New shop, electrical question

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I'll post pics and specs on my new shop once I have it all setup, I am moving into a 1,500 sq ft barn and getting a few new tools.
My landlord (the farmer) added some additional electrical for me. Hehad an electrician put in a 220 circuit and run some metal conduit out to where I wanted the 220 plug and put it in a metal jbox. He also ran two wires for an aditional 110 circuit to the same jbox all inside metal conduit. I will pull the 110 out and route it to where I want the extra juice.
I do lots of home electrical and can follow the diagrams well and know some of the codes, etc. I have always used romex or armorcable. I want to come out of this steel jbox with some armor cable to a 4 gang outlet, then out to a 1/2 switched outlet and then another switched outlet. I am familar with how all that is done but have the following question (finally).
Do I attach the ground wire in the armor cable to the jbox? Once I go out of one of the switches I will use romex overhead and I want to be sure everything is grounded correctly. I guess the metal conduit and boxes are ground enough to just run the two wire 110 but when I come out to armor cable and romex I want to be sure I am grounded no?
BW Hoping I don't burn the place down or lectracute mysef. The farmer wouldn't be happy.
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wrote:

As far as I know you need the safety ground wire to be continuous throughout your wiring, from the fuse box to each outlet. The ground wire in each outlet box connects both to the outlet and to the box itself.
I wouldn't count on the armor to be a ground connector, it's not exactly a copper conductor. Safety first!
Anyway, if you don't get it inspected by an electrician you might get in legal trouble from the landlord if there's a problem, even in the future after you leave!
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 20:27:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

Easy way around the latter. Cut the wire off when you leave.
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On 9/7/2011 8:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

It doesn't have to be copper.
The NEC explicitly permits the use of (among other things) the armor of type AC armored cable to be used as the equipment grounding conductor. Other acceptable grounding conductors include aluminum wire, EMT, rigid metal conduit, flexible metal conduit, and flexible metallic tubing. [2008 NEC, Article 250.118]
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 21:25:51 -0400, Doug Miller

Ya, the code is one thing... safety is another. I've seen armored cable where the armor was no longer connected to the box, just hanging in the air, or barely attached by rusty screws. In that case a short to ground could blow out the rusty connection and leave the ground hot.
In some types of installations, such as computer systems or recording studios, dedicated ground wires are ran to eliminate electrical noise. The equipment chassis ground is connected to the safety ground wire but not the armor. Sometimes these outlets are colored orange.
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On Thu, 08 Sep 2011 21:19:04 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

Poor workmanship is poor workmanship - whether metalic sheathed cable or Romex. ANd to meet code, the RIGHT box connectors are required. In Canad, the galvanized BX (obsolete now) does NOT meet code. And the AntiShort is absolutely necessary.

Virtually ALL isolated ground receptacles are orange - and they all have a green triangle on them. The "U" ground is not connected to the mounting bracket (hense the "isolated ground" - and the bare safety ground connects to the box - which also grounds the cover plate if it is metal - while the ground terminal (green wire by code - sometimes red wire of NMD3 cable, taped green at both ends) runs DIRECTLY back to the ground buss on the panel. This pretty well limits a "isolated ground" circuit to ONE duplex receptacle - or possibly 2 isolated ground reeptacles in one box.
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On 9/8/2011 9:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

Don't blame the armored cable for that. Blame an incompetent installer.
> In that case a short to ground could blow out > the rusty connection and leave the ground hot.
Probably not before tripping the breaker...
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"Look at me" syndrome or just losing it? Read what he stated again and stop trying to disagree regardless of what people post.
Is this another case where the hot wire can feed current into a box and it doesn't return to the source "vapour currents" but, it can still trip the breaker?
Perhaps this is another one of your imaginary current circuits, like the bathroom fan circuit, where the current fills up the device before it continues to the rest of the circuit?
--------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message

Don't blame the armored cable for that. Blame an incompetent installer.

Probably not before tripping the breaker...
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after all, consider the mayhem that can be caused by accidentally pinching, squeezing, cutting or puncturing romex - bx is called armored for a reason.
shelly
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On Thu, 08 Sep 2011 22:35:34 -0400, Doug Miller

My point was that people don't care if they damage the armor because they think it serves no electrical purpose. They wouldn't react the same to seeing the wires hanging out! And it's easier to disconnect the armor than the ground wire.

