New Craftsman table saw

For all those who questioned the new Craftsman table saws, I just got back from Clearwater, where I attended the press conference, ran a bit of plywood through the saw, and was somewhat surprised at the overall quality of the top of the line model.
Basically, this new saw has cast iron trunnions that are hung from the cabinet and connected by steel rods. The trunnions are smaller than those on the Unisaw, but are far more massive than ANY other contractor's saw trunnions.
The top of the line model does have the 30" Biesemeyer commercial fence. I forgot my tape measure, but it was identical to the one I used to have on a Unisaw, and that was the commercial model.
Two cast iron wings. T slot. Small MDF/melamine right side table. Sheet metal back support. Much better fence--set once, after that, it takes one screw (with built on handle) to remove and reinstall--it reinstalls without further need for set-up.
Enjoy. Two things: adjustment handles are still small, though number of turns from bottom to top of blade height is reduced (I forget the exact number); the Leitz "variable pitch" blade actually has 4 different sized gullets that help to reduce blade whine (considerably).
The one I used couldn't pass the nickel test, but that was because it was mounted on a mobile stand which rested on a carpeted floor, so there was virtually no chance.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What's the price?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Balderstone asks:

Whoops. Figured that had been covered already. $949.95 in marketing speak. $950 in real life.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ouch... It better be a damned good saw.
I was at Sears early today based on their flyer... a pressure washer marked down $100 (putting it back in the reality zone), and I had a $20 off coupon.
Got there and a saw a toy. Left without it.
djb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 19:04:44 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

I looked on the Sears site and saw two cabinet style saws, one for about $950 abd one for over $1200. From the pics, it appeared they were both right tilt, but I couldn't be sure. Is the lower priced one the one you reviewed?
-Doug
--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Winterburn asks:

Neither. Those are Sears' industrial style saws. I don't know--decided to check. The $950 one shown, 00922124000, is it. It is a left tilt, by the way. All 3 of the new saws are left tilt. Sears is NOT calling these cabinet saws, but "cabinet style." Dunno why, since the turnnions mount to the cabinet, instead of the table, but...the PR release and the catalog and on-line copy make absolutely NOTHING of the cast iron trunnions, so it's hard to figure what is important at the time (they were heavily emphasized and passed around at the press conference).
I think it is possible to get a big break through the Craftsman Club, and there may be introductory store sales. I'm looking at a catalog price of $849.99, but the announced price at the press conference was $949.99. All the saws were more expensive than the catalog shows. I don't know if this catalog is in general release...my stuff is in a mess. We're moving Tuesday and I've been out of town since Tuesday.
But it's a good saw, much better than any similarly priced Craftsman saw that I've ever seen before (taking into consideration inflation). Sears believes it is a significant step up. They also are starting to state a closer to true HP level, while retaining the "maximum developed" HP as a secondary figure, instead of primary. Maybe someday, someone will replace all those 6-1/2 HP vacs out there, or the 3-1/4 HP routers.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like it may be a winner for them. If they put it on sale, it could be a good buy. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What is the nickel test?
-- KB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
K. B. asks:

Stand a nickel on edge and start the saw. If the nickel remains standing, the saw is well balanced and low on vibration.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just bought the new O922124N saw this weekend. With my Craftsman club and an additonal "Today Only" discount I got almost 20% off, putting my total at $769. I will receive the saw next Friday so I'll keep you posted! MrMortise
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Barry responds:

Try it with a nickel first. That 'pop' is the set in the belt from shutting down and leaving it in one spot (unavoidable). Many newer designs use multi-groove belts that are very thin and soft, aligned on nicely machined pulleys. This helps reduce vibration a lot. Powermatic has gone to a two belt system on their model 66 to help avoid the start-up set in the belts--more flexible belts are used.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14 Jun 2004 00:20:01 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I know. <G>
In fact, the 650 uses 2 belts, on nicely machined pulleys. I think a softer belt would help. I haven't bothered to change the belts, as the pop really dosen't bother me.
I usually do my final alignment of the cut line after the machine is running. If I'm using a stop, on a miter gauge or sled, the pop really dosen't come into play.
Once it's running, a dime will stand on edge all day long, which is better than a nickel.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message

I just came from Sears and these new saws really do look pretty nice. The dust collection system looks like it will really work on all three models and the $950 one has a real Made-in-USA Biesemeyer fence on it. Unlike all the other contractors saws which are made in Taiwan, these new Crafstman saws are made in China including the motors. The $950 saw has a 1 HP and the contractors version has a 1.5 HP motor. I guess there is a new kid in town
Scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I had some tile to kill, and looked at these the other day.
As a former owner of a sears contractor saw. I thought.... Gee, Crapsman has come a long way. The fence was lightyears ahead of the ones thay had a dozen years ago. I noticed that they had set screws on the miter bar for snugging things up. There was an Aux miter fence which was a nice touch. The hand wheels were a bit small and stiff though.
In short, It ain't a cabinet saw, but neither is the price. This unit did not appear to suck. If I were in the market for a hybrid (cab/contractor saw) for 110V I think I would have to look closely at how it stacked up against the Jet and DeWalt hybrids.
-Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.