Need a new TS rip blade.

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I think I have used it on every project that I have worked on in my shop. Really, I have used it more that I thought I would.

Well, no. Cutting with a regular kerf blade, you do cut the outsides first so to speak. There is nothing left in the center of a 7/32" dado like there would be using a thin kerf. Otherwise, yes, with the aid of the KerfMaker on wider dado's.
When I did this with a thin kerf I would make multiple passes until the width was correct. If you made the outer two cuts first they had better be right, the KerfMaker did not exist back then. I found that sneaking up on the final was less wastful than from unusable results trying to get the two outer cuts precicely positioned. You really could not set this up in advance by testing with scraps unless you did not mind the chance of gaps.
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I meant with the thin-kerf blade, where the dado > 2x the kerf.

Ah, I thought I was the only one who had to sneak up on joints. I thought you real woodworkers were perfect. ;-) Yes, the Kerf Maker helps a lot. I only wish it were a bit larger.
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You will like it.
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On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 20:00:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

How is blade life on a thin kerf? Don't they heat up and dull a whole lot more quickly? I don't have but a couple cuts on the Diablo I bought for the skilsaw, maybe 5' in total, so I don't know yet.
-- We're all here because we're not all there.
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wrote:

..
If anything, I'd expect less wear on a thin-kerf. They use less power to cut, so they shouldn't get as hot. Less mass, too, but the surface area is the same (and any dissipation through the hub, trunion,....

I have a Diablo for my 6-1/2" 18V Dewalt cordless circular saw. Nice blade.
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If anything, I'd expect less wear on a thin-kerf. They use less power to cut, so they shouldn't get as hot. Less mass, too, but the surface area is the same (and any dissipation through the hub, trunion,....
I suspect equal wear, but where do you get the idea that less power needed from the motor would equate to "should not get hot"?
Actually I often over heated a thin kerf blade, for what ever reason. It warped enough to see, as it cooled it straightend back up some what.

I have a Diablo for my 6-1/2" 18V Dewalt cordless circular saw. Nice blade.
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Less power == less heat. Assuming the power needed to turn the saw is proportional to the kerf width, the heat generated is also proportional to the kerf width. The dissipation will be proportional to the surface area and the dissipation through the bearings is a constant (with temperature), so a thin-kerf should run at a *lower* temperature.

Yes, it's understandable that a thin-kerf will warp more easily since it's not as rigid. That likely goes both ways, though. It'll more likely recover than a standard kerf.
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Yeah, I ain't buying it, ;~) I agree with some of what you said, but I still dont agree that less power needed from the motor =''s less heat from the blade. A thin kerf blade is 1/32" thinner than a regular kerf blade. Still the teeth have approximately the same side surface area on both sides. So friction is not really 1/3 less over all, it is 1/3 less on the top of the tooth. Basically they have the same contact area on the side of the teeth.
And ture teeth are cut so the sides do not touch the wood under optimum circumstances but in little time pitch builds up behind the cutting edge of the tooth and rubs the wood.

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Think of it this way, all of the power the motor delivers is turned into heat eventually. Some of it is transferred to the sawdust, some is retained by the blade. The more power needed for the cut, the more heat needs to be dissipated elsewhere (some of it by the blade).

Sure, that friction against the sides would be independent of the kerf width. Making more sawdust takes more energy. More energy => more heat
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On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 16:31:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

I have to agree with robatoy about hearing and seeing the vibration and oscillation even with a stabilizer on a thin kerf blade. And this is with a Forrest blade and a Forrest stabilizer.
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On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 22:05:50 -0500, Gordon Shumway

There's your proof that thin blades wobble:
Even _Forrest_ makes stabilizers.
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Jeez, If had been a snake it would'a bitten us. :~)
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> Perhaps, but saw blade stabilizers weren't invented for nothing, sir.

I have always assumed that stabilizers were invented long before the modern manufactyring techniques with laser cut reliefs and the nearly perfectly balanced blades they can manufacture nowadays.
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On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 21:39:24 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

If it's on the shelves, it serves a purpose. Unused, unsold hardware costs money to keep there, so it doesn't last.
My ryoba cuts straight and smooth most of the time, but I've been bitten a couple times. A knot pushed it 1/4 of an inch from where it was supposed to go in a porch cover tubasix once. That was fun. I noticed that it was getting harder to saw with. Thin circular saw blades are vulnerable to the same forces. I have one thin Freud 7-1/4" blade on my skilsaw now and find that it doesn't always cut square. If I put a straightedge from corner to corner on a tubasix, I can see daylight in the middle.
Gimme a standard blade, please.
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On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 05:06:29 -0400, Nova wrote:

Maybe they haven't, but I have. What's the problem? I had none.
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Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Wow, that is infact a great way to test it. Yeah, if you do get deflection it will widen the zero clearance.
2 points.
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Guess mine is good then...
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wrote:

If any of you can't make a decent glueup of two relatively flat/dry boards cut on any moderately tuned-up saw and any relatively new carbide blade, something is wrong with -your- setup or -your- technique, not the saw or blade. Hell, even Crapsman can get that right. <gd&r>
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wrote:

Totally agree, I recently got rid of my jointer, it collected dust and was in the way.
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Sure, they were invented (by marketing dept perhaps?) to make the blade companies a few more bucks. I've used thin kerf blades with and without the stabilizers and can't tell the difference. What's more, I can't really tell the difference in normal use between a thick and thin kerf blade in my Delta Contractors saw. Not unless I'm say ripping 8/4 hard wood or similar, anyway. That said, I do prefer a standard kerf blade, but not for any stability reasons. I just find it a lot easier to calculate things with 1/8" instead of 3/16.
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