New Shop Wiring?

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I agree and have done this with more than one shop.
One idea that I saw carried this out even further. He had a master swith that killed the intire shop. It had a lock on it. He kept having kids "wander" into his shop. They even crawled into a window.
He put bars on the window and shut off all power. He also installed a much better lock on the door. He said the kids soon lost interest if it was dark and locked.
If I tried to do that as a youngster, I would have got a severe beating. But that just isn't politically correct these days.
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No kidding. LOL. apparently not learning from your mistakes "IS" politically correct these days.
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On Sun, 03 Jun 2007 20:40:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:

It would be difficult to do in the first place and if you ever moved the machines, you're stuck. Further, there is the issue of getting the outlets clogged with sawdust. Probably your best idea is to either drop power from the ceiling or have a moveable drop-pole for power in your cluster of machines. That way, if you ever move anything, you can just move the power along with it.
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In my past life, I was an architect and worked with a lot of manufacturing plants and offices for a period of time.
Never put anything in a concrete floor unless absolutely unavoidable and then still had problems:
1. Water and mess getting into the outlets. Solution, put them up on pedestals above the floor line. Leads to problem 2.
2. No matter how carefully you located the outlet so it is covered by the machine and not a hazard, the machine will be moved later just enough (8" or so) to expose outlet and make it a tripping hazard. Same is true for outlets under the desk.
3. It is almost impossible to add circuits and or make conduit bigger, without jackhammering the concrete.
A trench in the floor is a PITA. A covered trench in the floor is a slightly smaller PITA.
Take a look in a McDonald's kitchen. It's all drop cords, with twist lock plugs.
If I rewired my shop, I'd do it like a theater lighting bridge.
I'd run a couple of conduits on the ceiling the length of the shop spaced about 8' to 10' apart, with several circuits in them. About every 6-8' put a 4-plex outlet for each circuit. Also have some screw eyes or something similar to support cords.
To connect a machine, run a heavy duty cord up from the machine to the nearest outlet, coil the extra cord, and hang it from the ceiling. Obviously, locate the cords to they don't get caught in operations. When its time to move, unplug and repeat the process.
Now you've got so much advice, I'm sure you are more confused than you were before you posted.
Good on you for building a new shop!
Old Guy

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Old guy wrote:
<snip why not a trench>
> If I rewired my shop, I'd do it like a theater lighting bridge. > > I'd run a couple of conduits on the ceiling the length of the shop spaced > about 8' to 10' apart, with several circuits in them. About every 6-8' put > a 4-plex outlet for each circuit. <snip>
By the time you get all that pipe and wire in place, you could have had busway installed for the same $ and half the time.
Made a living winning that comparison discussion for many years almost every time out of the box.
Matter of fact, don't remember losing one.
Lew
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"Old guy" wrote in message: . | Never put anything in a concrete floor unless absolutely unavoidable and | then still had problems:
<respectfully snipped>|
Amen to every point you made. Nuff said
woodstuff
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Only thing I have ever put in a concrete floor that I was glad I did was ... rebar :-)
mikey
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I'd be tempted to pick up a surplus computer room floor (tiles and supports), if the price were right.
They're designed to hold a great deal of weight, and give you enough room beneath to route both dust collection and power (fluidtite or eq. flex conduit).
And the suction cups are fun to play with :-)
scott
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wrote:

And they're hard as stone. *Damned* uncomfortable to stand on for any length of time. Fatigue mats are a must, just like they would be on concrete.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
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I've seen it available (not recently -- not in those circles these days) at prices of 'you haul it _all_ away'.` Isn't necessarily as good a deal as it sounds like -- the base of the risers is usually cemented to the floor; just removing them is a job-and-a-half. getting them up 'intact' is virtually *impossible*.

One *does* tend to get strange looks, at least from the uninitiated, when you ask what they did with the 'keys to the floor'. <grin>
And you _don't_ get into that space without a key. The only good news is that all the floors like that _are_ "keyed alike" -- getting a replacement key is no big deal except for the cost.
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On Jun 3, 11:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:

Listen to the architect. put your lighting circuit and power runs in pipe in the ceiling and along the wall (about 40" above the floor for the wall outlets). Put your lighting and the top two wall outlets on a 3-Way (4-way) switched circuit (so you can control the lighting and transformers (battery chargers come to mind) from any entrance (I have a switch on either side of the overhead door (for instance - talk about lazy) as well as adjacent the "man" doors.
Also have a 220VAC Kill switch setup to keep the compressor from disturbing the wife "People are sleeping!" she screams in the wee hours.
I like the idea of running conduit under the slab, but have to admit folks here dissuaded me.
The folks who suggest running cable and 10Base-T into the shop are my kind of people. Also like the Piss Tube suggestion - especially now that I'm at that age! I piped in the stereo the other day "Ahhh, Bach!." and intend to run coax and ethernet as well. Best time to do it is when you first build out.
MOISTURE PROOF THE SLAB REGARDLESS!
Add an extra run of block height is nice, but raising the roof or lowering an existing slab is tough work after the fact!
I like my windows high up for better ventilation - but no scientific evidence on that. Privacy, yes. Neighbors' peace, maybe improved.
Not sure about running dust collection under a slab, however. Temperature changes are likely to create condensation, no? Would this not impede the desired flow? Result in blockage issues? I would think the air laden with sawdust would be at a higher temp than the slab (any buried pipes within) . . . Again, no scientific evidence nor actual experience save with cold moist slab here!
Oh, yes, I suggest using plug-in fluorescent work lights. At about $9 for fixture and two bulbs (I buy 'em by the case), they are cheaper to replace than a ballast. Instead of hard wired fixtures or Keyless, I simply put in a duplex outlet with one side switched and another always on. Then, each light fixture can serve as a ceiling drop (right under the light!) and replacing a bad fixture is simply a matter of unhooking the chains and pulling the plug.
"Twenty-four by Twenty-four" - "Hmmm, sure your name isn't "Norm?"
Good luck
How practical is

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