Need table saw advice

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:-) Yep, a full 4X8 sheet of 3/4 MDF on a 2X6 frame for outfeed, and a workbench ahead of the saw at the same height. The 52" fence required a LONG table extension that does the rest! I have a 36-650 CS in the middle of all that! :-) Does a great job.
Dave.
Mark Jerde wrote:

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And to me, a router for "edge" jointing seems very logical to use. Methinks even cleaner cuts are possible than with a large, much slower jointer blade. I don't know how many RPMs the jointer runs at, but I'd hazard a guess that it can't safely run as fast as a 1/2" straight bit in a router. Hence, straighter cleaner edges.
--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
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<...rest snipped...>
Actually if my arithmetic is OK the speed at the tip of the cutting edge of a router bit and a jointer blade are in the same ballpark.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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My $0.02, based on observation as a newbie, rather than experience.

While a beginner without a table saw, I often think that folks overemphasize the TS. Sorta like the "if all you have is a hammer..." approach to life. Even router tables are made to look more like a TS than a router. Why should a RT fence be parallel to the edge of the table? The router is not a linear device like a TS - the fence can go at _any_ angle!

This could be done with a router. And a decent router is comparable in cost to a decent dado blade kit for a TS.
I got a bandsaw, based on my needs (mostly boatbuilding based). I can do most things that I can think of with this except cut really wide pieces of wood (like sheets of plywood/MDf/etc). Crosscuts I do with a hand saw.
I also was infuenced by the FWW 1st annual Tools&Shops issue, where Gary Rogowski suggests that your first power tool should be a BS (unless your needs are cutting wide chunks of wood).
It seems to me that a lot of folks could make good use of a BS and RT to do more than a TS could. I can cut thru 6" of wood more easily than with a TS - that would require me to cut, flip over and cut again. The BS is a substitute for a scroll saw, as long as curves aren't too tight. The router will allow plunge cut dadoes and grooves rather than the continuous versions that most TS users get. Much neater than having a groove sticking out the end of a hunk of wood.
If I needed to cut plywood/MDF/etc (in the short term given my _very_ limited budget), I'd probably go for a decent straightedge and circ saw and use the BS for everything once the big sheets are down to size. But that would suit my needs, possibly not many others'.
Anyway, if you need a TS, it's an excellent tool. But I wonder if some folks focus on the TS too much.
Mike
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wrote:

overemphasize
I find it quite useful for ripping wood precisely. The blade doesn't wander like it would on a bandsaw. Ripping at an angle can be hairy on a bandsaw, but on a TS it is no problem because the work stays flat and the blade tilts.
It can also make bigger cross-cuts than I can make with a chop saw.
Perhaps it is just that I have never worked with a really good bandsaw, but I find that cutting with a tablesaw is just more accurate due to the stiffer blade.
-Jack
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I'll take your word on this. It seems that many get good results with a good TS. However, the few bits I've seen done by folks I know are usually no better (often worse) than my BS. However, they are not woodworkers with considerable talent and/or use poor quality or poorly adjusted stuff. It has given me the preconceived notion that a TS makes a really rough cut.

I've ripped a big chunk of quarter sawn oak at an angle and it was very hairy only because I couldn't use the fence. I was cutting to follow the grain and had to follow the curve of the trunk just below the bark.
If cutting with one side straight, it's not so bad, since I rest it against the fence. If long, supporting the free end on edge is a PITA. I could see a TS being better.
I'm not trying to rag the TS, just say that there seems to be such a strong emphasis on the tool at the expense of what might be a better tool for some tasks.
Example - I'm fixing up an old oak dresser and instead of M&T joints at the back, they put a long groove down the vertical bits (stile?) and stuck tenons on the horizontal bits. The tenons were glued into the groove and the glue is now letting go - so gravity takes over. This is an example to me of someone choosing a TS over a morticer or router and creating a sloppy result.
Mike
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wrote:

wander
Smooth as glass actually. My experience is the opposite of yours.

