New shop

Building new shop 30x40 with concrete floor. I want to put several electrical recepticles in the floor that are flush with the concrete for my table saw and other tools. Does anyone have experience with this - pro or con. I hate having cords hanging or lying around.
TIA, Dan
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If they're flush, you stand the chance of rolling a tool over them etc.
The shops I've seen have a pedestal the size of a work box that the outlets go into from the side.
+----+ floor --+ | | <-- outlets here V | | ----------------------------------
NJBrad
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Only comment that I would make is that one of the best features of my shop is the ability to easily reconfigure the workspace and the assembly locations to fit the types of projects I'm working on right now. End tables, chairs, wall clocks, kitchen cabinets, headboards for king-sized beds - all seem to work better with different shop layouts.
I think that the only feature I haven't moved in the last year is the wood rack, and that's because it's really full.
Allow yourself the flexibility to have a better idea down the road somewhere. Somebody better qualified than I will offer an opinion about flush mounting electrics in the floor.
Patriarch
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Dan wrote:

There are a number of manufactures that make recessed steel floor mounted boxes for electrical outlets. In the shop I'd opt for one that has a hinged steel lid that closes flush with the floor when not in use. I've included a link to one supplier so you can get some idea of what's available.
http://tnbelectricalworld.tnb.com/contractor/docs/sc_infloor_systems_floorboxes.pdf
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Sun, Jul 11, 2004, 10:10pm snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (Nova) <snip> In the shop I'd opt for one that has a hinged steel lid that closes flush with the floor when not in use. <snip>
Yeah, I've seen that type. If nothing else, they should keep sawdust out of the sockets.
Gotta go with Patriarch tho, I'd be moving stuff. If I had a choice, I'd have everything in the ceiling.
Making a success of the job at hand is the best step toward the kind you want. - Bernard M. Baruch More likely, your boss gets a raise and/or promotion, from getting credit for your work. - JOAT
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my
Hi Dan,
Don't forget to check your local zoning codes to be sure you can use what you are looking for. It would be bad to hear the inspector say, "Hey, you can't do that here." (wait... here's the bad part) "You have to tear that out."
Chris
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Dan -
As for water, others here would likely know more, but how about a GFCI circuit breaker for all of your floor mounted outlets and then installing weather resistant gasketed outlets...As the other post mentioned, the outlet would probably not be truly flush, and that would help. If you drop a can o'thinnner, I dunno... pray!
I am soon going to be pouring a slab for a shop as well. I am considering installing a dust collection duct in the floor for the TS and Jointer, et al. I may put the whole mess in a channel through the center of the slab. I am on the fence about radiant heat, tho... kinda want to do it....
Anyway, my 2c..
John Moorhead

or
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I assume there is NO possibility that you might EVER want to hose out the shop for any reason? I would prefer my outlets to be higher to give me the flexibility to do that should I decide to. Maybe not you, but the next person that buys it from you?
Wayne

my
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 19:39:53 GMT, "NoOne N Particular"

I look at it as the flexibility to drop a wide open can of paint thinner. <G>
Barry
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my
The floor outlets that are approved for residential use have cast iron round boxes that are about 3/8" thick - seriously heavy-duty. The trims are very robust and the covers that I've seen are machined brass. If the rough box is installed flush with the surrounding (sub)floor, the trim and cover rise up 3/8" - 1/2" (not truly flush).
Maybe the ticket would be to bring 110v, 220v and DC to 12"x12" voids in the 'crete (6'x6' grid?) that are covered with a steel plate?
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Thanks for all the response. All this advice now has me re-thinking. I don't want to make a decison that I will regret.
Dan

my
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The beauty of the wReck is that we can (hopefully) learn from others experiences, and avoid learning the dangerous and expensive lessons in person.
Patriarch
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