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On 1/17/13 11:57 AM, Leon wrote:

That band saw...... I hate you.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 1/17/2013 3:02 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Whuuuuuuut? ;~)
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Noticed the saw tracks on the sheet plywood to the right of that picture. I'm assuming they're from your track saw. You get quite a bit of use from that don't you? Makes me ask, do you ever miss cutting sheet goods on the table saw?
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On 1/17/2013 9:45 PM, Dave wrote:

Actually the saw tracks are hanging vertically just to the left of the Laguna band saw. Drive by.... ;~)
The kerf slots you see on the plywood table are from the track saw. Most of those were made when cutting plastic laminate on my last job. But to answer your question, I do not miss cutting full sheets of plywood on my TS. I did that for about 25 years and wish I'd had this alternative 24 years ago. Keep in mind that the track saw could replace the TS if quality of cut was the only factor. I do still cut plenty of plywood on my TS, hardly a piece does not get cut on the TS, the track saw simply makes large pieces into smaller and easier to manage pieces for the TS.
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I ask these questions in relation to my wheelchair. I can sit and feed sheet plywood through the tablesaw, but I can't move and run a track saw through plywood at the same time. I wish it was otherwise.
Two years ago, I bought a TS55 to see if there was some way I could use it, but ended up exchanging it for an hl850e planer.
The only tracksaw method I can think of using is one of the self feeding types. The Mafell PSS 3100e is an example. And, despite the horrific cost of approximately $3000, it's something I'd seriously consider.
http://www.core77.com/blog/tools/from_the_holy_cow_department_a_self-propelled_track_saw_24165.asp
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On 1/18/2013 12:12 AM, Dave wrote:

I never tried to use a planer to cut boards Dave. How is that work'n out fer yuh G,D,& R.
I know, I know. I saw low hanging fruit. LOL

http://www.core77.com/blog/tools/from_the_holy_cow_department_a_self-propelled_track_saw_24165.asp
Yeah! I have seen that saw, very cool!
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Leon wrote:

Nor have I. But I did see someone try to do so with a joiner.
It was in a junior high shop class around 1946. When the teacher saw the kid trying to cut through the board with the joiner he grabbed the kid, bent him over a table and broke the board with the kid's butt. As I said, it was 1946 and things were different corporal punishment-wise then. And no, I wasn't the kid.
--

dadiOH
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On 1/18/2013 2:10 PM, dadiOH wrote:

The good old days, however It was 1969 for me. Use the jointer ONLY to straighten or flatten a board, NEVER to clean up a cut or make the board a specific thickness or width. Our shop teacher took base ball bats and cut them long ways a few times to product 3~4 paddles.
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Been years since I've thought about those 'good old days'. For throwing a snowball, I was hit three times on the palm of my hand with a leather strap.
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Worked out pretty good ~ after I disposed of the three feet pile of shavings.
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