New Shop Spec Suggestions

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Cuz Douglas Adams said _that_ *was* the answer. Albeit to a somewhat different question. <grin>
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Insulate the walls, screw plywood( if you can afford it !) and use conduit for all your electrical runs. I laid my 4 by 8's horizontal, used a 1 by 6 to hide the seam,mounted conduit on the 1 by 6s. Makes for a clean look, clamps grip the 1 by 6s, upgrading( you ALWAYS needa nother circuit !) is real easy. Put sub panel in, I used a 'fastpak' and put lights on separate breakers from machines. Install good doors to help keep the dust in the room and out of the rest of the house. hth jay
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I used 7/16"ish OSB for my first layer. Home Depot had it for $7ish a sheet and when you get done calculating ($150ish for a 20' X 20' space) it's nothing to the budget. I drywalled over it onna 'count of I didn't want to look at skanky OSB for the rest of my life.
UA100
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outlets at 42" - 50" every 5 - 6', max of 2 or 3 outlets to a circuit. Several ceiling mounted outlets where ever you might put your bench or assembly table. I would wait on the 220 outlets and add them on the surface once you figure out where they will go. Could go as far as to have the electrician run a 3/4" conduit and boxes every 12' around the room after the sheetrock was done. Chances are you will have 3 or less 220 machines and the 3/4 will handle that many circuits.
Sub panel is a good idea but i would let my lights and maybe one outlet come from the main panel. that way, if you want, you can shutoff the main breaker (lock it if desired) and know that your tools won't get run accidentally. You would then still have lights to use hand tools and get picture hanging hardware or whatever and any battery chargers or clocks could plug into the one outlet.
Plan for ventilation now with either a kitchen thru the wall fan or if you plan to do any finishing then perhaps an explosion proof exhaust fan. I would not finish in a basement shop but that is a personal preference.
Water, absolutely and a half bath if you can afford it. It gets tiring (and the neighbors complain) running outside and "using the tree" all the time.
Lighting, to your comfort level. there are too many discussions on this one already. I use primarily fluorescent but am adding incandescent "detail lighting".
Sound proofing the ceiling at the very least. I believe the current method is sheetrock, isolation channel and than sheetrock again. several discussion on this in the past. Google search the group. Heavy door(s)...
if your house will have a whole house vacuum, run a connection, or 2, to the shop. these work better on drill presses, sanders and band saws than traditional DC do. IN MY OPINION. I use one, I am happy with it, I empty it so I use it for the shop also. If you don't have one planned, now is the time to do it, you wife will like it, the dust goes out of the area/house and no I don't sell them.
the thought about plywood under the sheetrock is a good one, I would do that if I did my shop over but have not missed having it since I found french cleats. after all, this is a shop and not a museum. (SWMBO made me say that)
BRuce
Tiggy wrote:

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BRuce


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On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 09:25:23 -0500, BRuce <BRuce> suggested:

As Doug Stowe once suggested, you don't need a toilet if you use a pee bucket. Plus you get rid of some sawdust and good compost out of it. See:
http://groups.google.com/groups?q=sawdust+compost+pee+group:rec.woodworking&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=dstowe-1701991610540001%40csesp1-13.cswnet.com&rnum=1
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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LOL*2. Ok, where is that 5 gallon bucket... well better look for a 10 gallon bucket, the wife's craft room is over the shop.
BRuce
Luigi Zanasi wrote:

http://groups.google.com/groups?q=sawdust+compost+pee+group:rec.woodworking&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=dstowe-1701991610540001%40csesp1-13.cswnet.com&rnum=1
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BRuce


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BRuce <BRuce> wrote:

Or going upstairs to use the toilette like a proper gentleman... (Yes, I spelled it that way on purpose, because I was thinking in French at the time...)
People in a basement have fewer excuses about going outside to pee on a tree.
Reminds me of a funny, disgusting dog story though. (Consider that a warning to the easily-offended...)
At some point recently, the urge to purge grew great, and I let it go too long. I fished a Dr. Pepper can out of the trash because I couldn't make it all the way across the yard and then into and to the back of the house in time.
It was raining, so after I drained the main vein, I tossed the can out to drain in the rain.
So, basically, I didn't go pick the can up, and I forgot about it. (I'm a slob, get over it.) Couple three days later, I'm in the shop, and SWMBO is standing there yammering about something. I'm going "un huh, uh huh" and meanwhile my newest dog catches my eye. He's out in the yard with this stupid can, rolling on it, licking at it, chewing on it, then he goes down on one shoulder and rubs the thing on himself all the way around, like he's taking a bath in some delicate eau de toilette...
SWMBO was laughing because Bubby really *loves* Dr. Pepper, and I was laughing because I knew what kind of residue was really in that can.
I think maybe "master pee" is even more piquante to the pooch than cat shit.
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Just saw a mag on the newsstand that was labeled something like "Best Shops" (or something like that) and featured a number of shops of all sizes and what makes them special. Sorry I don't recall the name but since I already have a shop, I didn't spend much time looking at it. But it is on the stands right now.
Bob S.

