Need help to hang drywall!!!

Hi all
I am an artist.... in cutting back on the awful costs of canvas, I opted to try doing some painting on drywall sheets ($6.00 allows me two paintings)
10 hours into my first project made me start to question how on earth I could ever mount my painting....
Does anyone have any thoughts on what I could use as a mounting type bracket etc... that would work in a 5/8'' 4x4 drywall sheet? Any help would be most appreciated!
Thanks so much!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tue, Jun 22, 2004, 10:29pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (vijillante) wonders: <snip> Does anyone have any thoughts on what I could use as a mountingtype bracket etc... that would work in a 5/8'' 4x4 drywall sheet? <snip>
Drywall screws.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22 Jun 2004 22:29:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (vijillante) wrote:

heh heh....
drywall screws?
<G>
consider your budget canvas to be very temporary. you *really* should use something better than drywall unless you _want_ the painting to fall apart after a couple of years.
baltic birch plywood is a reasonable choice. it comes in a variety of thicknesses, is fairly inexpensive, is sanded pretty smooth and is quite strong, even the thin sheets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put a screw in each corner and a couple along each side, right into the wall, then hang a "frame" of miter cut casing around it, covering the screws R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If by drywall you mean sheetrock . . . . stunningly bad idea. It's heavy and won't stand up under handling. Consider your 10 hours as sunk costs and start over with something that is more appropriate. I suggest tempered masonite. It is strong, dimentionally stable and has been used frequently as a base for oil paints.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Jun 23, 2004, 2:45pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@houston.rr.nospam.com (Bubba) says: If by drywall you mean sheetrock . . . . stunningly bad idea. <snip> I suggest tempered masonite. <snip>
Apparently either the guy has never heard of Grandma Moses, or he considers that being an "artist", he doesn't want to use something that's already been done.
Myself, I would never presume to tell an "artist" anything. Even though drywall (or sheetrock) would be somewhere at the bottom of any list I made of things to paint paintings on. Hell, if I was going cheap on canvas, if I didn't pick masonite to paint on, I'd probably pick cardboard; it's even cheaper (try free), and will work a fine.
I still remember reading about the "artist" who considered simply signing his name on a toaster made it a "work of art", and therefore worth a multi-hundred dollar asking price. I never heard if any idiot bought it or not.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hanging with drywall screws may initialize the deterioration process of the drywall painting.
The following comes to mind, but of course I have never tried it:
1. Seal the edges of the drywall with epoxy, or equivalent.
2. Build a frame for the painting, keeping in mind the considerable weight of the piece it will hold as you design it. The frame should cover perhaps two inches around the piece's perimeter, to allow sufficient surface for step 3.
3. Use Liquid Nails, or equivalent, around the perimeter of the piece to glue it to the frame.
4. Add several vertical braces, or a firm (but lightweight) backing board, to sandwich the drywall in the frame. Rigidly attach to the frame, and glue to the back of the painting.
5. Allow the glue to fully cure, then hang the painting like any other very heavy art piece.
/rick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd pass on the drywall idea. To fragile for art and will not hold up without significant sealing, stiffing and protection. After that, it will be very heavy.
Dave

----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
Where DO these come from??

Drywall screws, like everyone else.
Bill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (vijillante) wrote in message

Are you looking for a way to hang the drywall on a wall like a picture? If so and would like to remove it easily , use hanging strips. Some people call them french cleats. Basically you take a rip of plywood 3/4" x 4" x the width of the painting and rip it in half on a 45* angle. One piece screws to the wall. The other to the back of the painting, screwed from the painting side into the hanging strip. The piece that screws to the wall is placed bevel up, sharp edge of bevel away from wall. If done correctly you drop the other piece right on the wall strip and it locks tight. Now when you fasten the other strip to the back of your painting you can lift the painting up a little higher than needed and drop the painting down onto the wall strip. If you do it correctly you will have a level painting that can be easily removed. If you do it wrong you will have swollen toes.
mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.