problem
hairy
I'm not saying it is not possible, but big pieces on a tilted table follow the laws of gravity. A table saw will never be able to follow the curve of the trunk (or any curve) though. That is why I'd like to have a bandsaw.

the
tenons
glue is

someone
Sounds like poor design rather than a tool limitation. I cut real tenons on the table saw. It works great. A band saw would work just as well. Neither one of them does very well chopping mortises however...
-Jack
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You can do excellent woodworking without a good cabinet saw, but after you own a good cabinet saw, you wonder _why_ you would want to.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
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I think the problem may be that some people see the BS simply as an overgrown scroll saw. At the wood shows I've gone to, both at the same place, the demos were all novelties done with the tiniest blades possible, showing tight, mazelike curves being cut in a block of wood. Not good advertizing for a BS. They should have shown resawing an 11" hard maple log into boards or something. The Laguna demos were a bit more inspirational, showing basic jointing on the BS, starting with an irregular block of wood, creating the first flat side, then moving on to joint the thing into a dimensional piece of wood. Since the table/blade/fence are all set at 90 degree and 0 degree angles to one another, its not hard to imagine how easy that is to do.
--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
So I installed it on Linux...
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| | I think the problem may be that some people see the BS | simply as an overgrown scroll saw.
That's the pretext under which I bought mine. It wasn't until I'd owned it for a year or so that I figured out you could use the darned thing to cut in a straight line. It was another three years before I got adept enough at using all the guides and tuning all the adjustments to even start to use the thing in the way it's supposed to be used. And now that I feel more comfortable with it, I want a better one. Had I known what I'd be using it for, I'd have sprung for a better model.
| They should have shown resawing an 11" hard maple log into | boards or something.
I saw a guy cutting his own veneer with his bandsaw. He was just happily shaving off 1/16" thicknesses of birdseye maple.
--Jay
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Michael Baglio <mbaglio<NOSPAM> wrote:

I think I've got you beat for 'power density', at least on the 110 side.
In my _kitchen_, I've got *THIRTY* 110 outlets (1 quad for every 3' of counter, plus a duplex for (A) the refrigerator, (b) the freezer, (c) motorized partition to the DR. Only 1 220v though, for the stove. But, we're talking 88 sq ft 'gross', and only about 30 sq ft 'open' after appliances and counters. (I've got ten separate circuits feeding only the kitchen. there's only 8 for the _rest_ of the condo.)

ABSOLUTELY!!!
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Buy used machinery.
UA100
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shoulda known that was comin.......;-)
Bob S.

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I envision Keith under the belly of some rusty monster so often, I bet he gets a tetnus shot every six months to protect himself.
dave
Bob S. wrote:

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I envision Keith under the belly of some rusty monster so often, I bet he gets a tetanus shot every six months to protect himself.
dave
Bob S. wrote:

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Marc wrote:

IMO, it boils down to different questions: Are you good enough to work around the weakness of the tool? Or will you get angry and blame the tool for your failures?
Look at the 'Desk' project on this site: http://home.cogeco.ca/~akropinski/Gallery.htm It's gorgeous!
Then look at his workshop. He's got a Craftsman table saw. Anybody who says you can't build nice stuff with middle-of-the-road tools is a sad excuse for a woodworker. It's just a matter of how much YOU want to spend on tools ($$$) and how much time/effort YOU want to spend working around the weaknesses of your tools.
Bottom line: The craftsman makes the furniture...the tools are just along for the ride.
--
************************************
Chris Merrill
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Never tell SWMBO that you can build quality stuff with "middle of the road" tools. :)
dave
Chris Merrill wrote:

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Any SWMBO with kids will readily tell you she did.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote: >>Never tell SWMBO that you can build quality stuff with "middle of the

OOohhhhhh
That's Cruel!
Funny too.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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Q. Why did the chicken go to the middle of the road?
A. Because she wanted to lay it on the line.
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