New shop snake part 2

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Greg G. wrote:

Or, they may be from putting too much belief in what they read on Google! :)
One of the most aggressive snakes in LA when I was growing up were the copperheads, which I routinely ran across when mowing the 2 acre house site ... often had to put back away from the damn things as they _advanced_.
Being reptile, maybe it's the difference in regional temperatures?
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Swingman said:

There's a lot of that going on. :)

Probably has to do with temperature, last meal, etc. All snakes get rather sluggish while digesting their last conquest or when cold. But other than eastern diamondbacks and cornered large black racers, they are the most aggressive snakes I've seen on land in the SE if disturbed, and as a kid I played with them all. A large, active copperhead fears nothing. Cottonmouths are no picnic either.
LA would be Lower Alabama, or the one in SoCal?
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote:

hehe ... bayou country, Bubba! As in not that far from NOLA. :)
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Swingman said:

Yeah, just as I hit the send button I remembered your last name and went D'oh! Seriously...
Greg G.
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Greg G. said:

Come to think about it, it may not have been quite that large, more like 3 1/2', but when you're a kid, something that large transfixed in a striking pose looks mighty big - and grows larger every second. ;-)
Greg G.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Supposedly most snakebite deaths are from copperheads but also supposedly that's because they are commonplace. Looking at all the copperhead photos on flickr it's clear that they are pretty even tempered as venomous snakes go--there are only a few shots out of hundreds where they have their mouths open.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I should add to that though, that any snake turns paranoid when it's molting--there's a period before their new skin hardens when they are pretty much blind and they'll strike at anything that they think _might_ be a threat, so even one that knows you and is so mellow that you feel comfortable picking it up and carrying it out of the shop may suddenly turn on you if you catch it at the wrong time.
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 13:01:52 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

story!!!!!!
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On Oct 6, 8:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Do not mess with them. Even when they're dead, respect that fang. Tom
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tom wrote:

My neighbor told me a story (which I'm not sure is true; the guy is pretty good at embellishing) about being with a friend when they killed a rattler. My neighbor was getting ready to cut the rattle off as a souvenir, but his friend stopped him with a "WHOA!" He stepped on the snake's neck and cut the head off first, then said "Ok, now you can get the rattle". As soon as my neighbor started cutting the rattle off, the snake's body reflexed and the bloody stub where the head had been hit him right in the calf.
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can. A bit of excitement for a little while. Then dug a hole and buried the remains.
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 23:48:16 -0400, clare wrote:

is just as capable of causing death or loss of lots of flesh due to its venom rotting the bite area. Nice colouring though.
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correctly was just over 5 feet long and almost 3 inches in diameter. He was just inside the shop door when we came back from lunch. The guys were pretty excited, and searched the whole shop after killing it to be sure it didn't have a friend along!!!
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On 10/07/2009 05:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I lived upcountry in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo) in the late 80s. Had a python eat one of the neighbor's goats. They tracked it down while it was still digesting it.
There was also the odd poisonous snake, one time some friends found a spitting cobra in the outhouse. Our dog killed a little snake in the house one time...didn't think it was poisonous though.
Best part about living there was our pet african grey parrot. They're awesome. Stupid expensive in North America though.
Chris
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:00:43 -0600, Chris Friesen

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:00:43 -0600, Chris Friesen

(formerly Upper Volta)
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 23:48:16 -0400, clare wrote:

Not sire what you're calling a puff adder. In Kentucky where I grew up, a hognose snake was called a puff adder and they're about as harmless as a snake can get. A lot of country folks were convinced they were poisonous. They puff up and strike - with their mouth closed! If that doesn't work, they roll over and play dead. But if you flip them over, they flip right back - a dead snake is supposed to be on its back :-).
I worked a university exhibit of native snakes at the state fair when a teenager. When people told me that the hognoses should have been in with the poisonous snakes, I'd pick one up, force its mouth open, and stick in a finger. I never got bit. The only problem was that after a couple of days of being handled, they got so tame they wouldn't roll over anymore.
The only poisonous snakes in the US are rattlesnakes, copperheads, coral snakes, and water moccasins. There is a "false" water moccasin that has no poison, but his mouth is so foul that getting bit is almost like getting stuck with a pungee stick.
AFAIK, only the hognose puffs up like a cobra. If you know of another, let me know. In the meantime, look at:
http://www.snakesandfrogs.com/scra/snakes/ehognos.htm
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On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 15:39:40 -0500, Larry Blanchard

Try Bitis Arietans - average size is about 40 inches, and thick as a man's wrist. Can grow to roughly 70 inches in length. They are responsible for more deaths in Africa than any other snake. They are "Cytotoxic" - toxic to cells - and can cause severe necrosis and low blood pressure. Only fatal in about 10% of untreated cases, their death toll is still very high.
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On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 19:53:16 -0400, clare wrote:

Sorry - I was talking about the US, or at most North America. Are you from Africa?
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 10:17:25 -0500, Larry Blanchard

2 years in Livingstone Zambia, and a shorter time in Burkina Faso.
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