New shop

Moved last year to a place with no shop so I need to build one now that most everything else is done. It will be concrete slab on grade. I will use 2 X 4 sleepers on the concrete with plywood over the sleepers. My last shop was done this way and I liked being able to run airlines and some wiring under the floor. Somewhere I saw a picture of a shop with a plywood floor and the plywood had 2 or 3 coats of poly on it. Anyone on the list use this approach.
Jim
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On Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 4:42:14 PM UTC-6, swalker wrote:

Assuming that you did this earlier, your actual question isn't about power access hidden in the floor. I have seen this in commercial applications an d thought it was pretty slick.

Use the right kind of plywood, and coat it with a real floor coating. Regu lar poly isn't close to being abrasion resistant enough to make a good choi ce for coating.
You have a lot of choices in clear floor coatings, and even paint. When I was a kid there were several old shops I was in that had the wood floors pa inted with "deck paint" that was a super hard oil based enamel used on meta l and wood at that time. It wore great and was easily repaired or renewabl e. With the newer products sold as "deck paint" or "deck coating" meant to coat and do minor crack filling on your backyard home deck, these products are more likely to be found as "marine deck paint" or "boat deck paint".
Robert
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On Thu, 18 Feb 2016 15:54:41 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Marine grade coating would probably work although the price of anything "marine" is going to be very expensive. I probably need to visit a store that sells coatings for hardwood floors.
Jim
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I'd take pictures and with measurements. Once sheeted, you might need to find a board to tie to or a raceway.
I did that on my library.
Martin
On 2/18/2016 4:41 PM, swalker wrote:

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I should have been clear in my question.
I didn't think about what plywood to use but comments on this would be welcome.
And what kind of coating to use.
I used porch/deck paint before and it didn't hold up well but at the time the shop floor got a whole lot more abuse than this one will.
Jim

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On Fri, 19 Feb 2016 09:29:43 -0600

budget is always important
but there are one or two places that sell used data center raised flooring
meant for heavy stuff and traffic but not sure about a dusty environ
probably not cheap but it is modular
if you go plywood you would want to use the best you can afford and be prepared to maintain the floor how much head space do you have because if you have enough you could go with 2x6 or 2x8 etc and have some storage in the floor
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One more question to consider... And this time with punctuation. :-)
How are you going to remove the pieces of the floor when you need to get to the stuff underneath? A 4x8 sheet of plywood is awfully big...
Puckdropper
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On Fri, 19 Feb 2016 17:00:20 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

That's an important point. Almost requires some sort of modular flooring in smaller sizes (32"x32"?). Or a preternatural ability to know all future electrical requirements :-).
If moving equipment around is not a requirement, I'd just seal the plywood and put down some sort of resilient flooring or mats.
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On 2/19/2016 11:00 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Pretty sure Captain Obvious will have a "goes-without-saying", non-punctuated, answer for you. lol
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I hadn't considered the need to get underneath because in 17 years in my last shop I never had a reason to. The airlines were copper pipe and the wiring never a problem.
I should ponder this some more but removing a sheet of plywood is possible unless it is T&G. Might need some help even then.
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All you need to do is cut openings for removable pieces, say 2' x 2' in the appropriate spots, re enforced for rolling over, and you can slide what you need to have under the flooring later on.
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I can see where that might work. Thanks for that.
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On Thu, 18 Feb 2016 16:41:59 -0600

fyi raised floors in data centers are fast becoming obsolete so maybe you can find a data center that is converting back to slab and fan walls
is your equipment stationary
if it is then you could have grates and dust collectors in the floor
you might be the envy of the woodworking community
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Data center raised flooring is very often concrete filled metal panels sitt ing in a gridwork of steel framing on pedestals adhered to the slab at prec ise locations...special vacuum/suction cup lifters are usually required to set and/or lift and the panels are HEAVY (with plenty of punctuation) A link to typical installation follows: https://www.accessfloorsystems.com/index.php/home-installation-guide/
On Friday, February 19, 2016 at 1:33:30 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

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wrote in message

An issue with raised flooring that may come into play with this shop is the amount of head room available and the height difference between the doors and the raised floor... raised floors from computer centers burn up a lot of space. Not that this couldn't be designed around but it would drive the cost up. The 2X sleepers would be a cost effective alternative and still provide chases for wiring and air lines. The raised floor system might be justified however if an extensive dust collection piping system were to be constructed under it... there was no mention of that in the OP's message however.
Depending upon the climate it may make sense to insulate the floor system... or at least provide a thermal break by putting sill sealer foam between the sleepers and concrete. This can make a big difference in comfort and in the air conditioning costs (heating and/or cooling).
Re the flooring, 3/4" T&G subflooring on 2x4 sleepers is a good start. Depending upon how good the concrete job turns out, if you want a truly flat floor you will may have to scribe the sleepers but that is not a big deal. I had my sons scribe a 16x22 foot room for me when they were about 7 and 9 years old... After the first sleeper I didn't check any more as it was perfect. I just cut what they marked using my bandsaw. They did a fine job (they were a lot closer to the floor back then!). I also left the floor independent of the walls with a small gap that was insulated. The drywall and baseboard covers the gap. A similar approach could be used in a shop to leave access to the chases for future runs... maybe a 1x4 or 1x6 border that is screwed down? A flat level floor can be handy for getting bench and tool top heights to match and co-planer and it is real handy to have a flat and level floor when assembling things. Finish... I'd probably use a good floor paint after priming with tinted primer (to help hide future scratches). I put poly on a couple sheet good shop floors in the past and they were nothing to write home about... if looks are important.
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On Fri, 19 Feb 2016 15:02:16 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

I am in AL so we don't really get a lot of cold weather but we do get some hot and humid days. The shop will have AC and heat. Heat type to be determined.
One thing I absolutely need to remember is to make sure that the wall covering does not overlap the floor along the edges. Removing the floor would be very difficult without cutting the drywall.
A perfectly flat floor isn't really all that necessary as long as I can level the equipment.
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On Fri, 19 Feb 2016 10:31:01 -0800, Electric Comet

Truly raised floors like in data centers is not something I want to even attempt to do.
I am mostly a wood turner and my 16X42 inch lathe, once leveled will not be moved. Ditto for other items.
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On Fri, 19 Feb 2016 18:26:01 -0600

are you going to route your dust collection under the floor too
if your equpment is stationary having grates in places might be nice
turn on the dust collector and sweep into the in floor grate
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