Need recommendations for chainsaw purchase

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I have an older Stihl with a 20" bar. It's a great saw, but 20" is too much bar most of the time, trying to keep it out of the dirt. 18" should be just about right. The MS250 would keep the powerhead around 10 pounds and it will run a 16" or 18" bar.
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Not having much experience with chain saws, does the option exist to remove a longer bar (at one's discretion) and put on a shorter bar and chain?
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Upscale wrote:

Usually. Most saws come with a recommendation for bar length and an acceptable range. So long as you're within the mfgrs range, you should be good.
Depending on the bars, though, it can get expensive. A 16" bar/chain won't break your bank, but a 24" can start to cost.
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Upscale wrote:

Usually. Most saws come with a recommendation for bar length and an acceptable range. So long as you're within the mfgrs range, you should be good.
Depending on the bars, though, it can get expensive. A 16" bar/chain won't break your bank, but a 24" can start to cost.
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Upscale wrote:

As long as the bar will fit the saw, yes. And vice versa within reason (motor capability). My Stihl had a 14" bar but I sometimes run it with a 16" bar for bigger stuff. No doubt, the shorter the bar is the more convenient the saw is.
--

dadiOH
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For the 20" bar, I have 3 chains to fit it, all the time. The chains alone are about $20 each. So adding a different bar length is a $75-100 proposition. Surely, a second bar+chain is cheaper than an additional saw, but two inches in the 14-16-18 range is not significant. Once we go to 20 or 24 (especially 24) the unit becomes bar nose heavy, so setting it down while it's running can get interesting.
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sorry i made a misprint in earlier posting address for chain saw and supplies is www.baileys-online.com darn sticky key board. any hew good prices on stuff, depending on chain style, gauge, pitch etc you can buy chain for a 20" bar for $12. to $14 bucks plus shipping. if your only buying 1 chain probley won't save much do to shipping. ross www.highislandexport.com
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dadiOH wrote:

Yet another factor to consider: the shorter the bar, the lower the likelihood of bending it, when the usual unexpected stuff happens. Shorter bar is easier to keep true also.
And, if you've a 2' stem to cut and a 16" bar, and you go at it from 2 sides ... Good motivation to learn to cut straight and true.
J
J
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Thomas Kendrick wrote:

Intersting to hear you say that. I've never run a 20 for any length of time...the only saw I have any real experience with is my (former) 18. I always felt comfortable with it...that if I started getting much longer it would be more difficult to keep the chain off the ground.
I go snow/winter camping all the time, and I always take the saw to make wood-gathering go more quickly. (The shear volume of wood you need when the nighttime temps are in the singles is kind of shocking.) I'm looking for dry wood, so I'm obviously not felling anything. (Plus it's not always that clear what's dead and what's not in mid-January...)
I had thought about going with a 20 if the price/specs were in line, but you're post kind of confirmed my suspicions. I don't need length...I need control. I may even go with a 16 if I get a good deal on it.
Thanks for your experience.
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wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in news:1153104171.771204.20490@ 75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:

What you need is a good dealer to overcome the 'didn't know thats'. I sure did. Mine sold me a Stihl, a lot like you're describing. I'm really happy with it.
Patriarch
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I have a Husky 350 and previously owned a Stile for 10 years. Both have been great.More important is what you want it to do. Turners rip logs, some people climb trees etc etc. My needs were at least 50 cc, light weight (10.6 plus 18" bar and chain), and a dealer that I liked.
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