Need repair of table finish

I have an oak kitchen table with a urethane finish. There are several circular bleached zones from moist or/or hot plates. The surface is still smooth but the color change takes away from the attractiveness of the table. Is there some simple treatment that would restore the original finish or is it better to sand it down and refinish the top?
Dick
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: : I have an oak kitchen table with a urethane finish. There are several : circular bleached zones from moist or/or hot plates. The surface is : still smooth but the color change takes away from the attractiveness of : the table. Is there some simple treatment that would restore the : original finish or is it better to sand it down and refinish the top?
You might like to try my web site - Hints & Tips - Removing White Rings From Polished Furniture.
Jeff G
-- Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK Email address is username@ISP username is amgron ISP is clara.co.uk Website www.amgron.clara.net
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If it blush, moisture driven into the finish but not the wood, the aim is to displace the moisture with an oil.
There are commercial blush removers. I believe Formby makes one and you may be able to get it at a home store.
Other methods
Alcohol rubbed over the blush
An oily substance applied and left on the area. Two are petroleum jelly and peanut butter.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Hmmm...this will be interesting to follow. That's typically caused by trapped water vapor and happens with other finishes also. It may slowly reduce in time, but I haven't seen any fix other than stripping and recoating. With shellac, I've been able to scrape just that area and recoat. The same should work for a thin urethane finish. But, if you've built up a thicker film for a gloss, it'll be hard to blend in unless you strip and refinish. Gerry

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Hmmm...this will be interesting to follow. That's typically caused by trapped water vapor and happens with other finishes also. It may slowly reduce in time, but I haven't seen any fix other than stripping and recoating. With shellac, I've been able to scrape just that area and recoat. The same should work for a thin urethane finish. But, if you've built up a thicker film for a gloss, it'll be hard to blend in unless you strip and refinish. Gerry

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