New Shop: any suggestions?

I am about to build a woodworking shop. Currently, I'm thinking 24' x 40' on concrete slab - no choice about the slab.
I am going to buy a Delta Unisaw, but have a few questions:
1) Other than the table to the right (52" cut) and the rear outfeed table, do you recommend any additional surface? Maybe a table to the left? Should the rear outfeed table be the full width of the saw AND other tables, or just to the rear of the blade?
2) How much clearance would you like to have on all sides of the saw beyond the tables?
3) Is it worth it to have dust collection run under the slab? What material and what size?
4) Should I consider an alternative to running electrical under the slab to feed the saw? If so, what is the alternative? Can the outlets be flush to the slab surface?
I'm thinking wall-mounted metal pipe for the rest of the dust collection - comments?
What about the Interior walls? Norm says to use wood so you can mount anything anywhere - makes sense. What about OSB? It's cheap (relatively), takes screws well and can be painted white. Comments?
Any other comments or suggestions will be appreciated. What do you like best and least about your shop?
Thanks for your input,
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used OSB for the wals. I have not found any problems as of yet. 2 years.
I cut a notch at 3-3/4" notch centered at 33 and 53 inches to allow a 1x4 belt to run the walls at those heights. If I need a stud I am not limited to 16" centers. I can put screws almost anywhere at the two heights.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"John T. Howard" wrote ...

I can't see why that would be necessary given a rip capacity larger that the full width of a sheet of plywood. I've certainly never required one and I think it would be in the way. I've never considered it before so it is an interesting question.

I assume you mean clearance between the table edge and other machines etc... I butt my saw almost against the wall on the right hand side (extension table for the rip fence). With 50+ inches of rip capacity, you don't really need clearance on that side. On all others - as much as I can get. Right now I have 7 or eight feet on the left hand side, which is fine. I have the same in front of the saw and more if I open the overhead door. In winter that can get a bit tight at times but overall it is acceptable. On the ooufeed end I have a 4+ foot extension and 4 feet of clearance after it. That isn't enought room. 3 more feet, at least, would be nice.

I would be afraid of plugging it up should bits get caught up in it. I prefer to have complete access to mine, even though I have never had to unplug it. Still, last week I was cleaning up the edge of a large piece of plywood using the stock throatplate and a surprisingly wide, and long, sliver was almost completely sucked down. I was able to extract it through the throat plate after the saw stopped but it could jsut as easily have broken off and become jammed in the duct I suppose.

I have a heavy gauge cable with a twist plug on mine. It plugs into an outlet on the wall. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Sure.
I used T1-11 (or is it T-111 - I can never get that right) exterior panelling. It looks great - especially with a nice color of deck stain on it. I haven't stained mine but I've seen it done. Actually, left alone, after a few years mine has a nice kind of patina on it. T1-11 is much more expensive than OSB unfortunately, but it is tongue and grooved so it goes up nicely and you don't see the seams.
I like my huge windows the best. I have my bench right under one of them and I can work without lights most of the time. This shop is 20 x 20 so it is too small. My last shop was 22 x 54 and it was way too friggin big. I spent most of my time chasing tools and sweeping so I don't hold with the bigger is better theory. However, I think (for me anyway) that 20 x 20 is too small and that's what I like the least.
--
Cheers,
Howard
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
Howard,
Wouldn't that capacity be for cross cuts on plywood? Personally my 50" capacity never gets used and that table is almost too big for my shop as well. But I love that fence, its dead on accurate, well last time I checked anyway.
Sincerely, Rich

etc...
really
the
of
through
more
it
is
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John T. Howard wrote:

Full width and full depth. Take your measurements from a queen size mattress. Use the additional space below to store cut-off sleds. Don't Ask Me How I Know This.

I've got 8'ish in the front, 8'ish in the back and 3'ish to the left which is fine as long as I never have to rip anything longer than 8'ish. Your Mileage May Vary.
The table on the right is shoved up tight to the wall and so far I've found no need to play Ring Around the Rosy. Of course we've had no plagues here of late...

I have a layer of OSB on the 2X studs and a layer of drywall over that. Paints well and takes a screw(s) well. It doesn't mean you can hang a car off the wall but with a proper amount of screws I've never had anything fall off nor do I ever need to by a stud finder.

