New Sewing Room Project

My wife owns and is the controller of the upstairs in our house. It is dedicated to her quilt making.
We have decided to get those rooms in order after almost being in the new house for 3 years. We are starting with the "long arm" sewing machine lower cabinets. For those not familiar the long arm sewing machine has a foot print of approximately 48" x 132". I have designed two lower cabinets, each 60" long for this large tool to set on. There will be a 12" gap between the two cabinets. The base of the long arm machine base is 16" long front to back and has arms that support the quilt front, back, and center padding extend approximately 30" total front and back. Anyway the cabinets are going to be 22.5" deep, 30" tall and 60" long. The machine is currently setting on top of a 72" and a 60" fold up lunch room style tables.
I picked up materials on Thursday last week and this morning began the glue up of the carcases. Once again I am using my double face frame construction with no screws or nails, all dado's, lap joints, domino floating tenons, and glue construction for this stage.
The cabinets will have a maple plywood body with poplar for the hard wood parts. The exterior will be painted a light mint green color with oil based alkyd paint. Interior coated with varnish.
This first picture shows the 5 dado's in the back face frame. The cabinet bottom outer sides and inner panels will engage the face frame via those dado's.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821791005/in/photostream/
This picture shows the bottom of the cabinet sitting in the back face frame bottom rail and one of the end panels leaning up against it. The end panels engage the face frame outer stile dado and the bottom panel engages the side panel dado.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821799055/in/photostream/
Next is basically the same with both outer panels engaged with the back face frame and outer bottom panel. You can see where the inner panels will engage the bottom panel dado's and the back face frame inner stile dado's
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821943994/in/photostream/
Next a more close up view
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821810715/in/photostream/
Next, a shot of all panels and the back face frame. There are 9 dado's that have been filled at this point. The face frames were glued up with out the aid of the panels and their dado's. Often I will dry fit the panels and assemble and glue the face frames on top of the edges of the panels to insure accurate placement of the center stiles. I used waxed paper between the dry fit panels and the face frame to keep them from sticking together from the glue squeeze out. In this case and on the TV console project I took a leap of faith and assembled the face frames and the panels according to my drawings. Basically 14 dado's and 7 different sections have to come together perfectly on 7 different planes. Unfortunately with using this method a mistake can mean the need to rebuild the face frames and or panel sections if the fit is not perfect on the dry fit. The up side is that if every thing is perfect, the assembly goes much more quickly. This is the 20th and 21st cabinets that I have built with the front and back face frame method in the past 3 years and so far all has gone well with out a problem. I may have said this before, ;!), I could not do this as quickly or as accurately as I do with out the aid of Sketchup and the Cutlist 4.x component import program that accurately takes the drawings measurements of it's components and imports them into CutList Plus. This import program eliminates the possibility of entering component data incorrectly into CutList Plus.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821846136/in/photostream/
Next the complete assembly with the "front face frame added to the top of the assembly. FWIW the back face frame and front face frame are not identical, because of the lap and floating tennon joinery I use on the back face frame the back rails and inner stiles are 1" longer than the ones on the front. This just adds to the complexity of the assembly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10821850756/in/photostream/
Lastly, inside of one of the compartments as seen from the top looking down to the bottom. All joints are dadoed.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/10822136283/in/photostream/
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On 11/12/2013 11:43 AM, Leon wrote:

Looking good, damned good, as usual!
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On 11/12/2013 2:59 PM, Swingman wrote:

Come hang your doors on it and save me some time. ;~)
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On 11/12/2013 12:43 PM, Leon wrote:

132" wow, I should be glad my wife only has a working (actually it just humms when she uses it) 1911 Singer treadle machine. Parts are getting hard to find though, if something important breaks it may just become a piece of furniture.
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Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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On 11/12/2013 3:31 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

We have one of those pedal Singer models too. I inherited it from my Grandmother. My dad ,now 90, worked the foot pedal platform when he was a kid.
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On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 3:31:01 PM UTC-6, FrozenNorth wrote:

of the upstairs in our house. It is > dedicated to her quilt making. > > We have decided to get those rooms in order after almost being in the > new h ouse for 3 years. We are starting with the "long arm" sewing > machine lowe r cabinets.
Neat project, one I can, somewhat, relate to, having built a much less refi ned support table and side table for my long arm upholstery machine (now go ne, sold it). I'm anxious to see the finished project.
> 132" wow, I should be glad my wife only has a working (actually it just humms when she uses it) 1911 Singer treadle machine. Parts are getting hard to find though, if something important breaks it may just become a piece o f furniture. -- Froz... The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
This guy, Jimster100, in Oakland, Ca. seems to have a pretty good supply of old parts. About 2 yrs ago, I restored a Singer model 15, needed a few pa rts. Found them here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/POWER-SUPPLY-CORD-FOR-SINGER -MODEL-201-/390697188593?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5af75dfcf1#ht_6 3wt_1125
One aspect, of several, I needed: The treadle machines were able to be upg raded with an adapter, to use AC or DC power supply (the adpapter could be wired for either), depending on what external power a person (especially so meone in a rural area) may have had to hook up to, and the related mechanic al parts. Jimster100 had (still has?) the parts. Might want to keep him i n mind.
Sonny
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On 11/13/2013 12:54 PM, Sonny wrote:

Ill post pictures of the monster and the cabinets when it is all done.
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wrote:

I hope I know enough about you that you have determined you can get it up the stairs. LOL
Mike M
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On 11/12/2013 10:43 AM, Leon wrote:

Sheesh, don't you ever slow down?
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gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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On 11/12/2013 4:24 PM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

I get bored quickly.
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Having know several folks who sewed and made things for them, I can relate. I have made "thread racks" that stored literally hundreds of spool of thread. And a number of sewing (and serger) tables/cabinets. But I have never made anything for a 132" monster. I think that many shop tools would take up less space! That is 11 feet long! Maybe you could install a fold out bed in the side of this thing!
Quilters are an interesting species. I am married to one. They do certain things very well and other things not so well. You must be careful in your approach to them and how you speak to them. And be particularly tuned into them when you make something for them..
My sympathies bro! Hang in there. Hopefully the quilting gods will smile upon you.
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On 11/12/2013 4:45 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Yes they are!
I am married to one. They do

Yes!

She is a good cook too. ;~)
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The mother of all under statements!
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Leon, maybe this item may be of interest: Even with my much less glamorous sewing table (extension), I quickly noticed a problem with it: the 90 degr ee corners would catch the fabric, as I would sew.
I initially made a left side extension table (you can see it at the top of the pic; the sewing machine is to the right, out of the picture - http://w ww.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/10949570714/), but found I needed an addi tional "leaf", just to the left of my chair, as I sat sewing. I ended up c utting the corners off the leaf, because they repeatedly caught and held th e fabric, as I would sew. I'm sure a rounded corner would have worked, als o.
Maybe question your wife as to her possibly having a similar issue with a p revious sharp cornered table, if you and she haven't already considered/dis cussed a similar past issue, as this.... *Take care of a possible problem- issue before it shows itself.
Sonny
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On 11/19/2013 2:06 PM, Sonny wrote:

Well thanks for thinking about me Sonny. For the current cabinets I used a 1/8" round over bit for the tops. That said the fabric will never really come in contact with the cabinets. The fabtic is would up on 11' poles.
Something like this except with out the table and legs portion. I am building the cabinets for that purpose.
http://www.handiquilter.com/shop/product/hq-10-hq-studio-frame/
I will however be adding an 8' sewing table, phase II, for both her normal and embroidery machines. And there will also be a large wall cabinet, phase III.
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