Need instructions for routing a table insert

I'm adding a router table insert into my TS extension and need instructions/procedure for how to route the rabet in the table to EXACTLY match the insert. Can anyone point me to such instrtuctions on the web (I've been rather unsuccessful with Google and Jeeves searchs).
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All you need is a rabbetting bit with a bearing on it. I'm assuming you have a template for your insert. If not, I'm not sure how you're planning to rout the hole for the insert accurately in the first place.
If you have to make your own template, just trace the outline of your router insert plate onto some MDF. Cut out most of the waste from the inside of the MDF and sand accurately to the line. You should have a rectangular donut, with the router plate fitting exactly inside it. Now, simply affix the template to your table board with clamps or good double-sided carpet tape. Jig saw out most of the waste, but be sure to leave enough for your rabbett, and think about your router dimensions so that it will fit into and out of the whole easily. Now, using a bearing guided template bit, with the bearing closest to the router, set the depth to whatever you want your rabbett to be, usually a little more than the thickness of your router plate, so you can level it with leveling screws. You could also use a bearing guided rabbetting bit, which actually is probably the better way to go. You just need one where the outer diameter of the bit and the bearing are the same. Then just rout with the bearing on the template and you should end up with a rabbett and insert hole that exactly matches your router plate.
Mike
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Why not just cut a thru hole the exact size of the base - then just put some "inserts" on the sides of the hole to hold the plate up.

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that's a good idea I forgot to mention. you can get just such things from woodhaven
http://www.woodhaven.com/singleproduct/Main/Router+Tables+and+Accessories/St ay-Tru+Plate+Levelers///130/?fromsearch=1
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Exactly the inserts I was talking about - I was looking for them reciently - I ended up just making my own.

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Hi,
    What I did was pretty simple. I have a straight cutting router bit with a bearing on the top. I placed the insert on the table. I had two strips of MDF as long as the table was wide, and place these against the near and far side of the insert and clamped these down.
_______________________________ | | | | .|..............................|... |....strip..........................| | | | | | | Insert | | | | | | .................................... |....strip.........................| |______________________________|
    Next I cut two more bits of MDF to place against the right and left sides of the insert. I made these wide enough to clamp in place without interfering with the router.
    Remove the insert, and temporarily place it on one of the peices of MDF and use this to set depth of cut. Now use the MDF as a pattern running the bearing against it. The diameter of the bit determines the radius at the corners.
Thanks Roger Haar
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Interesting technique, Roger. I guess then if I have an insert which is, say, 12mm thick and a router bit 21mm long, I'd have to select a thickness of MDF strip such that the sum of the insert thickness and MDF thickness ends up being greater than the total length of the bit (so that the bearing follows the strips) in this example, 9mm.

Did you radius the corners of the insert by filing by hand?

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Let me have a shot at this. This method involves making a template directly from your router insert, then using that to cut the hole in your router table.
Measure your insert. Add 8" (or more) to each dimension, then cut two pieces of 1/2" MDF to that size.
Position your insert onto the center of each piece of MDF, then trace the outline of the insert onto one side of each piece (accuracy is not important here).
With the insert outline face-up on both pieces, affix some double sided-tape to one piece of MDF; put some tape around the perimeter and some inside the insert outline (not TOO much...)
Sandwich the two pieces of MDF together. The outline of the insert should be visible on the top piece; this piece will be your template, and the bottom piece will be scrap.
Affix your insert to the center of the top piece of MDF with a good dose of double-sided tape, using the previously-drawn outline to position it. You're now ready to route the template.
Install a 1/4" straight bit and a 1/2" guide bushing in your router (you should use a plunger for this operation).
Place the router on the insert, snug the bushing up to it, then plunge down and route all around the perimeter of the insert. You should "sneak up" to the final depth-of-cut until you break through the top piece of MDF. This piece is now a template for cutting a hole in your router table. Separate the two sheets of MDF and discard the bottom piece.
Decide where you want the hole in your router table, then affix the template to the table top with double-sided tape. Note that the hole in the template is 3/8" larger than the size of the insert.
Install a 1-1/2" bushing in your router (these can be a bit hard to find; Lee-Valley has them, but they're not the Porter-Cable style).
Place the router on the MDF template, snug the bushing up to it, then route down into the table top, using multiple passes until you reach maximum plunge depth (or break through). You may have to finish up the cut with a jigsaw if the table top is too thick.
The hole in the router table should now be 1/4" smaller than the router insert. Finish the job by using a 1/4" rabbet bit to cut the ledge for the insert to sit on. If your router insert has leveling screws, you can cut the rabbet slightly deeper than the thickness of the router plate; otherwise try to get the rabbet depth as close as possible to the thickness of the plate.
You might be able to use a larger bushing in the first step and a smaller one in the second, but I haven't done the math to figure out what sizes to use...
Robert MacKinnon wrote:

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