New Fine Woodworking magazin almost made me ill

Page 5 of 5  


Such beasties are fairly inexpensive.
It's also _easy_ to home-brew one. all you need is: a) a 'trickle charger' for 12V batteries b) nominal 12V of rechargeable batteries (e.g. motorcycle-type gel-cell) c) a 12V light (automotive headlight, cigarette-lighter spotlight, even a camping fluorescent lantern, etc.) d) a relay across the 120V, that turns on the 12V lamp, when the power goes off.
Work at it, and you can spend $50 for the parts. Shop the surplus world, and you can probably do it for significantly under $20.
I think 'commercial' units are in the $100 ballpark.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Bonomi responds:

Some are under $30. I doubt I'd want to try making one for that!
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree totally. That's too cheap _not_ to buy!
I havn't had occasion to price such stuff for years -- memory said circa $60, circa 10 years ago. Was 'guessing' on current market. Glad to see I was wrong on the high side. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) writes:

<http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/productdetail.jsp?xi=xi&Itemid11571250&ccitem=>
USD 52 for 90 minutes.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) writes:

Emergency lights are as cheap as $36 at Home Depot with several more models at $45. An exit sign with emergency lighting jacks the price to $135.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's the kind of environment where I'd make sure I had some battery-backed emergency lighting. <wry grin>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Bonomi responds:

Yes. Today, I probably would. But back then, I never even thought about such a thing. That shop was a lot of fun, large (19' x 63'), and I spent over $1500 on lights, wiring and paint, plus a couple, three weeks getting it ready for tools. A lot of money for stuff that has to be left behind. The lease was a good one, the rent was low, the landlord helpful, and heat was free, so it was near ideal (except for a 7' 4" ceiling) at the time. But a battery pack of emergency lights would have made it handier. Who woulda thunk, though, that the blinking power company would be the one that created the problem.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) writes:

Can't speak to the OP, but if I were doing it with a single switch, that switch would energize a set of contactors (read: relay), one to a circuit. Turn off the switch (could even be 12v) and the contactors open - voila, no power to tools.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Lurndal responds:

Yeah, well...I guess it can be done that way, but it does seem like a peepot full of extra work for no particular reason I can see. For a basement shop where toddlers and teenagers had room to roam, it might make sense, but in my shop, I shut off the machines, slap the light switches down and cross the yard to the house.
I don't see a need for a single switch, because even with the toddlers and teens, it's easy to beat.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, I've just got one 20 amp circuit going from the garage out to the shop. I don't yet have any big tools other than my 17amp PSI dust collector, and I'll tell you that it dims the lights right down on startup.
Overall I agree with you, but the number of outlets in a shop is irrelevant, what matters is how much you're drawing, and 45 outlets just sitting there don't tend to draw much ;) I just use two tools at a time. My contractor's saw, in thick stock, with the DC, can trip the breaker, but that situation is rare (twice in 5 years?).
My plan is to run a 220V circuit out there to a subpanel with the 20A circuit, and have that panel's main switch shut everything down. Then I'll move the DC to 220 and put the contractor's saw out to pasture for a cabinet saw. I REALLY like having the whole shop on one switch though.
-Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike responds:

Yeah, well, that's either 8 or 9 circuits, with two extending to a few outdoor outlets that might get used for whatever while I'm working inside. I seldom have more than 3 outlets occupied and drawing at a time, unless a friend is over, but I also run studio strobes and hot lights off the same outlets, so need every one--sometimes.
It would take a bank of switches to shut it all off, I'm afraid.

Makes sense.

Well, I prefer having the lights on separate channels, as it were, and I've got an electric furnace on its own 60 amp breaker, if I ever get to the point of hooking up the blinking thermostat.
But why is having a single shut-off important to you?
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you really want the best of both worlds ...
You can have your electrician install a line-powered contactor in series with your shop sub-panel. The coil (110 VAC) is connected to your light switches (and optionally a key-lock switch) and the power to the sub-panel goes through the contactor. Thus, whenever you turn the lights out, the power goes off to all the tools. Bad side ... when you turn the lights back on, the tools could start again (if you left them in the "on" position).
For an improved version, wire up a start/stop switch to the array, so that in order to pull the contactor in, you need press the "Start" button (a normally open switch). Use an auxiliary contact ( a low current switch actuated by the armature) in parallel with the "Start" switch, and it will hold itself in (the Start and Stop buttons are momentary).
To shut the contactor off, the "Stop" button (normally closed) is wired in series with the contactor coil. When you press "Stop", it breaks the current path to the coil, the armature opens, and the auxiliary contact is no longer keeping the circuit energized.
PLUS ... should the power drop out, none of the machinery will automatically restart until you press the "Start" button again.
Going yet further, you could wire a series of emergency stop buttons around the shop ... push any button, and all power tools quit. You could also shut the lights off ... but that's not a "normal" emergency reaction, so I'm not recommending it.
If you can't follow these instructions, you'd better consult with an electrician.
HTH
Rick
All the ( ... ) indicate I've been writing WAY too much code lately. Time to smell the sawdust!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good question. I've got two young children and sometimes have to evacuate the shop in a hurry to rescue SWMBO. I can just pull off the safety goggles and apron, and hit a switch on the way out the door. This makes sure my A/C, heater, fans, and radio all go off. That makes it a lot easier to come and go and not spend time prepping my workspace. Sometimes I leave the DC on, but it's not dangerous when it starts up.
-Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most main breakers are not engineered for regular on/off duty. You can get switches that are designed for it and I would recommend looking into one of those if you decide to proceed this way.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd regard _two_ circuits as the absolute minimum for a *safe* shop. One for lights (only), and 'everything else' on the other one. OR, as available, split the 'everything else' up on multiple breakers.
I entirely agree about the 'desirability' and 'convenience' of a "master kill" switch; *BUT* I don't want it to take out the lighting -- I need to be able to *see* what those moving 'sharp bits' are doing, _at_least_ until they *stop* moving.
_Two_ switches -- the 'master kill', and the lights, is not an excessive burden. :)
BTW, this is a good reason to _not_ run the "lighting" circuit through a sub-panel, when you use a sub-panel for the shop. Pull the extra pair of wires. Then you can lock out the entire panel, without losing the lights. And, in that horror-of-horrors situation where you manage to overload the sub-panel feed, without overloading any -single- circuit, you'll *still* have the lights.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.