Need advice on hammerdrill - Christmas present for husband

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Hi,
My husband asked for a hammerdrill for Christmas. I had never even heard of one before he mentioned the word(s?). I've tried to do some research but as usual, there are way too many suspects even within one single brand.
I think I'm looking for a cordless 18 volt hammerdrill. Certainly no larger. The three names that keep popping up are DeWalt, Bosch, and Milwaukee.
I welcome any suggestions for specific models and where to buy them (online if necessary).
TIA, Jeanne
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If he is putting anchors in concrete, the Porter Cable corded one is awesome, but way too much for general use in the shop. Tell us more. WL

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Wilson wrote:

Hilti should pop up on that list as well since they are pretty much the best of the best. Rather overkill for home use though. Makita also has a decent hammer drill.
I'd tend to avoid cordless for several good reasons:
1) A hammer drill is an infrequently used tool for home use. Batteries tend to die if they aren't used regularly.
2) Cordless costs a lot more and provides little benefit unless you are a contractor doing a big commercial job.
3) Corded models are lighter and generally more powerful.
Pete C.
(Yes, I have a Hilti hammer drill (TM7SVSR) for home use, but I'm nuts)
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Wilson wrote:

Thanks. I knew Porter Cable was overkill (and pricey) for what my husband does (home shop) - that's why I didn't mention PC (or Makita).
Jeanne

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wrote:

If I can assume that what he wants is a fairly heavy duty cordless drill with the hammer feature (as opposed to a dedicated hammerdrill), then I can recommend the DeWalt 18V RXP unit for home shop use. I am also sure that the others mentioned would be great for this use. Just so you know, what I am talking about is a cordless drill with a setting that turns the hammer feature on or off as needed and would mostly be used for regular drilling and screw driving and periodically used for heavy work in masonry, etc. with the hammer feature. If he already owns a cordless drill or two and really wants a dedicated hammerdrill that will be heavily used, then I can't give you any advice other than the maintenance guys at work "demand" Hilti drills for that kind of stuff and for core drilling - big $$$$$.
Dave Hall
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Impact driver is what I think you were trying to describe, Dave. I started to respond when Jeanne first posted, then backed off. All I know about is the impact driver.
I have a 12v Bosch, and like it al lot. Used it quite a bit in assembling the kitchen I'm building for my daugher-in-law, as well as a lot of other places. Drives screws reliably and fast, without serious wear and tear on the shoulder and elbows. Not too heavy, and not too hard on the Visa card, either.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)- Cordless/dp/B0002VAFUC
If this isn't what he wants, I apologize to all.
Patriarch
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On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 17:47:56 -0600, Patriarch

No, I am talking a hammer drill. My DeWalt 18 v. has a hammer drill setting, but is seldom used as such. The clutch has the normal low to high settings, the drill setting and the hammer setting. If you only have one decent sized cordless and little (but some) need for hammer drill capabilities, this is a nice setup. If you are hammer drilling on a regular basis, get a dedicated hammer drill (corded in my opinion), but for my use this drill fits my overall needs. Impact drivers, as far as I know, are great for driving screws and bolts in heavy duty situations like deck building. I have never used an impact driver other than a pneumatic for lug nuts. Core drills are another thing altogether given the lubrication needs while drilling and the wetness of their world.
Dave Hall
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I have a corded Bosch hammer drill that I got for about $160 a few years ago at Sears. It is perfect for home shop work - not too big, plenty of power, inexpensive. I agree with the earlier post saying that a hammer drill is not the best candidate for cordless. A Hammer Drill usually isn't used all that often, and when it is used, you want all the power you can get.
On the other hand, if your husband already has a few cordless tools with batteries bigger than 14 volts, then it would make sense to get the same brand/battery size as the existing tools so that the batteries and charger can be shared. This would make for an even better gift, because he'd have a new tool, AND extra batteries for tools he already has.
Mike
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I've have both 18volt Dewalt and Bosch cordless hammer drills and more recently purchased a Bosch bulldog corded hammer drill. The cordless ones cannot compare to the Bulldog, it will drill and can drive anchors in concrete with little effort, and quickly. The bits for the bulldog are SDS shanks which means they won't fit in a conventional drill. The bulldog is for production drilling in concrete pretty much exclusively. However, if your hubby just needs a hammerdrill for occasional drilling and driving anchors in concrete, the cordless ones will be just fine. They will take a little longer to get the job done, but are more versatile in they can also be used with regular bits to drill wood, metal etc. The Bosch bulldog is somewhat less expensive than the big 18volt cordless models too. --dave