Lights, lights, lights and when you think you've just about got enough lights, add more lights.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snipped>> Any other comments or suggestions will be appreciated. What do you

Consider having a trough cast into the slab for dust collection... with a ledge so 3/4" exterior or marine grade plywood strips can be placed into them as covers as well as keeping things from falling in. They should be large enough to accept a 6" duct... any clogs and the duct is accessible . I shaped mine like a "T" with a 45 degree offset at the junction (as opposed to 90 degrees like a regular "T".) Combined with a cyclone separator and blast gates at floor level under the saw, the system works quite well. As to the outfeed table, I use a full size sheet of 3/4" plywood on a shopmade frame topped with white surfaced MDF. I scribble on it, use it as an assembly area, and have a bunch of lumber stowed beneath it (can also be used for sleds ala Keith's comments. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 01:54:05 GMT, John T. Howard

It'll never hurt if you've got the space.

Yes.
I like at least 9 feet from the respective blade teeth at the front and back. 6 feet on the left side of the blade, and the width of the table board to the right, has been fine for me, as anything longer than that is a pain for me to crosscut. I'm measuring from the blade, not the table edges.

All my DC and electrics come from above, others may disagree.

Hanging pigtails from above.

Sure!
Both would be fine. Slatwall is good to have in some areas.

Get as much natural light in as you can.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John, Grats on the dream shop! I have a dream shop but its only 20x20, hehe.
Some opinions on your questions.

Table to left for large cross cuts is very handy but if you have space you might be able to build a large work table that the saw and table fits into so you have continuous table on the left and back of saw. Handy for laying wood pieces etc that you are cutting or working on.

My saw/table is an island unto itself. This way I can walk around it and my tools are in a circle around the saw up against the walls. You want clearance to feed lumber and ply into it. I have my feed side of my saw facing garage door so the occasional long piece I just open the door.

Definitely! I see alot of contractors pour the floor then rent a concrete saw to cut a channel then patch it. Dont know if this is the best way but I would run your dust collection and power for TS under the floor. I plan on doing this some day in my garage so I dont have to step over the pipe and cable. Right now I do like Norm does. If you use like 4 or 6" pvc pipe with for all under floor applications I dont think you will ever have a problem as it is very smooth. I've never had a clog on my black plastic dust collection sys. Maybe 6" is better to keep any clogs from happening under the floor. Even if you did have one I'm sure you could unclog it or call a plumber and he'll do it for about $100 an hour, lol.
> I'm thinking wall-mounted metal pipe for the rest of the dust

Supposed to be the best for grounding and 6" is recomended by alot of people. I have 4" white pvc on the ground with the black plastic flex tubes up the walls. I have my DC outside of garage in a little lean too building next to my garage wall. Gives me more room and less noise and dust in the shop. Just set it up that way and works well. With a nice building like yours you can put several doors or roll ups to get a nice cross flow. I have only the garage door and one door to the laundry so not much in crossflow.

I have bright white block walls but would rather have wood walls with a natural finish. I don't know if its the rustic feel or just seems more "woodshop" like.
Dont forget to design/ build a nice cabinet system. Like a whole wall of them with a desk too. Uppers and lowers to keep everything organized. Also a miter saw station, clamp storage rack, lumber rack, plywood rack, rolling cart, assembly table, sink, bathroom, and tools!!!
Sincerely, Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 01:54:05 GMT, John T. Howard

Depends on your needs and what you typically plan to build. I don't have a need for additional surface to the left of my table saw; in fact, it may be in the way. I don't have an outfeed table (yet) but I set up a couple rollers that work fine when I need to rip a 4x8 sheet of ply. Nothing beats having a "human helper" occasionally.

At least four feet to the left, 6 feet to the right, and 9 feet in front and behind the blade. On one occasion, I had to turn my PM66 90 degrees to cut dentils in long moldings.

Yes! Four inch diameter PVC should work.

Yes. Install a conduit from the wall to the saw location. Not certain about your local electrical codes, but I don't see a problem with outlets flush with the surface (I see them in the mall floor scattered around--they have brass flip covers.)

That should work.

I have wallboard (painted white) and installed 6" base board to help protect the walls. Before I installed the wallboard, I went all around the shop and painted a 2" silver thin line on the floor 90 degrees from the center of each stud--that paid off later when I mounted cabinets, supports, etc. I found my walls clean up easily.

