New shop, electrical question

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Didn't have to use it - if you've ever connected the ribbon (it's really a thin aluminum wire) you'd see how crappy it is. I'd feel safer with bx to box connections.
shelly
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Doug
Typo on the "Not be exposed". Should read "wiring will not be exposed".
I will have to reread the paragraph you mention. On a big electrical job I kept up with 2 years ago this was an inspection item. No conduits, flexible or not was acceptable as a ground conductor. Yes the conduit was grounded and the boxes also but with a specified ground conductor.
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On 9/8/2011 1:50 AM, Bob AZ wrote:

That *is* what it reads; that's why the statement makes no sense. Did you mean it should read "wiring will be exposed"?

Perhaps there's a local ordinance prohibiting it, or perhaps the inspector doesn't understand the Code, or perhaps that was specified by contract. But it's not prohibited by the NEC. The NEC doesn't permit a total of more than 6 feet of flex in a ground-fault path, but there is no such limitation on rigid or intermediate, or on EMT.
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Armor is also used as the ground.... in NYC, where the code is unbelievably strict, armored cable is ALL they let you use - no romex at all. Using 2-12 armor is standard for a 20 amp breaker. Just make sure that you use metal boxes (not the plastic crap) and make sure the connections to the boxes are tight.
shelly
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http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/home-wiring-usa/accessory-structures-to-dwellings/wiring-a-detached-garage-2002.php
Although this is 2002 NEC it is pretty handy advice that covers a lot of issues, and the links are useful also.
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The conduit and metal boxes constitute the Mechanical Grounding. The bare copper conductor (or green wire) constitutes the Electrical Ground. So, all your conduit should be mechanically "bonded" one to the other and all your devices should be connected to the Electrical Ground at the source.
Note: You can never have enough electrical outlets.
For lighting, I use (switched - 4-wa, in my case) grounded outlets in/ on the ceiling to accept the plugs of those cheap fluorescent "shoplights" I get at HD or Lowes ($8-10) as it makes changing our ballasts/fixtures a snap (well, a de-hook/re-hook)
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On 9/9/2011 11:58 AM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

That is incorrect.
The term "mechanical grounding" doesn't make any sense, and is not a concept recognized by the NEC.
Moreover, the NEC makes no distinction between rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, electrical metallic tubing (aka EMT or thinwall), copper wire, or aluminum wire, in terms of their suitability as equipment grounding conductors: all are equally acceptable.
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I bet the NEC makes no distinction with glass and plastic for grounding either. This doesn't make it OK as there are other rules that you don't seem to be able to see with your HUHAS.
--------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message That is incorrect.
The term "mechanical grounding" doesn't make any sense, and is not a concept recognized by the NEC.
Moreover, the NEC makes no distinction between rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, electrical metallic tubing (aka EMT or thinwall), copper wire, or aluminum wire, in terms of their suitability as equipment grounding conductors: all are equally acceptable.
------------------- On 9/9/2011 11:58 AM, Hoosierpopi wrote: The conduit and metal boxes constitute the Mechanical Grounding. The bare copper conductor (or green wire) constitutes the Electrical Ground.
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When Military stations went under OSHA, an OSHA man came to inspect the largest man made structure in the world - a massive Radar building.
Many floors of special hardening e.g. the toilets were mounted on springs and flex tubing... It could take a 75Megaton blast on the side.
This is something of a building. Anyway - he was looking around and couldn't find anything - Mil spec everywhere. He walked by my Dads desk and spotted a "Polly Pot" - A green plastic coffee pot. He stopped and spied a 2 wire cord on the pot. Ah Ha ! - Violation at last. Dad informed him that the plastic was non-conductive. He stood firm and so Dad went into the shop, got a 3 prong plug and wound a green wire along the two wire - and with a lug and sheet metal screw (SS) attached it to the pot. Dad installed it - the man was pleased he found and had the error corrected. - Dad kept it that way until he signed the site over to NASA. Mechanical connection...
Martin
On 9/9/2011 10:11 PM, Josepi wrote:

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Didn't realize I would start such a thread. I hired an electrician. He tied the 110 armor cable ground to the same ground used for the 220 circuit (duh). He put in a few new 4 gang boxes and two switched outlets. I could have done the switched outlets but I would have run wire back and forth a few times and he did it in a single 3 conductor run, as it should be done. $150 well spent.
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