New Inexpensive Dovetail Jig

I just received a new dovetail jig I ordered at a recent show. It is called a ChestMate and appears to be manufactured by a company called Prazi USA.
It worked great at the show. Don't know how it is going to work for me as I have not tried it yet. It looks incredible simple and appears to have a short learning curve. It's possible to cut dovetails of ANY length with ANY spacing you want. It does not do half-blind.
I think it is just being introduced and wonder if anyone in this group has tried it yet and any problems that might have been encoutnered.
I think the price was around $125.00. It's made of cast aluminum and like almost everything else is made in China.
Joe
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I just got home from work making American parts on an American made milling machine. You'd be surprised how much is made in the US.

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I could be missing something but it looks like it only cuts two tails and one pin before you have to re-set it for the next set.
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<snip>

Correction. The brochure isn't very clear but it appears that you can cut *one* tail *or* pin at a time and there's apparently a separate setup just for the cleanout. Sorry 'bout that. I'm going to stick with the traditional style although, the Stots Template Master (http://www.stots.com/ ) for $39 looks interesting. You use the master template to make your own jigs for HB and through doevetails out of MDF or ply. I think I'll start a thread and ask about it.
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wrote:

As I said I have not used it yet but a perusal of the brief manual seems to indicate that one lays out the spacing on the piece one is dovetailing and then transfers that spacing to a series of kerfs made on a guide boad which only has to be a few inches wide by the lenth of the piece you are DTailing. The kerfs are then cut on a table or RA saw and they serve as a guide for the DT device. The kerfed guide is clamped on to the piece and the device guide drops into each kerfed slot. In other words, you drop the guide into the kerf, make you DT cut and slide the device into the next kerf. It really seems quite simple and easier than having to make a template for each DT operation or go through all the fiddling necessary with Leigh and other devices. I guess you sort of have to do that here but what can be easier than cutting kerfs in a piece of MDF or scrap board to match the dovetails you wish to make? Sound easy. I will report on it when I actually cut some DTs.
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Looks that way. Should be able to make a set of dovetails in under a half day. Getting them to line up might be a trick.

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Another good choice, one I own and use, is the Katie Jig. It is very versatile, decently priced and expandable. You can see it at www.katiejig.com. Also American made.
Michel www.woodstoneproductions.com Wood Portal
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