New Bandsaw: What blades?


I just bought a Powermatic 14" w/riser. Are there 3 or 4 must have blades that I should start with? The saw will be use for general woodworking, maybe some minor resawing. I have ordered Duginske's book. Never used a bandsaw before. Thanks for any input.
Dave
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very_dirty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

Google this group for Iturra and get their catalog. It's a frigging book, and it's free. They have "must haves" for bandsaws.
As for blades, Many people like Timberwolf and Woodslicer. http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/ http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/ Timberwolf has many names depending on the retailer. for example: http://www.woodcraftssupplies.com/pswoodblade.html
Iturra likes Lenox blades. Read his catalog for some of the debate.
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On 18 Jan 2006 15:27:18 GMT, Bruce Barnett
Strongly agree, stay away from Timberwolf.

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I keep seeing the reference to Iturra. Can someone come up with a url?? I did a search and got nada..
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 20:03:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

I don;t think there is one (or if there is it's not worth knowing). The company is (was?) infamously web-phobic.
It's also impractical to order their products from outside the USA 8-(
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Iturra Designs. No web page - but their phone number is 888-722-7078.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 20:03:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:
No website email: snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net or toll-free 888-72207078. You will not regret for the over 200 pages free catalog.

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correction:
No website email: snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net or toll-free 888-722-7078. You will not regret for the over 200 pages free catalog.

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2 must-haves IMHO. Something for resawing (1/2 or 3/4" 3tpi), and something for curves (1/4" 10tpi). This will do 90% of what you want reasonably well.
-Steve

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You probably want three blades. 1/2" resaw, a 1/4" or 3/8" for general purpose cutting, 1/8" for intricate curves.
I have done gentle curves with my re-saw blade and I've re-sawn small pieces with my 1/4" gp blade when I only had a single cut and was too lazy to change the blades.
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The book will tell you everything you need to know.

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On 18 Jan 2006 07:01:11 -0800, very_dirty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Most folks that do general work normally have a 3/8" blade on most.... usually 8 or 10 teeth per inch (TPI)
For resawing, usually 5/8 or 3/4", 3 or 4 TPI... most of these blades have little or no tooth set...
I do mostly lathe work with a lot of circle cutting but also cutting thick stock that's usually green... I like a 1/2" 4 TPI blade for that...
For tight turns and stuff, you probably would use a 1/4'blade with a lot of teeth, but I've never had that small of blade so I can't tell ya...
Also, your saw should have a guide to blades/uses inside the blade cover door... if not, check out the manual..
mac
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On 18 Jan 2006 07:01:11 -0800, very_dirty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's a good start. Add a set of Coolblocks to the order.
Maybe a couple of Allen keys too. Your saw probably needs a couple of Allens for adjusting the guides. It's worth having spares of these and keeping the with the machine, not having to get the toolbox. You might also find that one or more of the lower guide adjustments need a ball-ended or cut-down Allen to fit in place.
You need blades between 3/8" and 1/4" wide. You can probably put a 3/8" blade in there and leave it for almost everything, but you want to have a few more on hand for specials. 3/8" will cut most gentle curves. 1/4" blades cut curves fine - less than this and you're probably in scrollsaw territory,
Don't go below 1/4" until you're sure the guides can handle it. To support this narrow blade with the rear guide it might be running with teeth further back than usual. Coolblocks can deal with this, but it chews them up, so swap them over end-for-end when using such narrow blades. 3/16" should work, 1/8" can be fiddly on some machines.
A 14" machine should run a 1/2" blade. More than this is unlikely. 5/8" might well appear to be working, but you have to ask if it's actually any better than a 1/2" with the same teeth. Wider isn't better, if it's beyond the machine's capabilities.
3/4" is right out, unless you're unusually lucky. The makers might claim it works, you might be able to mount it on the wheels, but getting it to track right is hard enough - then you still have the problem that it's probably better to use a 1/2" with the same teeth and decent tension than it is to be all macho with a huge blade that's flopping around everywhere.
Improved springs (Iturra?) can improve some machines where there's not much length allowed for the spring. Never tighten the spring down until it bottoms out - that tends to break blades if there's a catch.
So in general, use 3/8" blades and set them up right. It works better overall than trying to use a wider blade and failing.
Tooth profiles are important and Duginske is a good guide. You really need to try a few and see what best suits the work you're doing. Make notes! Hang a blade table up on your blade rack and know what you have there. See what works for you, what doesn't, and do some more shopping next time on that basis.
General use - 3/8" 6tpi skip-tooth Scrolls - 1/4" 14tpi standard tooth Scrolls in thicker material - 1/4" 10 tpi standard tooth - better chip clearance Lumbermilling - 1/2" 3 tpi hook or hook-skip (if you have a low powered motor) Joinery - 1/2" 14tpi standard tooth. This will give a lovely accurate square crosscut, but it won't cut quickly owing to chip clearance.
Resawing depends on what you mean by it. Making thick dry boards into two boards ready for thickness planing should use your big 3tpi blade. Resawing to bookmatch fine cabinetry needs to leave a better finish behind, so use 10 or maybe 14 tpi and standard teeth, not hook. This will always be a slow cut, because of the chips. There's also a resaw technique for small machines using a narow blade and allowing it to be pushed backwards (rather than bowing sideways).
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"Andy Dingley" wrote in message

... and, strictly for the OP's benefit, a 3/8", 3 tpi, skip blade will do a commendable job of resawing on a well setup 14" bandsaw.
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wrote:

Even though it has roller guides?
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Mike
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Michael Gresham wrote:

catch, Michael.
Dave
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 03:01:16 GMT, "Michael Gresham"

On a typical 14" saw, then yes.
Mine (Axminster 350) went through the standard plastic blocks, Coolblocks, then added their "upgrade" bearing set. I've now gone back to the Coolblocks (posts passim).
If you have _good_ bearings, then stick with them. But the bearings on low-end bandsaws aren't as good, especially with narrow blades.
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If you use the small 1/8" blades you will need to swap out the bearing guides with something like cool blocks.
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Thanks for all the great input. I have some direction now. Found Iturra's 888 number and will get the catalog.
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