New 230V outlets..switched?

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1. As long as I'm having an electrician wire 230V outlets, wouldn't it be desireable to have them switched, so I could change blades, etc., without unplugging the equipment?
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I guess, if you don't want to just throw the circuit breaker. You can if you want to, just make sure that the switch being used disconnects BOTH hot leads and not just one and that it can handle the current load of the circuit as well.
Frank
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Most circuit breakers are not designed for high duty-cycle operation. Turn a circuit breaker on and off all the time like it was a switch and you'll probably wear it out after not too long.
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wrote:

Actually I worked at a company that used circuit breakers to turn off the shop lights and the compressors. Never recall a breaker failing in the 10 years that I worked there.
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Those are usually "SWD" switching duty circuit breakers. Unless they are listed for switching duty, they are not supposed to be used as such.
wrote:

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That very well may have been as there were no other switches.
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In this application the breaker will not be switching any current so its life should not be impacted. Also, breakers of 30 amps and less don't seem to be impacted when used to interrupt current. Switching larger breakers when carrying large currents can impact their life in my experience.
My personal preference when working on tools that need to be turned off for service is to place the plug on the tool where I can see it before and while my hand is at risk. Maybe I'm paranoid but unplugging it is far more certain than remembering to turn a switch or breaker off.
RB
Roy Smith wrote:

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I like the plug in my pocket when I am setting up too ;-)
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I don't believe it's the current interruption that causes the wear, it's just the mechanical movement of the internal parts. Circuit breakers (unlike normal switches) are designed to interrupt currents many (like 100's) times their rated capacity. They're also designed to trip even if the external handle is mechanically held in the "ON" position. The design tradeoffs required to meet those requirements usually involve some kind of spring-loaded mechanism, which leads to a relatively high mechanical wear each time the machanism is cycled.
If the contactors can handle interrupting a 1000 A overload, the arcing caused by interrupting a 20 A load isn't going to be significant.

There's no doubt that that's the safest way to do it.
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This is probably a silly response, but when I'm sticking my hand where it could easily be turned into ground hamburger or sliced ham, I think I'd have a happier feeling about it seeing a cable unplugged vs. a switch that's up, or was it down, or...you get the idea :)
Mike

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If you don't trust the switch on the tool, why would you trust the switch on the wall?
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Benson wrote:

Well, I think it is more a question of how do you know the device has no juice? Some people prefer the unplug method because you can visually check...
There was a recent question here on having a lighted switch that had two lights, one for when the switch was on and another of a different color for when it was off (that way you don't accidentally fry/butcher yourself if the light bulb for "on" went out). I have also seen in a book a tip about tying a short piece of rope/cord between the blade change tool and the plug from the machine. That way you cannot possibly use the tool unless you first unplug the machine.
Anyway, it's all about personalities I think. For me the unlpug method works, but other people might want another way to assure the power's off.
--
gabriel

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All of our 220v tools are just wired directly to the circuit with wire nuts, no plugs/outlets anywhere. Wasnt my decision, doesnt make me particularly happy. Meant that when the switch on the drum sander melted a spade lug, I had to go find the stupid breaker just to safely open it >:O
On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 21:08:09 +0000, gabriel wrote:

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You can; just make sure it is a double pole switch rated for the amperage involved.
I put one on my DC to avoid having to get back there. Like all the other replies you got, I like to unplug my TS. You can't be too careful.
(breakers should not be used as switches unless they are designed for that application, which is unlikely.)
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When I change a blade, I _really_ want to see that cable and plug laying on the top of the tool. Then I know for sure it is safe to work on the blade.
Have your electrician place the new 230 outlet where it is real easy to get at.
DexAZ

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I had my planer hardwired to an approved disconnect switch for a while. I Never got over the uneasiness when working on the knives and not seeing where the end of the cord was. Take the recommendation of putting the outlet in a convenient location and pull the plug.
EJ
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Every 220 in my shop is not a 'plug' in the wall. Instead they are all a short length (14" or so) of flexible 12-3 coming out of the box on the wall. Makes unplugging easy.
It's near impossible for me to reset my planer knives without accidentally hitting the on-switch with my knee. It's just in a bad place so when I set the knife on top, kneel down to test it with the dial gauge, then get up off my knees, my left knee always hits the switch. I've never turned it on but I sure feel better knowing there is no juice present.
jb
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If MY hands were in jeopardy, I'd open the breaker to the 220 leg feeding the outlets. If you current configuration doesn't allow that I believe I change it. Hands are a rather critical appendage! Keeping power off the machines when repairing or adjusting is only common sense to me.
Don Dando

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Would a 2 walks over to the switch be less trouble than bending over and unplugging the tool?

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This is not a good idea. Instead have the 220v outlet on the wall, and then screw another 220v outlet onto the side of your tablesaw. The outlet on your TS has a 220V plug coming out of it to plug into the wall. Then plug your TS into the outlet on the side of your TS.
Aloha, Russell
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