New poster/woodworker

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Howdy. My name is notbob, I run a Linux desktop, and I am a new member cuz my kitchen drawers are falling apart and I need to learn how to fix them. Since the entire house (mfd home) is fiberboard and long abuse by my late mother has it falling apart, it's time to learn some decent cabinetry.
I know jes enough about general carpentry that I'm totally fearless. Spent 8 mos framing houses. Boy, can I ever neaten up a lumber pile! Plus, as a former machinist and my late brother having been a master carpenter, I've already got a lot of those tools.
Anyway, already discovered some joinery (dove, box, biscuit, etc) and learned which tools my buddy already has (biscuit jointer, router) ....and which I need to buy (router table, dovetail jig, etc).
I can see me doing a new face frame and drawers outta (Baltic?) birch and some other cabinetry stuff. Looks like big fun. I'm looking forward to posting, here. If I get good enough, might try a guitar spkr cabinet with all dovetail joinery, like I usta have (mesa boogie mk II).
nb
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If I might make a suggestion, build your own router table. You can find plans on-line, and most router tables are done in the same style as a kitchen cabinet, so you'll be exercising the same skills you'll want for the kitchen re-hab.
John
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I gotta clear out one of my late mother's sheds. One of them would be perfect as a workshop. I've been looking at plans fer everything --benches, tables, jigs, etc-- but have not run across DIY plans fer a router table.
I think I'll need one with a "lift". Is a lift for the purpose of allowing a rounter to do plunge-cuts from sed same router table?
I've so much to learn. ;)
nb
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says...

The main thing the lift gives you is precise control of the protrusion of the bit above the table using a control that you access from above the table. There are some routers now that have the same sort of capability built-in or easily addable.
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On Sunday, March 13, 2016 at 12:40:42 PM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

Where have you been looking?
A simple Google search of _DIY router table_ returns a ridiculous number of hits.
Just as an example, one such hit...
http://freebies.about.com/od/free-plans/tp/free-router-table-plans.htm
...leads to this...
http://www.ana-white.com/2012/07/plans/patrick039s-router-table
...and this...
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/american-woodworker-router-table
There are probably hundreds of plans to choose from on ye ole interweb.

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notbob wrote:

Oh man - let google be your friend. Do a simple search - there is a ton of stuff out there for DIY plans, including lifts and all the other stuff. In fact, that may well be one of the biggest hits on DIY woodworking things.
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No, you don't do plunge cuts on a router table. If you need to start in the middle of a piece, there's three ways to do it:
1 - use your plunge router in it's normal hand-held manner. Clamp straightedges to your workpiece as needed to guide the router (I keep an assortment of longish scraps with straight edges for that purpose).
2 - with the router in the table, running, and your workpiece held at an angle above the table, butted up against a stop, carefully lower it onto the bit and then make your cut. Myself I consider this a dangerous technique and don't do it, but I've seen others do so.
3 - drill a starter hole a hair larger than the router bit, and with the router in the table put the workpiece over the bit, turn the router on and make the cut. This is how I do it to make stopped grooves and similar cuts. (*)
The purpose of the lift is simply to make it easy to adjust the bit height when the router is in the table. Particularly if it's a plunge router, the normal depth adjustment is hard to use in a table.

Gotta start somewhere, and this is (usually) a good place.
John
(* note that a lot of times it's simpler to make a thru groove, and then plug the ends with scrap stock cut to the groove's width)
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

However using the lift to raise the bit into a piece that is secured by featherboards and other controls is quite safe and can be done with good accuracy.

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On 3/13/2016 5:56 PM, John McCoy wrote:

I used to use that method making mouth blocks for Steve Knight 15 years ago.. I was lowering a chunk of 2"x3.5"x 3/8" Ipe to make two parallel 3/8" x 1.5" slots. I literally did this thousands of times. NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART. I wished there was a faster and or better way but the pieces were so small that was about my only option.
On a different note I used a 4 flute HSS end mill bit and it lasted 5~10 times longer than any carbide bits plus it cut much more smoothly when lowering the work.

