Need good resource info for scroll saw accessories


As I've begun to construct my orders for various scroll saw blades, my head is spinning faster than a drum sander! Skip tooth .. reverse tooth .. spiral ...
Obviously, I will probably do just fine to begin with by getting an assortment and practicing, practicing, practicing. But research takes time and as I've tried to weed through the instruction material I've found, I'm having a hard time discerning the highlights of which blade type is best (if indeed there IS a best) for which type of work.
Can anyone point me to some good resources? I've already begun to roam the forums, which is always a good place to start. But it would be nice to read some well-written text that doesn't require two years experience to understand the nuances.
Thanks!
Jack
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

We added a scroll saw a year ago at swmbo's insistence. Since then I have used it more....
Olson blades are good -- but! ... The Precision Ground Blades can cut too fast for a beginner. We got some finer blades thrown in with the scroll saw. They can be better for a beginner -- as opposed to the Olson PG Blades.
My definition Coarse 9TPI or less Medium 10TPI to 15TPI Fine 20TPI or more -- more or less. (ymmv as far as designations go)
Consider Skip tooth to be a "coarser" blade than the TPI would lead you to believe -- in terms of cutting speed -- even if the finish is very good.
I say get a selection of fine, medium and coarse and practice on some material of 1/4" 1/2/" and 3/4 " thickness -- say pine. Then you will have a feel for what the blades can do.
Then try an Olson PG skip tooth blade (medium) -- which is fairly fast. I suspect that the cuts will be smooth with little ridges occasionally where you paused. The finer tooth blades will be the overall smoothest.
Important thing is to do a constant pace on the cut and only pause at sharp turns where you can pull back, pause and plan the next pass.
Before you start your cuts, plan the entire phase of the cut. Even practice the motion. You really don't want to pause when you cut. Cutting slower gives you thinking and planning time if you missed thinking something through and it becomes obvious _during_ the current cut.
Start off with a 15 to 20TPI blade and try to cut a smooth "circle" that you mark on a piece of wood. Don't try anything coarser till you can get a reasonably smooth curve. It worked for me.
hope that helps...
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

Forgot -- look here
http://tufftooth.com /
Nicks and Welbecks also have blades...
http://woodwork.pmccl.com/Business/linksbusiness.htm
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Jack:
1st: this NG is for general woodworking. For scroll saw forum and LOTS of help with blades and so forth: http://www.scrollsawer.com/forum/index.php? this is a sponsored scroll saw forum by Scroll Saw Workshop. There are several others, but try this site first. You don't have to join to read the posts.
2. For generic blade info try: http://www.scrollsaws.com / Several general info pages by Rick which covers many aspects of Scroll sawing.
3. (IMHO) Mike's workshop, http://www.mikesworkshop.com/ sells Flying Dutchman blades. By far the best blades. Try Mike's assortment pack. Good bargain. I think it is an intro offer of 5 dozen blades (Total 60) for $1.00 and free S/H. For one dollar, shipped by US postal free, and you get 60 good blades to try on scrap wood. Mike also has a phone number for call in orders.
4. Don't get confused with too much blade hype. A lot of it is just hype. There is no one blade for every case. Different blade types for different wood, and thickness. Plywood, thick solid wood, and thin solid wood all take different blades. SS Blades are cheap. They break a lot.
5. What is important is for you to enjoy the use of your tool. No matter which blade you use, you need to enjoy the tool. With that said, scroll saw is a learned technique since it involves eye-hand co-ordination. No jigs, fixtures, or aids; you free hand feed the wood past the blade. Takes practice, not a hard to learn, may not take a lot of practice, but it does take practice. If you stress out on blade types, you won't get to the enjoyment part.
6. Several books have been written on help for beginner scroll sawyer. Reply back and I will offer some suggestions, but go to the above sites first.
Phil
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message


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Thanks Phil. Rick's site is chock full of stuff for me to read and study. And of course, I know - without being told - that the real secret here is practice, practice, practice! The FD blades sound good. I had sent email to Mike to verify that his blades would in fact work with my scroll saw. He gave me some pointers. And like you said, the intro packs he offers are a great deal.
The $1 deal is for a dozen of his #5 blades. He also has, for only $13, an assortment pack of five dozen blades. Probably should get the larger assortment so that I can get a feel for the difference. The book he lists on his site also sounds like something that would help.
Thanks again!
Jack
Phil wrote:

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Your welcome. Glad to be of help.
If you get the book, also go to your local Office Depot or Wal-Mart. get the following: 2" wide clear package tape 2" wide painter's tape (blue or purple, but low tack) 3M spay adhesive (super -77 or Photo Mount)
go to Kinko's and make several Xerox copies of Exercise 1,2, and 3 (this is permitted by book copy right on inside cover)
while you are learning: Painter's tape goes on wood. spay back of paper pattern, wait for 30 seconds apply pattern to top of painter's tape apply package tape over pattern. (this cuts down on burns in kerf)
watch for the following: Keep your wrist off the saw table. Guide with finger tips of both hands, keeping back of hand in line with lower arm Watch for bad habit of applying too much side to side pressure. Let blade and saw cut the wood, don't feed too fast. Watch for any muscle cramp (back, neck, upper arm, legs) as you may need to adjust how and where you are standing or sitting.
Phil
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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