Need a new TS rip blade.

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> Any opinions?

I do like Freud. I wanted to love the thin kerf Glu-Line rip LM75. First one I got left bad cut lines and I figured it had one or two badly sharpened teeth. I took it back for a refund but they said try another. It did the same thing. I went back to the standard rip thin kerf LU87 and love it.
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My Freud thin kerf rip goes through hard maple like a hot knife through butter, but it tends to lead, enough that the surface needs truing up with my ever-handy #5. For a real glue joint quality blade, you need a standard kerf.
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A rip blade would not have 90 teeth. A good general purpose blade like the Forrest WW2, some of the Freuds or CMT, (I'm not familiar with exact model numbers for these) or a few other good quality blades will do very well for most use. A dedicated ripping blade is nice to have if you plan on doing a LOT of ripping, or ripping thicker stock, especially on a contractor's saw or other saw with 1.5 or less HP. Most 10 inch rip blades have 24 or fewer teeth. (Man, I remember when I had 24 teeth... Those were the days!)
--
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with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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I found a high speed steel rip blade that someone before me had purchased. That was the time that you sent your blades out to be sharpened and reset when they got really bad. You touched them up yourself when they just got a little dull.
But I digress. I was ripping some really wet air dried yellow pine, and it was giving me fits. I decided that all my blades were not sharp enough for this job. Then I remembered the old rip blade I had seen on a shelf. This thing was a 10" blade, and I think it had 8 teeth. I put it in just to see how bad it would be.
Surprise. It went through the rest of that hard ripping wood at least twice as easy, and I was amazed.
So I agree; less teeth is better. 24 teeth should do well.
--
Jim in NC



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"Morgans" wrote

---------------------------- My first carbide tipped blade was a 10"-8 tooth Sears & Roebuck special.
Why 8 teeth?
It was low cost.
Lew
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Morgans wrote:

I agree. I have 8, 12, 24, 40 and 60 tooth blades. I bought the 40, and was given the 60. The 8 tooth is the oldest and cheapest of all my blades and it cuts like butter. The cut is a little rough but I've glued up stuff without running it through the jointer and had no problem. Smooth surface is a non-issue but chip out and straight cut is all important. Sharp 24 tooth is good. 90 tooth is stupid for normal work, imo. My 60 tooth hangs on my wall...
I was cutting a 10 taper though half a Wolmanized 2x6x12' for a rail cap (
http://jbstein.com/Flick/RegesTopRail.jpg ) and my underpowered saw was dying in the wet lumber with just a 1 1/2" depth. Switched to my 40 year old 8 tooth and hello dolly, cut the full 2 3/4" depth in one pass.
--
Jack
A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.
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I have a good rip blade, I never use it. I only use a Forrest WWII reg kerf 40 tooth for all cuts. I lied, I use the rip blade when cutting contaminated wood. I even resaw with it full depth.
My Forrest blade is 10 years old.....and is resharpened every 18 months or so.
If you invest in a Forrest you will not have to wonder if you have one of the best...and in the long run it will be cheaper.
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