Yup, and they would then flip the breaker back on, and with the armor blown out, would energize the chassis with 120v.
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On 9/11/2011 8:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

And *my* point is that people who know what they're doing understand what the armor is for; it's only people who are not familiar with the Code who think the armor serves no electrical purpose...

Don't blame the armor for that either. Blame an ass who flips a tripped breaker back on without finding out why it tripped first.
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message wrote:

And *my* point is that people who know what they're doing understand what the armor is for; it's only people who are not familiar with the Code who think the armor serves no electrical purpose...

Don't blame the armor for that either. Blame an ass who flips a tripped breaker back on without finding out why it tripped first.
================Those points are moot.
99.6% of the users of armoured cable are non-electrically trained people, and not "know what they are doing" though. Even electricians, as knowledgeable as they think they are, put breakers back on to find out why they tripped. That is a basic troubleshooting technique to start with, by almost all people. When it doesn't trip again we shrug and walk away, wondering.
--
Eric


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On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 22:49:54 -0400, Doug Miller

You're assuming most people have the knowledge of electricians... the opposite is true. I once watched a guy wiring his barn with some industrial wire he bought. I told him he couldn't use the 'blue' wires because they were not in code, and he told me "It's my barn I'll wire it any way I want!" Pity the electrician who goes there later to fix it! I should have reported the idiot.

99% of the population!
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On 9/12/2011 10:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

To the contrary, I assume that most people do *not* have that knowledge, specifically including *you*.

You were wrong.
The Code specifies that neutral must be white or gray; ground must be bare, green or green with a yellow stripe; and that those colors can be used for no other purposes. It makes no mention whatsoever of blue, black, red, orange, or any other colors, with respect to residential wiring. Unless he was using blue wire for ground or neutral, it's perfectly fine.

Why? Any electrician should be able to figure out that a blue wire is hot.

He was right, you were not. Who's the idiot?
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On Tue, 13 Sep 2011 10:21:53 -0400, Doug Miller

I should have told you I only used the blue color as an example, he was using a multi colored wire bundle in a totally haphazard fashion, connecting blues to greens to oranges... whatever was convenient, and changing color mid-run is a code violation as far as I know. I don't think he had any white wires in what I saw.

I didn't say he used it for hot, you jumped to an incorrect conclusion.

Unless it's ground.

I'd say you are... :)
Are you an electrician by the way?
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On 9/13/2011 8:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote: [...]

That *is* a violation.

"as far as [you] know" the Code doesn't seem to be very far. :-)

He didn't need any. Gray is acceptable for neutral.

You claimed that using a blue wire was a violation. It's not.

And if it's installed as such, that's a violation. But there's nothing at all wrong with using blue wires, your delusions to the contrary notwithstanding.

Why? Because I know the Code and you don't?

No. Never claimed to be, either. I don't need to ask you that question; I already know the answer.
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First, no matter what color is used, a professional or technical person should always test. There are always someone that wires something in with a wire they have.
And if you want to bet your life on another persons good or bad day then simply take care, you live on the edge.
Martin
On 9/14/2011 7:47 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

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On Wed, 14 Sep 2011 08:47:15 -0400, Doug Miller

because you have no sense of humor... and you like side-stepping my questions.

Of course I'm not an electrician, I'm a technician, I have an IBEW card for my work in telecommunications.
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On 9/14/2011 8:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com wrote:

Surely the IBEW has some sort of classes you can take to learn something, anything, about the NEC so that you don't sound quite so silly when you discuss it...
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2011 22:51:40 -0400, Doug Miller

I have no reason to learn any more about the code then I know now. I don't do much elec. wiring other than in my own house, and I know enough for that. Anyway, I always take the safer route, and would look up anything I would need to know. Most of what I do know about code is what I got from the company electricians, who inspected any work I needed to do to keep the communications equipment running.
For now, lets just kill this useless thread and try to get along! This is after all a wood shop, not a utility room!
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