new source of bandsaw injuries

Having finally received my new blades from Lenox I'm thinking I figured out where the bulk of bandsaw blade injuries happen. It isn't during operation, it's unpacking the new blade.
So I get my new blades, 3 tpi resawers and note the twisties holding the blade in a coil. So I undo one twistie, so far so good, then undo the other twistie. The blade didn't immediately uncoil so I tugged at one loop <Sproing!> "Ah my hand!" Now I have this lethal origami tangled around my arm like a bear trap. "Hmm maybe if I pull on this section to relieve pressure on the skin..." <SPROING!> "Ahh my arm!" But ever so gently I manage to slide the blade off my arm and before my eyes watch it transform into a nice perfect oval shape. So now, looking like I got mauled by my cat I can begin resawing planks.
We'll see how the blade does now that it's been blooded. It can't be any worse than that junk that was one it originally.
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Eigenvector wrote:

I believe there are a large number of carpenters and machinists who subscribe to the TIUITAARFYL system of bandsaw blade unpacking.
1. Take the package containing the bandsaw blade outside, into a large empty space.
2. Holding the blade tightly together with one hand (to prevent it from escaping) remove any packaging and restraining materials.
3. Throw It Up In The Air And Run For Your Life.
4. After several seconds, return to the large open space and pick up the neatly detangled and unpacked blade.
8-)
Spott
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Some years ago, I realized that unpacking blades was time to imitate that guy with the pointy nose, Michael Jackson. One glove, in my case on the left hand, can save a lot of bleeding. Or put one glove on the right hand, untwist the ties, and toss the blade gently onto the grass (if I throw with my left hand, I'll probably hit myself). Two gloves works fine, too, but I'm not always able to find a mate for my glove.
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I'll have to try that on the next few that I get from them. My cat was looking at me funny this morning. you know that look "Hmm, I wonder where the scratches came from. Hey he's been seeing another cat!"
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 22:04:52 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Be very very careful.... Once they taste human blood, well you get the idea...
-dickm
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"Eigenvector" wrote

I always wear gloves when handling bandsaw blades. Undo the ties, throw it on the grass outside, and stand back. May take a couple of tosses, but it will eventually open up by itself:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ToolGuide/ToolGuideArticle.aspx?id1409
Also shows another method to fold a blade using the corner of your workbench.
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Swingman wrote:

I take off the twistie-ties, put the blade on the floor, and let the shop cats take care of the rest...
Only kidding! <G>
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Swingman wrote:

Cool. Unfolding is NP, folding can be. This almost makes me want to rush out to the shop and refold a bunch of blades :)
--

dadiOH
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I learned by watching Michael at M&S saw mill to coil a blade by pointing your hands down and turning your hands inward while lightly stepping on the blade. The blade stays put with out the end flopping around.
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life-threatening wounds, I can imagine the carnage if I ever tried to fold it back up.
Watching the video it's actually quite intuitive as to how it's folded, something I would never had guessed without seeing it.
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I was a machinist for 25 years and that was the most ridicules thing I've seen on the net. Take a new blade out of its packaging and throw it on the concrete floor! Well it's not a new blade anymore. You simple put one of the coils under your shod toe and gently unwind it teeth pointing away from you. To recoil put one end of the loop under your shod toe grab the center of the long loop and twist down and you have a coil, no one gets injured. I have done this with 3/4" wide blades and it's very controllable. (with a little practice). But putting a blade under a table 2 inches and having it face you as you walk forward is just stupid!
Rich
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"Rich" wrote

Notice the "grass outside" and "another method" ... different strokes for different folks AND, you do have a 50/50 OPTION on whether to put the _sharp_ side up to fold it like they say in the video.
... it's not my usual method, but what the hell ... don't knock it 'til you tried it, no matter how "ridicules"!
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Typically you toss the blade on the ground on the shorter blades. I learned on the longer ones, mine is 150", tossing them on the ground does not usually work. Oddly the longer they are the less they want to uncoil rapidly. I uncoil and recoil mine with out gloves and by holding on, with the longer blades it's not such a big deal. A few years ago I was shocked to watch the guy at the saw mill coil and uncoil his blades with little effort or drama.
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I think they sent you a blade from Christine's car!
Jon

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Coiling:
Slip long piece of wood - broom stave, garden roller handle, flagpole etc. inside loop.
Hold loop between teeth. Start to turn anti clockwise away from pole, and then cartwheel left, bringing right foot over head, pivoting from floor on left hand and land on both feet, facing 180 away from starting position.
Continue rotating to left, ducking so that crossed blades pass over head.
Remove blade from between teeth - CAUTION, this bit can be hazardous - and walk towards pole, bringing both loops together with one hand while lifting the pole out of the way with the other.
No need to fasten, simply slip the doubly-coiled blade into an open drawer and slam it shut.
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wrote:

test post.
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 22:04:52 -0700, "Eigenvector"

I have a pair of leather gloves in the shop, mostly used when steaming wood but I use them every time when handling sometimes unpredictable bandsaw blades.
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Cheap protection! I picked a pair up for around $10 at the BORG, and then went to Menards and found another pair on sale for $5! They're well worth the expense and effort to use. If it looks like something might poke me or get dangerously pointy, I'm wearing them!
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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