only. NEVER go beyond a very, very light tint of distant amber when sauteing garlic. NEVER 'cut' lettuce, always break the stuff by hand. NEVER peel potatoes. ALWAYS wet your hands before handling garlic, for obvious reasons. Learn to cook with one hand... the other one is for handling wine.
Now I am farking hungry...damnit....
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"Robatoy" wrote:

Yep.
NEVER cut your garlic buds. Crush only.
Prefer to crush and cross cut.

Yep.
Yep.
New, "yes", old Russets, gotta peel them.

Me to.
Lew
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Russets are okay for......cattle feed?
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"Robatoy" wrote:

Actually wrong animal, at least it was 60 years ago when I worked the potato fields in the fall after school.
Back then, gov't subsidies were in play.
Free market price was about $0.01/lb for potatoes, but if you died them purple and sold them as hog feed, gov't subsidized with a payment to keep farmers going.
Back then, lots of crops were being subsidized including, winter wheat, shell corn, and oats.
There were others, maybe somebody else remembers that far back
OTOH, Russets are just fine in my galley for lots of spud dishes including home fries, fried, scalloped, potato soup, clam chowder, mashed, etc, etc.
Lew
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I deep (french) fried quite a few russets. They're pretty good for that. Now I'm hooked on Yukon Gold or mini reds.
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"Robatoy" wrote:

that. Now I'm hooked on Yukon Gold or mini reds.

Go to Emeril's section of the Food Network and find "Flo's Roasted Potato Salad".
Absolute Dine-O-Mite use of red spuds and produces a potato salad that has no equal IMHO.
Lew
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I love potato salad. German, Hussar, 'Russian Egg' (That;s translated from Dutch's Russisch Ei (Forgive my spelling, Han :-)). Cold, baby new potatoes, a wee bit of home-made mayo...
Now *I* am farking hungreeeeee
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But the dish is different from egg salad or potato salad. I had to look it up: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russisch_ei
I rather have my own version of deviled eggs - secret ingredient is to use some finely ground overdone bacon (or Baco's or generic equivalent) in the mashed up yolks, plus the usual ingredients, which I take from the Good Housekeping cookbook ca 1970.
We'll be at the Dutch house for a late lunch: http://dutchhousetavern.com /
--
Best regards
Han
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Ahhh, so those are just the eggs. In my home town ( Alphen aan den Rijn), they were served two half eggs, stuffed, upside down onto a bed of potato salad with a lot of veggies, like peas, celery mixed in. Two small dollops of caviaar on top of each egg.
Btw, that ain't no Dutch restaurant :-) Where are the: croketten boerenkool stamppot gehaktballen frikadellen nasi goreng bahmi goreng UITSMIJTERS?? well?
Huh?
Huh?
LOL.... (Just drove my in-line spellchecker to the therapist..)
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