I'm fortunate that I have natural light which makes sharpening easier and the shop is brighter. I wish I had more space to store wood!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like you are doing some good planning based on the questions asked. The earlier responses provide some great input. A few thoughts:
The table saw is the heart of the shop and should probably be fairly centralized. if you think about how it will be used, it makes sense to have either open space or table surface in a rectangular area defined by 8 feet in all directions from the saw (or blade). Left side surface is optional depending on your size restrictions. Also give some thought to using the outfeed table behind the saw for under-table, drawers, storage and assembly.
I would consider running electrical under the floor. The alternates are a long extension cord (tripping hazard) or a power post from the ceiling. Both are a nuisance and if you are starting from scratch, why not?
Regarding dust collection, consider under floor, but not trapped. An earlier post made a good point regarding the problems of clogging. However, if you ran a trench, with thin side recesses for removable floor plate, you can always get to the duct for repair or cleaning. Depending on code, you might also be able to use the trench for electrical.
There is a long running debate regarding metal vs PVC for dust collection. The latest I have read says their is little actual data supporting explosion hazards of PVC ducting. There are other articles that say PVC duct can be saftied by running grounded copper wire through the duct (does this increase plugging?). Who knows? PVC is certainly the easier and lower cost option.
ANY OTHER OPINIONS OR DATA ON PVC vs. METAL DUST DUCTS?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check out these photos: <http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/workshops.shtml <http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/scrapbook/view_alone.nhtml?profile=scrapbook&UID 002>
Note the connector next to the school's band saw. No "power post" is necessary. Power from above can simply come from a cable, held into a ceiling box with a strain relief. It's cheap and easy.
If dealing with a slab and thinking of trenching, remember one point. Equippage and layout can change, sometimes often!
Also take note of how easily DC piping can be rearranged or disconnected to fix a blockage when suspended.
That said, shops with basements or crawl spaces are quite easy to wire / plumb from below, AND rearrange and repair problems.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip> I often wish I had more support to the left of the blade on my LT Unisaw. The router table I built to be the same height as the saw helps somewhat, but the outfeed table doesn't extend there. I'm left with roller stands, or people with detailed instructions to help with the off cut from ripping 4x8 sheets of ply. My outfeed table, inspired by wReckers' projects, is maybe 42" wide, and tilts up behind the saw when in use.
Were this a business, and not a hobby shop in a (former) garage, I would build a larger, fancier saw table, now precluded by the need for mobility and some sense of space conservation for other tools, etc.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John,
I'll be building my new shop next year, 30 x 36 timberframe w/slab. There are a lot of threads in past history detailing "things you would build into a new shop", but rather than telling you to go search, I'll write what I'd do. A lot of it is based on past threads and current experience.

Put as big of an outfeed and side tables on it as you can comfortably deal with. I like the idea of six feet long outfeed table. I wouldn't go to the left because you won't be able to walk past the saw while making a long cut. Extend the outfeed as wide as the side table.

For me, ten feet minimum to the rear, six to the left, the right side can be as little as zero (for a 52" table board) and beyond - up to you. My unisaw is on a mobile base, and when I use it, it gets moved within four feet of the garage door. That way, I have about 18 feet behind the saw (helpful whan you have to rip a 16' 2x12) and the whole length of my driveway as an outfeed.

Yes, PVC, and 4". I'm putting in 4" schedule 40 under the slab, with a "box" and access cover at several locations in the floor. That way, no particular machine location needs to be permanent, I can move them around and hook up to the nearest "box" with a quick-connect. The blast gates can either be in the box or above the floor, or even better, outfit each termination with a cap - that way, you don't need blast gates. Probably difficult to visualize, but you'll only need to have the cap off of branches which have a running machine hooked up.

Same deal - box in slab with outlet inside box. You can plug it it and then notch the cover of the box and put it back to keep out sawdust. Alternately, put in drop outlets in areas where you might use the saw. I don't much care for drops because things tend to get caught on them.

OK.
1/2" AC plywood, painted gloss white. I don't like OSB, but that's just me. Even painted, it still looks like OSB. I also like a section of wall to be white painted pegboard, since I like my tools to be visible and accessible.

Best - it's mine! Worst - it's too small, located in the basement (which is a mildewed, humid mess this time of year), and is used as a landfill for my family's junk most of the time. I need 15 minutes just to make enough room to use any of my machines.

No prob.
JE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.