New planer - advice before I use it?

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Just got a Ridgid planer.. pretty basic and looks a bit like the pictures of a Delta...
I've never had or used one before but since I got a real table saw recently, this seemed like the next step...
Being too old and lazy to reinvent the wheel, I'd appreciate and tips, warnings, "don't do's", etc. from you in the group that use them.
I think a few of you were born using them (-;
Ridgid tp1300 13" planer...
So far, I've put the stand together, put BIG casters on it, (it goes in the carport on a packed dirt floor), adjusted the infeed/outfeed tables, the cutter head and such, as called for in the manual...
I haven't turned it on yet... waiting for advice and a project the requires it.... I sure wish I had it last month when I made the wife 3 sets of book shelves!
TIA for any suggestions, warnings, DAMHIKT, etc..
mac
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<snip>
Never plane to much off of one face at a time. The board will begin to bow in the direction of the face being planed. DAMHIKT!
NEVER plane a board that is to short. It can kick throw the board back at you into your fingers that are pushing the board. DAMHIKT!
Don't feed your fingers into the planer knives!
Learn how to sharpen your own knives. See my web page below:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/jigsfixtures.htm
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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You probably all ready know this one, but for the original poster, this might be new . . .
Typically, you don't want to put anything through the planer that's less than about 12". If you do need to plane something that is less than 12", an easy and safe way to do it is to glue on some side runners that are 12" long. If you've got a piece that's say 6" long and then add two 12" pieces on each of the edges, it might look something like this bit of ASCII art:
+-+ +-+ | | | | | | | | | | | | | |+------+| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |+------+| | | | | | | | | | | | | | +-+ +-+
After getting the piece to the desired thickness, just cut off the side runners.
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Sun, Jun 24, 2007, 9:52am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@atww.org.invalid (MichaelFaurot) <snip> If you do need to plane something that is less than 12", an easy and safe way to do it is to glue on some side runners that are 12" long. <snip>
I made a nifty planer sled that clamps the piece in, no gluing needed. Works like a charm. The planer sled is 100% wood, held together by glue, 100% wood cam clamps.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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J T wrote:
| I made a nifty planer sled that clamps the piece in, no gluing | needed. Works like a charm. The planer sled is 100% wood, held | together by glue, 100% wood cam clamps.
Can/would you post photos? I've thought about doing this, but never managed to come up with a design I thought would be worth building...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Sun, Jun 24, 2007, 6:29pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth plead thusly: Can/would you post photos? I've thought about doing this, but never managed to come up with a design I thought would be worth building...
Okey dokey, i'll see if i can remember to take the camera out there. Won't guarantee the quality of the pictures - maybe I'd best try to take two cameras. If I'm going to that much trouble I mig as well try to get some decent shots of my router table too. I dun good on that. And, seeing as my saw needs some adjusting from below, might's well take it off the base now and get some pictures of the base, it's kinda sorta art deco, or something. Might's well take pictures of some my masters too, and the dog, corporate iggle. Anything else? LOL
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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J T wrote: | Sun, Jun 24, 2007, 6:29pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (Morris Dovey) | doth plead thusly: | Can/would you post photos? I've thought about doing this, but never | managed to come up with a design I thought would be worth | building... | | Okey dokey, i'll see if i can remember to take the camera out | there. Won't guarantee the quality of the pictures - maybe I'd best | try to take two cameras. If I'm going to that much trouble I mig | as well try to get some decent shots of my router table too. I dun | good on that. And, seeing as my saw needs some adjusting from | below, might's well take it off the base now and get some pictures | of the base, it's kinda sorta art deco, or something. Might's well | take pictures of some my masters too, and the dog, corporate iggle. | Anything else? LOL
Well, the planer sled with cam clamps all by itself would of been pretty good. I've built a couple of cam clamps, and found 'em useful. If you've built some, I might learn something new from seeing 'em. I'm interested in just about anything that can be made in the shop that makes woodworking easier and/or more satisfying. There's a lot of stuff that isn't sold in stores or is too expensive to buy, that can be owner-built from scraps, glue, and some careful work.
The router table'd be a bonus. I bought mine 'cause I was in a rush to get a job done. It's a good table, but I don't like it as well as some I've seen that people have built for themselves. Best part of my router table is the little mini-cyclone separator I built to use with.
Y'know, until I stumbled onto r.w, I'd never seen or heard of a table saw sled - and the simple on I cobbled together has become one of the most important tools in my shop. If you have the camera in your hand and you think someone might benefit from seeing a picture - take it!
Not sure about iggle. I'll leave that up to you. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Tue, Jun 26, 2007, 1:49am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth sayeth: <snip> Not sure about iggle. I'll leave that up to you.
OH yeah, you definitely need to see the iggle too. LOL
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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Tue, Jun 26, 2007, 1:49am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth sayeth: <snip> The router table'd be a bonus. I bought mine 'cause I was in a rush to get a job done. It's a good table, but I don't like it as well as some I've seen that people have built for themselves. Best part of my router table is the little mini-cyclone separator I built to use with. <snip> I am very happy with the router table. I'll get a bulb for my light so I should be able to get decent pictures. It's kinda basic, no cabinet, et al, no fence - yet, because I don't need one, yet. But went together quickly, except for glue drying tme, came out probably better than I had expected, and works even better than I had hoped. My shop is small, so no DC or anything, still figuring on where I can reasnably put one, so the sawdust just shoots toward the back. Should be easy enough to hook up something tho.
It's attached to a shelf. I think that if it was on a cabinet, free-standing, I'd have a hinged, or lift-off, top on it. Because I tend to do a numbe of pieces on it, then move elsewhere to continue work on them. That would give me an extra work surface when the router wasn't being used - I've got a lift-off that goes on the wood lathe stand, and that works out great. Being bolted to the shelf is good tho, it's low enough to sit using it, and with my back, and joints, that's a blessing. If it was free-standing I think I'd still want it low enough to sit to use.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 23:54:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Damn... hate to put ya to work, bro, but I appreciate..
mac
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 19:02:40 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

