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My K4 has a metal insert that keeps the bit from digging in the plastic. That metal insert is sharp! Use a acuum, compressed air or brush to clean it, and not your fingers!
Puckdropper
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Yes. It is sad.

In yer opinion.
I've already dealt with enough plastic in my life. I'm getting into woodworking cuz I wanna get away from plastic.
Yeah, I know. There is still gonna be tons o' plastic around the shop. Try and find some hand power tools that are still all metal, like my '70 Milwaukee all-metal-casing 1/2" drill motor. Fat chance.
I'm cleaning out my late mother's property. Jes today, I've already found 3 almost new pwr tools. Two corded orb sanders (hope one has a dust blwr) and and an ultra cheap B&D bat drill motor. Now I have 3 orb sanders, four battery drill motors, 2 Skil saws (gave the worm-drive away), and they all are mostly plastic construction.
Another reason I dislike plastic: Know what a Robot Coupe immersion blender is?
<http://www.basequipment.com/Robot-Coupe-MP550-TURBO-21-Immersion-Blender-p/rob-mp550.htm Our model cost over $600, yet it fell over in the kitchen and the plastic handle broke into a dozen pieces when it hit the kitchen floor (which is always present). Oops! Last time I saw it, it was a Red Green special.
nb
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Well if you do not like plastic Kreg pocket hole jigs ( I do ) Lee Valley has it covered.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?pB329&cat=1,180,42311
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These products are "no longer available", but thank you for answering. ;)
nb
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On 3/21/2016 4:23 PM, notbob wrote:

a predisposition of a particular material used for something that it is perfectly suited for. There is another poster here that is mispositioned against Jet because of a faulty set screw or something like that, and he has pretty much shunned the brand because of ignorance. I would dare say that the brand is better than what he has produced.
Anyway, keep an eye out for those in this group that "do" rather than give opinions. Those people have a long list of woodworking accomplishments and got there with a good solid knowledge about what they are talking about.
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Kinda funny, as Jet usta be considered cheap junk. Now --while not exactly in Bridgeport territory-- it's more upscale, pricey, acceptable. More than jes junk. (or is it?)

You make a good point and one that will not be lost on me. I know how to ignore trolls and my KF works better than most. Plus, I know how to spot those that "do" vs those who jes talk. Thank you for the advice. ;)
nb
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On 3/22/2016 9:32 AM, notbob wrote:

Jet has been pretty good for at least 20 years. FWIW a lot of Powermatic and Jet differ only in color and name and maybe a few design enhancements. Both are owned by the same company.

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On 3/21/2016 10:41 AM, notbob wrote:

Yes, AND there many more correct ways to build drawers than to misuse biscuit joinery.
If they indeed do that, you should run the other way down that road as fast as you can, as there is a no more shoddy way to build a drawer than to use biscuit joinery ... a guaranteed, unarguably, misguided FAIL from the get go.
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Not the way I plan to go. Still, my buddy has a biscuit joiner tool.
I was thinking the cheapest entry would be box joints. Buy a good saw, a good chisel, and some glue. Then, borrow a boatload of clamps.
Anyone make a good joinery saw fer under $50? (saw handle). No way I can afford one of those Rob Cosman thingies. 8|
nb
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Have a look: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pX686&cat=1,42884
(This page was the top result for "Lee Valley Japanese Saw Set", if you'd prefer to go through Google first. ;-) )
Lee Valley is kinda the woodworking toystore, so you'll probably spend more money than you think. But as a machinist you'll understand.
I love these saws, they're easy to use and accurate. Now, if only I could teach myself to use these saws to their full potential.
Pull saws like this bend and wreck easily, so you must be careful as you're cutting. Take it easy and let the tool do the work. These are not tools that impose your will upon the wood, but rather tools that allow you to bring out the joint hidden in the wood.
Puckdropper
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On 3/21/2016 10:41 AM, notbob wrote:

Baltic birch is a good material for a relatively inexpensive, but long lasting, with the proper joinery, drawer boxes.
A good, medium strong joint for the plywood drawer box is a locking rabbet joint. A joinery method that will stand the test of time in any drawer that uses up to a 100 lb drawer slide, and is MUCH stronger than a biscuit joint for the repeated forces a drawer must eventually withstand.
The locking rabbet joint can be made on either a router table using a "locking rabbet" bit set, or on the table saw.
Keep in mind that many full service hardwood lumber yards carry pre-finished, plywood drawer side material, in varying widths (but usually 6' lengths), with a groove pre-cut for 1/4" plywood bottoms, which can also be found pre-finished with the same polyurethane finish as the sides.
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I thought the biscuit joint would be stronger. I'll hafta look up a "locking rabbet joint".

I'm in the boonies, the high Colorado Rockies, so no HDs or Lowe's around here. Heck, the lumber yards aren't even open on Sun! :)
nb
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I finally looked up "locking rabbet" joint. Very interesting, but will it work on 1/2" sides?
nb
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On 3/21/2016 9:23 PM, notbob wrote:

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Excellent!
I think you've made my choice, for me. I called our best lumberyard/tool/cabinet shop and they sed they do not carry pre-prepped sides in length, so I was looking for the joint which would cost me the least in tools. So far, yer locking rabbet joint looks to meet my criteria better than any other joint. So, thank you for teaching me about a joint I was not even aware of.
I have a buddy, a master carpenter, who has a boatload of tools, so I can barrow many from him. He definitely has a couple routers. Maybe even a table. The stuff he definitely doesn't have, I'll purchase. Today or tomorow, I'm buying the 1/4" size of these:
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?pq290&cat=1,41504
....as I or my buddy have nary a decent chisel fer miles. Next month, I plan on a 1/2" B&D Sweetheart sckt chisel.
I've got my late brother's chisel (1"), but couldn't understand why it was essentially ruined, the front edge reduced to a jagged wreck. I later overheard someone talking (youtube?) about how carpenters always carry a chisel to cut framing nails. Yikes! So that's what happened to that poor chisel. That's a trick my brother never taught me.
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On 3/22/2016 10:05 AM, notbob wrote:

Actually the was Swingman that pointed out the locking rabbet joint.
I mostly use this joint. It requires a sizeable investment for a Festool Domino.
This is my Flickr account so you are probably safe in clicking. ;~)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/5471710794/in/dateposted-public/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/5471112571/in/dateposted-public/
And FWIW I typically make drawers with 1/2" Baltic birch plywood. Here before assembly
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/24382723850/in/dateposted-public/
After assembly but before the reinforcement Domino tenons added, as seen an the above links.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/24050071344/in/dateposted-public/

Or open paint cans. ;~)
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On Sunday, March 20, 2016 at 3:37:59 PM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

Leon! ;-)
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On 3/20/2016 2:37 PM, notbob wrote:

1/32" is a worthy goal to shoot for, as it is easy to see on most measuring devices with 1/16" indices ... and it also lets you interpolate to +/- 1/64th when the need arises ... and it does:
A 1/64" gap on a joint is readily apparent. ;)
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Yeah, I know. I usta be able to judge a .005" gap. Now I'm old. Gotta wear cheaters. :(
nb
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On 3/20/2016 2:37 PM, notbob wrote:

FWIW I am currently working with 4 sheets of MDO. It is 97/128" thick. I used my digital caliper to set up my dado set to cut a groove for that material. While it is a good idea to work or design around 1/16" increments expect to run into instances where you need to be more accurate than that for pieces to fit together.
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