need help estimating weight of blanket chest top

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Hi,
I was going to buy one of those safety closure devices for a blanket chest I plan to build (they prevent the lid from slamming shut). The top will be solid oak, 16" X 48" by 3/4" thick. I need to estimate the wieght so I can get a properly rated safety closure thing. The lid is not built yet, so I can't just hold it and step on a scale :)
Thanks, as always.
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What about lifting up 3 - 48" x 6" boards, and weigh them? It can't be THAT hard, can it?
Mike

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Thu, Nov 9, 2006, 3:14pm snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Mike Mac) doth wonderingly auery: What about lifting up 3 - 48" x 6" boards, and weigh them? It can't be THAT hard, can it?
Apparently it can be that hard. Weighng was my first though too.
I'll be making a chest with a lid a bit shorter, wider, thicker, then his - about 40"x30"x1". I've no idea what the lid will weigh, and don't care. The "soft close" I'll use will be to not drop the lid.
JOAT Want cheap gas? Pull my finger.
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Even that's harder than lifting up & weighing ONE 4' X 6" board & multiplying by 3. (Well, I guess for some people lifting may be easier than multiplying...) :)
--
Contentment makes poor men rich. Discontent makes rich men poor.
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Dry Oak has an SG of 0.92 gr/CC Some simple math will give you an exact weight for your top.
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No, it doesn't.
Specific gravities range from 0.59 to 0.72 (excepting southern live oak).
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 20:58:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

http://www.tesarta.com/www/resources/library/weights.html
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Joe Bemier wrote:

http://www.hoganhardwoods.com/hogan/pages/technical/Technical_01/densitygravity.htm gives 0.52 to 0.59 for red, and 0.6 to 0.68 for white
According to http://ittendojo.org/articles/general-7.htm , "live oak" or "Quercus virginiana", averages 0.88
Chris
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Is that African oak, or European oak?
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Just my 2 cents from a proffesional cabinet maker. You guys are building rocket parts here. All that is required is a ball park weight, to determine if the lid falls within the weight/load range of the desired hardware. Varience one way of the other is acceptable. Use the scale, it really works. Buy your hardware after you cut the raw stock for the lid to rough dimensions and weigh it. You won't need it until the lid is finished anyway, and the finished lid will weigh less than your rough cut stock.
Best regards, Butch Price 20 years in the casework industry
On Nov 10, 3:14 am, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

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Thanks Joe, Doug, Chris, Butch, Charlie and everyone else who gave a useful answer. That's exactly what I was looking for. It's nice that there's still some people on this group that try to help instead of just making noise.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

What, are you suggesting that Oaks migrate? ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net says...

I wasn't aware that oaks were native to Africa... and neither are the authors of the encyclopedia on the shelf in my living room...
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Chris Friesen wrote:

http://www.hoganhardwoods.com/hogan/pages/technical/Technical_01/densitygravity.htm

year approx 1 1/8" thick, sank to the bottom of a bucket of water. Seems like that would put it's specific gravity over 1.0 Joe
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wrote:

Since the rule of thumb for air-drying the "average" wood is "one year per inch, plus a year", I suspect it takes a good bit longer than one year to air-dry 1-1/8" thick live oak.
The 0.88 figure is specifically for KD 12%.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

oak here on my desk. A set of circles cut with hole saws to make a Tower of Hanoi Game similar to this http://www.mazeworks.com/hanoi / I took the smallest disk, so it would fit in a plastic cup I have and dropped it in the water. Disk is 3/8" thick, 1.25" dia. with a .25" hole from the hole saw. It has been drying for over 2 years in a heated and air conditioned office. http://people.musc.edu/~gormanj/Liveoak / Joe
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wrote:

It appears my original link is bogus, but Doug's range is not correct either. There are a number of woods that exceed 0.72
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Yes, it is -- for oak.

Certainly there are. How many of them are oaks?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Well, there's a pretty good illustration that you can't believe everything you read on the web. That's just flat wrong. It isn't even close.
Here are the *correct* figures from the experts, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory. Refer to Table 4-3a. The data for various species of oak is on pages 5 and 6.
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/ch04.pdf
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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16 x 48 x 3/4 = 576 cubic inches = 1/3 cubic foot.
Common North American oaks range from about 38 to 45 pounds per cubic foot, kiln dried, with white oaks being generally heavier than red oaks. So figure a weight of 13 or 14 pounds if it's red oak, 14 or 15 if it's white.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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