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If I were doing that on a production basis, I think I'd build a table with a horizontally mounted router and a sliding sled to hold the workpiece. Slide the sled and workpiece into the bit, then move the workpiece along the sled's fence to make the groove.
I've seen pictures of a rig like that used to make tenons for chair slats.
John
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I've seen a buncha U2B videos on routers and they look like a hoot!
I really like the router table lift kits.
I've seen "sleds" fer table saws, but have no clue as to yer "horizontally" mounted, sliding sled, router. ;)
nb
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On 3/14/2016 2:23 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Basically it was 200~300 slots at a time every 2~4 months for about 4 years and that was it. It actually went pretty quickly, 4~6 hours on the slots for each run. But there was the resawing, planing, cutting to width and length and cutting a 45 on one end. Tough on the fingers holding that wood, 3 times harder than oak and the edges were sharp.

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wrote:

So the coffin smoother I bought from Steve very likely has passed through your hand Leon, thanks.
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On 3/15/2016 7:30 AM, Markem wrote:

Very likely if you bought between 1999 and 2006 ish. But only the mouth block, not the whole smoother. ;~)
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Amusingly enough, that's one reason I built *my* router table - it was practice for my dining room cabinets!
http://www.delorie.com/wood/projects/router/
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Beautiful table and thank you for the link.
Unfortunately, I do not have that kinda $$$$ and prolly will not be bying any of that stuff (too much plastic). Oh, I have plenty of dial indicators and other machinist tools, but who makes wood cuts closer than 1/64 of an inch (~0.015")?
Right now, I'm running around trying to bum pipe clamps from my neighbors. ;)
nb
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*snip*

A very cheap clamp is the humble wood screw. Naturally, it leaves a woodscrew sized hole in whatever you're clamping. You just have to allow for that and screw on the off-cut side.
Puckdropper
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On 2016-03-21, Puckdropper <puckdropper> wrote:

Yes. The first joint I researched is the pocket-hole joint. I also have a fiberboard face frame cross-piece (15"x1-5/8"x9/16") that ripped out cuz the pkt-hls failed for the usual fiberboard reasons. I kinda like the pkt-hl joint, but do NOT like the plastic tools Kreg makes to do the job. Anyone have any experience with the all-metal HF jig?
Our local cabinetry shop, which got me started down this seemingly endless road, makes its drawer boxes with baltic birch (ply), using biscuit joints. Is there a cheaper alternative to BB ply?
I have to replace the drawers, one at a time. I figure I'll use 1/2" b.birch fer the box and use a different joint (biz, box, dove, etc) with each drawer, depending on which tools --and how many clamps!-- I have access to, at that time. When I have the tools and knowledge, I'll attempt the full face frame and countertop.
Now, I need to replace all the decayed rubber parts on my B&D Workbench 225. Boy, did that thing ever fall apart, suddenly. Oh yeah ....and replace those crappy fiberboard slats (work-top?) before they go south! ;)
nb
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 11:41:27 AM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

Speaking of pocket holes and biscuits, I used my Kreg jig to mock up a 5/4" x 8" x 38" square frame for the pot rack I'm making. Once it had SWMBO's approval, I took out the screws and used 4 biscuits at each joint, clamping the frame while the glue dried. Just before I walked away I looked down on the table and saw the screws lying there. Then I looked at the pocket holes in the frame.
I paused, I hesitated, I tried to walk away. I just couldn't do it. Back in went the screws. 4 biscuits and 2 pocket screws per joint. The wall will come down before this thing falls apart. ;-)
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On 3/21/2016 10:41 AM, notbob wrote:

Too bad. Nothing at all wrong with the newer injection molded plastic Kreg jigs.
AAMOF, I gave my old metal K2 of yore away because it did not allow use of dust collection to keep the holes clear ... a real PITA with the old K2 when production cutting a kitchen full of face frames.
Built literally thousands of FF's using the newer Kreg with nary a problem.
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