New Ridgid Tablesaw

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The cracking has a lot to do with selection. Natural fissures occur, but can be found ahead of use. Chip? Well, that takes a bit too. Something that chips granite, will likely damage/pit cast iron as well. It will out-wear cast iron by a long shot too. That stuff takes diamonds to machine.
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"Robatoy" wrote

Used two part epoxy to glue the wood "backsplash" on this 'kitchen desk' last year:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/3811kit-11.jpg
A month later someone apparently hit it with enough of a 'shear' force to knock it loose and chip the granite, leaving 1/4" deep pits where the glue had been applied. The granite chips were still neatly bonded to the wood and the wood was not damaged, so it certainly appears that the epoxy indeed weakened the granite?
Decided I didn't want to repeat the process, so I drilled 1/4" holes through the granite and ply substrate under each foot, applied some construction adhesive, and ran a wood screw into the wooden feet from underneath. I figured a mechanical fastener would hopefully preclude a future service call, and there have been no reported problems since (now that that was said out loud, just watch the phone ring tomorrow!).
The question: what would *you* have used as an adhesive in the first place if forced into a similar situation?
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I doubt the epoxy penetrated the stone surface by 1/4" and compromised the material. What likely happened is the material directly under the adhesive spots failed in direct shear, as concrete would in similar circumstance. I would expect to find 45 degree cones under the spots of adhesive.

Depends on edge distance. The expected failure mode is still direct shear, this time from the bored hole to the edge. The backsplash likely will now fail first.

It isn't a matter of which adhesive. The epoxy held. The failure was in the substrate, the granite. Approach the problem as though the desktop were high strength concrete. How many anchors, how deep, how far from the edge, would you use if it were concrete?
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"Swingman" wrote:

Like you, my first impulse would have been epoxy; however, on 2nd thought, the epoxy cured and provided a connection which transmitted the impact to the granite, resulting in failure.
A good adhesive such as Sikaflex 291 or 3M 5200 would provide a good bond while absorbing enough of the impact energy to avoid granite failure.
IMHO, mechanical fasteners should be avoided.
If you do use them, make sure holes in granite have clearance to provide float.
BTW, the epoxy didn't attack the granite, it was simply stronger in an impact application.
HTH
Lew
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Swingman wrote:

What, you couldn't find any more wood to trim out between crown-n-crown? :-p
Nice work.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

I think I would have glued a small trim piece to the granite and the divider to the trim piece. That is, install a "weaker link" than the granite itself.
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No rust is another benefit. Ease of assembly of extensions is another. Much lower vibration overall is a prime benefit.
This is a good saw made better by the extra mass. On the one here, the extension wings weighed 54 pounds each, compared to the Jet's cast iron 40 pounders.
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Machined pulley and multiple V belt are part of the Ridgid package.
I've had one here for checking out, and it's an astonishing saw for the price--$599.
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I have a Delta contractor saw with stock pulleys and belt. Except immediately after sitting unused for long periods, it starts up fast and smooth. The nickel doesn't fall down until well into its wind down after powering off. It probably helps that it's running on 220V. Start up is close to immediate.
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Great, I had a Craftsman iron top that passed the nickel test, but IMHO the nickel test is a starting point indicator that you are headed in the right direction in dampening vibration. My cabinet saw passes the nickel test with less movement than the old saw and I get better results with this saw over the Craftsman. The less vibration you have the better the cuts, all things being equal.
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It certainly looks like a fine saw. The granite top makes a whole lot of sense, although I worry a bit about the t-track. But a properly selected slab of granite is some tough. Any wee pits and chips are easily filled and levelled.
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