New 230V outlets..switched?

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How is that different or better than just plugging the saw into an extension cord?
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Leon wrote:

Extension cords are not to be used "in place of fixed wiring"- so unless it's a portable saw temporarily set up, it's a code violation. Using a home made extension cord to connect the 220V receptacle by the TS to the receptacle on the wall would also be a violation.
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My Cabinet saw is portable and moved every time I use it.
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That's very dangerous... but if you must use a switch, use a good pull-arm knife switch type in a box, not just some cheap crap wall switch. Crap breaks... you want a positive break in the circuit, not a toggle spring waiting to zap you!! And wire the lights on another breaker!
I put an outlet over my saw, its cheap and with my poor memory, saves body parts...
The worst feeling you can have is finding current in a machine you were sure was dead!! Oops is not a good word when you are working...
PS There has been a ton of electrical questions here, for the record - its 120/240 volts... all those 110, 115, 117, 220, 230 references are out of date.
also, 208 refers to 3 phase industrial power, home current is single phase, center tapped 240. (120+120)
Bob IBEW
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I have what you want right here on the table next to my computer. It's a "Square D Pull-Out Disconnect Switch". The one that I have is 30 amp fusible model FP221R, but you can get them without fuses.
There's a small bar with a pull tab on it inside an electrical box. Put the bar in one way and there's no electrical contact. Put it in the other way and you're good to go. Put the bar in your pocket and nobody can turn it on while you're working... You can also lock the box.
This is usually used as an outdoor air conditioning disconnect. I plan to use this one on a jointer with a five horse motor on it ( 240V@27A ).
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).

That is the correct answer! Combines the comvenience of a switch with the safety of true current interruption! Switches can fail in such a way that they pass current unexpectedly, but this unit is fail safe. I would still remove the bar when changing blades. I think we humans need a strong visual key (like the plug laying on the floor, or the bar sitting on the work surface) to reinforce our safety habits over the many hours in the company of tools that can hurt us. All it takes is one mistake...
Tom M.
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"Benson" writes:

NO, not in my shop.
A plug and receptacle provides a visual disconnect means which a wall switch does not unless you equip it with a padlock fitting and padlock.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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