New Table Saws

            NEW TABLE SAW
    Like so many other woodworkers I did a lot of research before I decided which saw to buy. In the Fall of 2005 I bought a Craftsman table saw for about $575. It has a 10" blade, the motor is 1 HP developing a maximum of 2 HP, weighs 350 pounds and including the wings has a 27" x 40" cast iron table. The model number is 152.22.
    I am delighted with its performance. The rip fence can be aligned with the miter gauge slot by sliding the fence adjacent to the slot and changing its alignment by loosening two hex nuts, making the adjustment and tightening the nuts. It also has an extra, aluminum fence which can easily added to the main one. The table can be aligned parallel to the saw blade by loosening the nut under each of the table top's four corners, moving the table top slightly one way or the other and tightening the nuts.
    The miter gauge also has an additional aluminum fence that can be added to it.
It came with an all around 40-tooth blade. I mailed in a coupon that came with the saw and I received an 18-tooth crosscut blade and a 60- tooth blade for plywood, gratis. It comes with a 4" dust port that I don't use. It has an open stand to which I taped on three of it's sides card board pieces which touch the floor and a fourth piece in front which is attached with Velcro.

the sawdust. I do this to avoid the noise, cost and lost space of a vacuum.
    I made three sleds: one for cross cutting, another for using dado blades and a third for bevel cuts. Each one has " MDF for a base and two runners. The cross cut sled is 16" deep and 40" wide with 1" of plywood for each fence and a clear acrylic blade guard. It is easy to use, I get consistent cross cuts and it is quite safe. I can also attach stops and a tenon fence. The other sleds are smaller, measure 12" by 20" and have hardwood fences.
    I have had three occasions to call customer support and each time a person answered my call quickly and if they couldn't help they transferred me to someone who could.
    On the negative side the screws supplied to attach items to the table's sides did not work. I found the saw blade guard such a nuisance that I removed it. The miter gauge is just so, so.
    All in all I couldn't be happier with my choice of table saws.
    Because it is my first one I bought a copy of "The Table Saw Book" and the accompanying DVD by Kelly Mehler. I studied them both very carefully and found them to be a tremendous help.
    G. H. - Beaufort, SC             7/1/07
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Let me know how that 18-tooth crosscut blade works! Tom
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I spoke from my memory when I said it was a cross cut blade. Now I think I was wrong. I examined it and compared it to the saw blade descriptions in Mehler's book. It is a flat top grind (FTG) with a 20 degree forward rake. I tried it on a piece of 3/4" Southern Pine, both crosscutting and riping. Both were clean cuts with the rip the nicer of the two. It is an Orion 35931 blade. I tried to find a description of it on line without any luck. Sorry for the misinformation.
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