New to router/woodworking

Hello, Maybe someone can help me with this. I'm trying to cut 7" squares, 3/8" deep in a pine board that is 38" long. I recently got a Ryobi fixed base with it's own bench table. I tried to do these squares free hand, but when I'm routing the inside of the square, there's no way to keep it level. I've routed out the insides of the squares, but I get gouges on the bottom because router dips when I run off the edges. I guess I need some sort of jig, but really don't know how to make it. If I used the router in the table, it would be routing blind. Don't know how to use this either. The fence on the table seems to be off an 1/8th of an inch. Tried to get the fence even and pushed it back to 3". One side is right at 3", but other side is 3" and an 1/8". Is it supposed to be like this? Any suggestions on how to cut out these squares? I would appreciate any help you could offer. Thanks, Pat
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Pat,
Here is a link to the router forum. Look under "How to route 10" squares" for some ideas. The members here are a BIG help in router usage. Please sign up and visit often.
http://routerforums.com /

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psmrmn wrote:

...
For this all you need is an additional support the same thickness as the stock and a fence (or two at right angles to make it even more precise)...then the base of the router can just slide right of the edge of the workpiece and remain flat and run against the fence(s) to produce a straight edge(s).
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Duane,
I don't think that addresses routing out the middle of a square which is basically the size of the router base. He's not concerned about the edges.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

Why not???...just start in the middle and work to the outside instead of inside out...
But, if he can't seem to control the router by keeping one side on the outer/non-routed edge, then make a larger sub-base...
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Gotcha.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

Actually, to be more precise, the way I'd approach it would be to do a single pass around the outside (against the fences as I described earlier) then start at one side and work across. This provides a clean edge first then keeps the most material for a bearing surface possible plus gives clearance at the ends so you don't get small "divots" along the edge coming against the fence over and over...
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Actually I'm rather fascinated to know where all this is heading. Maybe we'll get a pic of the finished project?
FoggyTown
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(snip) ---------------- How about this:
Use two fixed fences and two sliding fences as well as one filler piece.
(3/8" stuff is not that available here as we are all metric, but 9mm is just a little shy of that. If you can make the filler piece any thickness you want then you can have any depth you want. So I've used 9mm as an example only)
Use 9mm MDF and cut 2 strips wide enough to support your router and long enough to provide a 'slide' entry for the moving fences. Stick them down with double-sided tape excately on the edge lines of two opposing sides of the square. Cut two more pieces 7" wide (or just a little less) and long enough to span the whole 7", from either side, and still be clamped without obstructing your router, these will be the sliding fences. Cut one filler piece the same width as the sliders but about 1.5", or so, long (this is to stop any possibility of the slider sagging once a portion has been routed). Position the sliders such that you are bang up on one side and some distance off with the other that creates a 'window' that your router can easily span, clamp sliders down. Use a suitable bearing guided bit, chomp out the wood in the window until required depth is attained. Remove sliding fences. Drop filler into newly chomped hole, resposition sliding fences and repeat until done.
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I tried to follow the directions and now I have double-sided tape stuck to my eyebrows and MDF pieces stacked in a pile. I think this is one of those "you had to see it yourself" explanations. I'll re-read again after a couple of cups of coffee. The old brain isn't too smart this morning.
Bob
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SNIP
Use a plywood template - easily made with the router and tacked-on strips -for the outline. Cut the template with a collar/bit combo which yields larger than 7" by the amount of difference in the collar you will use for the clean rout. Climb direction holds the guide to the template.
Take the center out freehand by clamping/screwing two runners to your router base and dropping the bit to the proper depth.
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