New to me plane, Stanley 7G

Yes there's a NoG7 cast into the bed, but I can't find anything in Google about it. I'm slowly working my way through the 726 patents issued on 2-17-20 but thought someone here might have heard of this one. I'd guess it's one of the innovations that didn't quite make it. Images, large and small available. http://people.musc.edu/~gormanj/Stanley7 / Joe
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Joe Gorman wrote:

1331280, watch the wrap, http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.htm&r "0&f=G&lP&d=PALL&s1200217.PD.&p=5&OS=isd/02/17/1920&RS=ISD/19200217 or an easier to read version at http://www.pat2pdf.org/patents/pat1331280.pdf This lead me to look for Edmund Shade which shows on http://www.imaging.robarts.ca/~amulder/wood/stanley.html http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswingle/archive/get.phtml?message_idR49&submit_thread=1 search for schade on these pages to find the info about him. Oh, if you're searching uspto.gov by plane date Class 30 appears to be hand tools. That speeded up the search quite a bit. Joe
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It's a Stanley "Gage" (hence the 'G7') Jointer plane, based on a design developed by John Porcius Gage's company 'Gage Planes & Tools' before Stanley bought them out. It was later further developed into the Stanley No. 7 & 7C Jointer Planes, with an improved blade and cap iron mounting. The No. 7 had a smooth bottom, the 7C was corrugated.
From the amount of relief on both sides of the blade's cutting edge, it looks like someone was using it as a 'scrub' plane at some point in time.
Len
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Len wrote:

sides. Could they have been doing it for speed with the jointers and counting on their smoothers for the perfectly flat surface by just slightly rounding the corners on the smoother? Joe
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Sounds reasonable to me.
Len
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Not a Stanley innovation, but it is a desgn that didn't make it, because Stanley bought the company that made these planes and and after a time phased this design out. The G statnds for Gage, a would-be competitor to Stanley. For the short time that Stanley produced planes using the Gage design, they used numbers like your plane has, i.e., the regular bench plane size designation with a G prefix.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

reference quite a few references turned up. For those who've been here a while this one may bring back a memory or two. It turned up when I had narrowed the search to category 30 http://www.pat2pdf.org/patents/pat1331218.pdf Made me think of a well intentioned haircut that turned out not so well. Wonder if there's any relation between them:-) joe
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