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P.S. One other nice thing about the Bulldog is it can be set to just hammer, and not drill. A chisel can be purchased that will fit in the drill basically making it into a small jack hammer. This feature will come in very handy if the hubby ever wants to demolish a brick or block all. --dave

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On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 14:32:24 +0000, Dave Jackson wrote:

I suspect that that's gross overkill unless he's building a Usonian house or something.

--
--John
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Dave Jackson wrote:

So, if he had to (hypothetically, of course) chip away part of a concrete patio (the part that is blocking a hypothetical window well), this would do it?
Thanks, Jeanne

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Dave Jackson wrote:

Technically the hammer only feature differentiates that unit as a "rotary hammer" and not a "hammer drill". A rotary hammer is another step up on the heavy duty scale from a hammer drill.
Pete C.
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Dave Jackson wrote:

Dave,
May I have the model name and number of the Bosch Bulldog? When I read your PS to my husband, he said that was what he wanted. When I tried searching for Bosch Bulldog, I got the Bosch Bulldog Xtreme (corded) rotary hammer (like this: http://www.boschtools.com/tools/tools-detail.htm?H 5982&GT915&Ig521). Obviously, power tools have their own jargon and the distinction between a rotary hammer and a hammer drill is too fine for me.
Thanks, Jeanne
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 17:43:39 -0500, Jeanne wrote:

Bulldog is not cordless.
If he wants a cordless SDS hammer then look at <http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/bosch/11536vsr.htm?L+coastest+hsvj0109ff7e6c7e+1165718844 , <http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/dewalt/dw005k-2.htm?L+coastest+hsvj0109ff7e6c7e+1165718844 , or for some other brands froogle "sds cordless hammer".
Cordless rotary hammers aren't cheap, not good ones anyway.
The difference between a hammerdrill and a rotary hammer is that a hammerdrill is a carpentry tool--it will make good-sized holes in wood and in sheet metal and occasionally small ones in concrete all day, the sort of thing one does when building houses and wood-frame commercial buildings. A rotary hammer is a heavy construction tool, it will make big holes in concrete and structural steel all day, using special bits that only fit rotary hammers.

--
--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

Understood.
When I read that corded hammerdrills probably made more sense, I asked my husband if he minded a corded one. He said no, he realized having the cordless traded away too much power and usability for his needs.

Understood.
Oh good. That sounds like what he wants. The previous owner of our house covered up the window wells when the back patio was poured. We want to get rid of the concrete over the window wells. It sounds like the rotary hammer is a better tool for that.
Thanks Jeanne
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 20:56:11 -0500, Jeanne wrote:

That sounds more like a job for a breaker hammer. Never had occasion to bust up concrete myself so can't really say how much tool is enough, but suspect you're in the realm where rental will make more sense than buying.

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--John
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

I'd think the best option for that would be a masonry blade in an angle grinder to make a clean cut line a good inch deep to isolate the to be removed section from the remaining patio. At that point just a sledge should be able to break up the to be removed material. A hammer drill or rotary hammer really aren't applicable (except for a very big rotary hammer) and a breaker is just over kill to break up a few square feet of patio slab.
Pete C.
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Jeanne wrote:
<snip>

For a job like that I'd rent an electric chipping hammer such as this:
http://www.envisupply.com/rentals/support/BoschElectricJackhammer.htm
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Jeanne wrote:
> I think I'm looking for a cordless 18 volt hammerdrill. Certainly no > larger. The three names that keep popping up are DeWalt, Bosch, and > Milwaukee.
Pick one, you won't go wrong.
SFWIW, I had a standard 1/2", 18VDC, DeWalt Drill that saw a lot of service in the 10 years before it was stolen.
Had to replace the batteries, but that was it.
Lew
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