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Thanks, I think you might be referring to the Wood magazine series. I have most of those, and they were instrumental in our house decision (although my wife might not realize that :-). You can see their various configurations on their website:
http://www.woodmagazine.com/default.sph/wcontent_user.class ? FNCtegory__Asection_html___7___40
Fine Woodworking also has some shop setup specifics in their annual issue, on the stands now:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/nmw027_xtras.asp
Thanks for all the comments guys - plenty of stuff that never occurred to me. Provided we succeed in selling our existing house (and maybe a suitcase stuffed with cash falls from the sky,) I'll upload some photos when I finally make the new shop happen!
- Al
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The Tools and Shops was the one I was looking at.....gotta get a new memory, this one has a low battery alarm blinking...
Bob S.

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I built my shop I put a 1x4 dadoed rail around the walls at 51" and 34" from the floor. This allows my to always find a solid material to screw or nail to. This way I can put thing where I want rather than over a stud.
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one thing i havn't seen mention is ground level walk out from the basement. doors as wide as anything you plan to build... ;)
The plywood/osb on the walls suggestion is good... the sheetrock over that is likely to be required for fire code.
lots of outlets. on several circuits. I'd put each circuit on a properly rated switch. Breakers are not meant to be switched alot... switches (go figure) are. since these will likely be inductive loads, get the anti arc switches.
make sure you have phone/internet/intercom down there. (and a place for a laptop/computer for reading rec.woodworking ;)
if you can wing it, a seperate positive air pressure finishing area.
hmmm... that the short list...
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flip
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Philip Lewis wrote:

Interesting...I'd never heard that. Are you required to put sheetrock over wood paneling, too? Joking, of course, but why would sheetrock be required for fire code?
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ok... you got me... i can't find a reference... bad flip. but i *know* i've read it before... perhaps it applies to occupied/unoccupied spaces.
Does paneling usually go up on bare studs? i always thought it went over plaster. (all installations i've seen have been over plaster/sheetrock)
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it is that way here in NC, at least in occupied areas and attached garages, I didn't ask about my detached garage. I also didn't ask about paneling. Most all the paneling I have seen has been in mobile homes and they have their own code.
BRuce
Chris Merrill wrote:

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BRuce


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I've noticed all of the suggestions here apply to attached or basement shops.
For those who have the opportunity and the means, I highly recommend a detatched shop.
The people in your life who say they don't mind the noise do. The same ones have to clean up the sawdust that isn't really a significant amount. It is. And lastly, the smell of finishing compound that they say isn't that bad, really is.
Sure, most of us have to make do with whatever work spaces are available. But given the chance, give the folks in your family a break and don't make them share the less pleasant parts of your avocation.
Bill
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wrote:

If you are also puting in a floor you may want to put some conduit in to the location of the tablesaw. keeps that big 220 line out of the way. skeez
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When I built the space for my 20' x 30' shop, I wanted plenty of light and plenty of outlets.
I had them wire the walls with wall outlets roughly 3 1/2' high from the floor and every 4'-5' around the room. I also had them put in 9 outlets in the floor on two different circuits. Then I added a 220v circuit about where I thought the table saw would go. I tried to determine where I thought I'd have a dust collector system and added a 220v circuit there, too.
For lighting, I had them install a total of 30 flourescent fixtures in 6 separate banks. Even with all that light there are still areas next to the walls where the light is not good. At my lathe, I have to have a small lamp for additional lighting, and at my bandsaw the same thing.
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How about 1/2" copper pipe in the walls and in the ceilings, with outlets for compressed air?
Don't forget to slope it the right way (back towards the compressor). Also, I'm not sure whether it is better to install them with 1/4" or 1/2" threaded outlets. I think I'll do both on at least a few of them, so I can connect both 1/4" small air tools and blow gun, and larger air tools.
How about building in dust collection pipes? Problem is that the typical 4" dust collection pipe won't fit into normal stud walls.
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That sounds like a good size, it's it clear space dedicated to the shop. I've got just about exactly that size and shape of floor space, but it's shared with a flight of stairs, laundry sink, furnace, and water heater. Not to mention three very inconveniently placed columns. Having that amount of space clean of obstructions would be wonderful!
I envy you having 8-1/2' headroom in the basement. I've got barely 7 feet to the bottom of the floor joists, which means about 7' 6" between the joists. Oh, how much just another 6 inches would be. Another 12 would be heaven.

You absolutely want the 200 amp service. I went through this with my contractor. I wanted 200 amp, he pushed back and said nobody would ever need more than 150. I insisted, and I'm glad I did. It's not so much the actual current draw, but the number of slots for breakers that made a big difference. Yes, you could make more circuits with half-size breakers, but then the wiring becomes a real mess. It's much neater with a larger box and stuff spread out more.

I don't think I would want to build the dust collection ducts into the walls. What if you get a clog and need to disassemble a run to clean it out?
Have you thought of a half bathroom in the basement? It's a real bummer being in the middle of something and having to troop upstairs tracking sawdust through the house just to take a leak.
Do you have a large door going to the outside? Makes it a whole lot easier to get machines and materials in and finished projects out. Don't settle for a standard 30" door. Make sure it's 36" wide (like all exterior doors should be, but often people skimp on basements).
When they wire the basement, make sure the lights are on a dedicated circuit. Don't share lighting with power outlets.
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