New Clifton Chip Breaker - Old Stanley Screw Won't Fit


... and Clifton, unlike Hock and Lie Nielsen does not include the courtesy screw with its $30 chip breaker. The old screw is too big, seems like I will strip the threads on the screw or the new chip breaker if I force it. I tried the chip breaker screw from another Stanley plane and ... same problem. I can't find anything about this problem amid numerous comments praising the Clifton chip breaker. Any ideas? The only chipbreaker screw I've been able to find for sale on its own is a part sold by Highland Hardware for repairing "bench planes." I suspect this is the same as the Stanley screws I've got already. Am I missing something?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I got lucky and solve my own problem. Thanks to the good folks at Tools for Working Wood (check them out at http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com ) this problem has been identified by one distributor of the Clifton chip breaker along with their $.99 solution!
Some companies are simply in another league when it comes to serving their customers. Tools for Working Wood is one of them. Clifton will hopefully realize that, for failing to include a critical $.99 part, one potential customer for their planes spent hours trying to puzzle out why a product their distributor's catalog told me "will fit all makes of metal bench planes including Stanley, Record, and Footprint" requires a screw that is not supplied, not mentioned in the product's "instructions," and incompatible with the screw that will be found on the planes that many purchasers of the Clifton chip breaker will be trying to upgrade. Dumb.
By the way, the chip breaker/cap iron is widely praised and appears to be a wonderful product. I am still looking forward to upgrading my vintage 1912-1918 Type 11 Stanley jack plane, just not this weekend.
Here is the link to Tools for Working Wood:
http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code -SS-635.XX&Category_CodeL
2 Piece "Stay-Set" Cap Iron for Bailey Style Planes Click on image to enlarge Quantity in Basket: none Code: EE-SS-635.XX See below for stock info A basic method for making a good hand plane work even better is to use a thicker blade and cap iron. These cap irons by Clifton are based on the old Record "Stay-Set" cap iron design. The back of the cap iron screws to the blade like a regular cap iron (screw not included), but the front piece is a heavy chunk of steel that hooks on the back and really adds a mass of metal to the blade. The end result is like the heavy cap irons that are found on infill planes. When you need to hone the blade, you just lift off the front part, sharpen it and replace it with no loss of adjustment and no fiddling around for a screwdriver. When used on a new, Stanley-type plane, the cap iron can make a dramatic difference. All of our Clifton bench planes come already fitted with a premium Clifton blade and this cap iron. Made in England. Note: Does not fit pre-1970's Stanley Cap-iron screws. Works fine with all newer American, Indian, and English made Stanley, Record, and Anant planes. Modern cap iron screws are available below.
` end
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ted Franklin wrote:

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code -SS-635.XX&Category_CodeL
I think they are all out to get you. From what I can tell, the Clifton chip breaker uses standard threading and you could've found your solution at the hardware store for considerably less than $0.99.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All of the breakers came with the Clifton screw. They will fit Bailey's as well as Bedrocks. Clifton must have changed their marketing policies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hopefully, Clifton will include screws in the future, but if not, perhaps the next person who runs into this problem will google up this thread and find the names of at least two sources for the part.Although the solution isn't as simple as a trip to the hardware store (unless Highland Hardware, or some other woodworking specialist who stocks plane parts, happens to be in your neighborhood!), it's easy enough to order the part since what's needed is a current (not historic) Stanley part.
Now I'm really looking forward to trying out the new iron!
"Lowell Holmes" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.