great ad, bro... I want one!
It sounds like something I'm going to need, since one of the reasons for the planer is getting into laminated or segmented bowls...
Got any pictures or such, so I can make one?
mac
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Dust collector Small bites each pass Be sure there are no nails in the board. Not that I'd ever do that, but I've heard of it happening to others :)
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Thanks, Ed...
No DC in this case, (unless it helps to clear chips from inside planer?), the messy tools are outside with a nice desert breeze blowing..
small bites meaning cutting depth, right?
(note to self: check battery in stud finder)
mac
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Without DC, the rollers on some planers can press the shavings into the wood, causing dents. Also, planers create very large amounts of shavings, so you may find a snow shovel useful...
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wrote:

Without a DC, at least use a shop vac, preferably with a drop box, to pull out the shavings. And there will be a LOT of shavings on most wood. We did a bunch of redwood for one of my son's projects last month, and got perhaps 5 garbage bags of shavings, which now mulch under the roses in the back yard.
These are supposed to be replaceable, two-sided blades, and they are. But I've taken to honing them with 600 grit wet/dry, wrapped around a block of maple, and reinstalling them. Works pretty well. I've been cycling 3 sets of blades on mine for 6 or 7 years, working mostly in oak and maple.
It's a good machine, but it will have a problem if it runs into a temporarily stupid operator. Then you have to wait three days for the $3 part to get FedExed in from Ridgid Central. Could be more of a problem if you've run away to rural Mexico... ;-)
I've used the similar Delta a lot, and certainly wouldn't trade my Ridgid for one. Money well spent.
Enjoy yours, Mac!
Patriarch
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wrote:

It sounds like I need to run a DC hose outside... sort of an interesting logistical problem in the world of durawall houses and scorpions.. *g*

The exact reason for this thread... IMO, it's better to ask a stupid question then make a mistake because you were too stupid to ask...

Yep.. unless they send it by mail, which ridgid won't, I have stuff like that sent to someone in the states and then brought or mailed down...

It seems like a real nice machine.... I was trying to get the Dewalt with 3 blades on a lot of recommendations here, but the ridgid was rated really high, less bucks and it's a lot easier to get HD stuff here than Delta or Dewalt... (it's a bitch getting jet parts for the lathes)

Thanks.. I feel a lot better already and trying to figure out which project for the wife is next.. lol
mac
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mac davis wrote:
> It sounds like I need to run a DC hose outside... sort of an interesting > logistical problem in the world of durawall houses and scorpions.. *g*
I operate my planer outside, no DC necessary; however, a broom, shovel, and a couple of plastic garbage cans are helpful, no, make that mandatory.
Lew
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Thanks.. sort of why I asked, because the planer doesn't have much of a manual, but suggested something like that to keep rollers clean..
Seemed like they were saying that it helps the rollers either during or after use, couldn't really be sure..
Closest Home Depot is over 3 hours away and involves a border crossing that isn't tool friendly, so I want try to prevent as many 'operator errors" as I can...
mac
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"> Just got a Ridgid planer.. pretty basic and looks a bit like the pictures of a

<<snip>>
<<snip>>
Now wouldn't THAT be a sight???
....10 pounds, 24" long and he's already building his own crib and changing table. Wonder if he'll use poly of BLO for the finish...

No clue as to if the Ridgid has any "special" tips, but for planers in general...
1) Cut stock a few inches long...there is no such thing as totally snip free planing.
2) If possible, run boards end to end thru the machine..this will go a long way to giving you snipe free planing.
3) Watch the grain direction. If you get little chips that pull out of the face as you plane, flip the board end for end and run it thru that way...sometimes it just moves the chipping to the other direction, but often it'll work. If not, take lighter cuts and lightly mist with plain water before each cut. read again LIGHTLY MIST...you do NOT want a wet board, just a slightly damp surface.
4) When starting the board, slightly lift the out board end until the starting end is under the outfeed roller...then again, lightly lift the end just as it's coming thru. This can help reduce the amount of snipe on the start and end of the board.
5) NEVER try to plane a short board. I never try to plane a board shorter the half again what the book says is the minimum....my delta book says 12" so I never go under 18" long. I go to the drum sander under that. Same thing with the thickness...I never go under 3/8". Am I being a chicken about it? Yes, and I don't care...I've had my share on cuts and bruises over the years from things that were avoidable, I see no reason to open myself up to more now that I've finally gotten a little smarter.
Are there other things to know??? Oh god, yes...and I'm sure that there are others out there that'll helpp fill in the blanks.
Luck
Mike
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wrote:

hmm... good idea... the manual says to cut the "depressed ends" off.... sort of makes you change all your plans & drawings if you have to do that!

AHA! It says "with the grain" in several places... I sort of figured end to end, but nice to be sure...

Cool... might also fit in with "with the grain"..

I can see that I'll be trying that with some scraps... and from the SIDE... *g*

thanks, Mike..
mac
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