Neophtye Needs Advice for Minor Project

Hi all. I need some logistical and technical advice. I've done some cookbook-style finishing projects, making my way thru a range of canned products, sandpaper grades, and so on. However, I've always had the benefit of a large workspace, and relatively simple items.
Now things have changed. I've got a teeny, tiny apt, and no money. I have a dresser to finish, and no idea how to handle it. I only want to use a stain & coat all-in-one product, a minimum of papers, and get it done with quickly. Since it's a dresser, however (with lots of interior space), and I don't have much room, I'm not sure how to handle it.
Do I do a quick coat on the insides of the drawers one-by-one, do I do the backs, let them dry, then the fronts...? It seems silly, but I'd like to benefit from someone else's experience at this kind of stuff. Please keep in mind that I have very little room right now.
Thx
Mike
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I'm not sure exactly what you are asking. Treat The all in one product is nothing more than poly with stain. So Treat it as such. That said, the windows of the apartment open right? If you are planning on doing the insides of the drawers get a small can of straight, fast drying (or water based) poly for them no use wasting the color on the insides (not to mention future color fast problems [maybe]) The insides can be done as well as the outsides at the same time since the inside never comes in contact with the outside (um duh?) Just use standard logic. Don't coat whatever side goes down, two coats always, and don't shake the brush or you will be redesigning the apt. too.
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You should ask in alt.home-repair, as all you're going to get here are reasons why you shouldn't use a PolyShades type of product. <G>
I'll let everyone else pick it up from here.
Barry
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On Sat, 04 Oct 2003 23:03:11 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

In all honesty, the people who use Polyshades probably turn out somewhat better looking stuff than those who stain and poly in separate steps. Self-stainers have overlap strips, sanded white corners, etc. The Plastic-RBS-in-a-can is safer due to fewer steps.
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wrote:

Not from what I've seen.
Multiple steps give you more opportunities to correct or reverse a mistake before it's set in stone.
I've seen several pieces done by different people with Poly Shades and clone products. They all were truly horrible, this stuff will easily shop lap marks, runs, etc.... The pieces would have looked much better with a simple coat of latex paint. <G>
Barry
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On Sun, 05 Oct 2003 11:35:37 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

You're allowing for expertise and wisdom of experience where none yet exists. I still say that the PS BS is the lesser of the two evils.

That's a GIVEN. Most projects which were stained should have been painted instead, IMNSHO.
But I've still seen worse blotches and lap marks on stained stuff (including my own before I knew better than to use the crap, or I wanted to match something.)
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